Need help with capacitive button cover for Xbox One.

So I hate capacative buttons.  I work for Microsoft as a game dev and we all have Xbox Ones.  They have the worlds most sensitive capacative power button.  We regularly accidentally turn our boxes off with a slight brush of the hand, bumping a coffee cup that was too close or brushing a controller cord against it.

I have been trying to build a button cover.  One that will still turn it on and off with an actual press rather than a light glance of the hand.  I have had no luck so far and have been learning about conductive surfaces along the way.

The original plan was to use conductive rubber and some scotch double sided tape.  The tape I am using is a clear rubber and has a mm or so of thickness to it.  I bought some gasket punches and punched out a button about the size of the capacitive area of the Xbox One power button, around an inch, and then another in the tape.  I punched out a smaller center hole in the tape to turn it into a washer, and stuck it onto the button and stuck it on the Xbox.  In theory you have to press the button in to make contact with the capacative button to turn on or off the Xbox.  But alas, it still turned on with the slightest of brush still.  I stacked the tape up to four times.  I tried foam mounting tape.  Alternated tapes, stuck electrical tape inbetween, and still the same thing.  

On their own the tapes wouldn't turn on the button when tapping them to, but perhaps there was enough distance when touching holding it length-wise rather than flat against.

I figure the electricity must be flowing over the non conductive surface and still going to the button.  In the office with all the EMF I seem to be averaging around 3v to the touch.  I have a grounding mat at my desk that when I make contact with takes me under a volt, to around 0.3v but that doesn't make a difference.

So I figured I needed a bigger insulator.   I got some larger machine washers where the hole seemed larger than the capacative area, punched another larger button out of the conductive rubber and glued it over the hole.  Using double sided scotch tape I stuck it to the Xbox.  The same thing as before happened.   Even touching the rubber only was enough to turn it on with a light bump.  

I figured I needed a ground.  I tried removing the grounding cord from my mat and holding it against the rubber of the button.   It seems slightly less responsive but still turned on easily.   I tried running copper tape along the side of the Xbox to the button to see if that would draw away the charge, but it did not.

Taking my rubber washers I used my multimeter to see if they were conductive at all.  They did not seem to be.  Setting it to measure the volts in ac they are picking up about 0.03v, but so is just the air.  But the rubber rings will turn on the Xbox when I hold them though the thick double sided tape will not.

Does anybody have any ideas on how to get this to work or what I am doing wrong?  I will admit I don't know a ton about this stuff.  But I don't understand how these materials can turn the button on.

sort by: active | newest | oldest

maybe try putting a piece of electrical tape over it, it will stop the flow of electricity that activates the button. I don't know cause i don't have an Xbox one but that's how one of my friends stopped the sensitive on/off button for his newer gen Xbox360.

I know I could completely cover it but the goal is to try and make some sort of button that requires a press than a glance. Hopefully something that is some what flush with the surface. But covering the button over is the easy option and not what I'm trying to figure out how to do.

maybe set up something on the perimeter of the circle with the rubber seals so it stands up about half a cm. above the button then put some kind of material over it that will stay flat for that half centimeter above the surface, then when its pressed it will fold in on itself and activate the button.

That's the idea currently. The conductive part is separate away from the button by a mm or two. But the theoretically non-conductive stuff is turning out to be just conductive enough when attached to the conductive rubber and the xbox. The regular rubber is confusing in that when I'm holding it it can turn on the button without even making contact. I can only assume it's static electricity. But there is nothing physically making contact with the conductive area yet it's still turning on with a brush.

I don't know how the button is programmed on the Xbox, but the capacitive touch sensors that we make at Phidgets are programmed to re-set themselves after 30 seconds so if you connect an acrylic or metal to them, the acrylic or metal will become part of the touch sensor (up to a certain point). My suggestion would be to create a little door to go around the button (like one of those mission control switches you see in rockets where they have to open a small door before pressing the button to engage launch or whatever). Lego makes these kinds of things. I don't have an xbox, so not really sure on the size, but I'm sure you could find something big enough to fit around the button without connecting to the capacitive touch part.

Discharge every part of what your working with. Use one of those
things (big on the technical terms) you clip to your side when your
working with computer parts to discharge static electricity.

or just follow this guide:

http://www.wikihow.com/Remove-Static-Electricity

Nice idea but not exactly convienient. Also it won't work. I have a grounding mat at my desk that does just that. It doesn't make a difference if I'm touching it or not when pressing the button. It seemingly takes a very minor charge to turn it on or off.

Again I'm looking for something I can place over the existing button that turns it on or off with a press and is protected against light bumps and brushing cords turning it on or off. This means covering the whole of a button with materials that won't conduct too the actual button but part that will when pressed in to make contact.

Discharge every part of what your working with. Use one of those
things (big on the technical terms) you clip to your side when your
working with computer parts to discharge static electricity.

or just follow this guide:

http://www.wikihow.com/Remove-Static-Electricity