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Vga cable gone wrong

I've tried like 5-6 times to make myself a vga male-to-male cable for this 32" tv I have that I can't do anything but watch noise infested cable with.

So I'll skip all the bull****. I'm down to two cables I cut one from an old CRT and one from a non-working LCD monitor. Of course the lcd cable has to be considerably thinner, but the cables inside are relatively the same color.

I've used this , and this website for a little bit of reference, along with wikipedia's VGA Connector page. The only bit of useful information I really have is on the wiki page where it says the male connector is just a mirror image, but it still confuses me.

So far I have pins 1, 2, and 3 connected together at the cut end of the two cables, as they're the 3 thicker cables inside there. The rest of the cables seemed to be the same color as on the other cable, except that one had a black wire, and one with a red one (these turned out to be the same pin so I wired them together). The rest of the wires I matched together according to color and some of them I've heat shrinked, but I figured I better not waste any on wires I'm unsure about.

Sure enough, it does not work, my LCD continues to display no signal, and I'm now wishing I didn't cut apart the first hand made cable I had (I grabbed off a cart at school). But the image quality was crudd, and it turns out it was wired in the cable to 5 coaxial wires, probably causing the quality issue as it wasn't exactly standard.

Can someone tell me what the hell I did wrong???? Should it be wired differently instead of just a straight through cable?


Picture of Vga cable gone wrong
caitlinsdad8 years ago
1. Did you cut off the female connectors on the ends of two male-female cables and now you are trying to patch up all the wires in the middle to make one long male-male VGA cable? 2. Do you have a voltmeter to check that those pins on each connector are actually all connected straight through? Wire insulation colors can sometimes not be according to standard configuration even though they are supposed to be. Or just take a led throwie to test each of the the same pins on both the connectors to see if they are wired correctly. 3. Do you need to have all 14 wires going through?(one pin is not connected) Depending on the device it may need all wires. Good luck.
Punkguyta (author)  caitlinsdad8 years ago
1. Did you cut off the female connectors on the ends of two male-female cables and now you are trying to patch up all the wires in the middle to make one long male-male VGA cable? > No no, I Hate how the male and female vga ends are labelled, the male end should really be a female, but I guess because the male has pins it's a male cable end. Bla whichever, no I have 2 half male cables (spliced at one end, male on the other). I did get it to work last night! I had all the RGB wires hooked up right, but I guess when I color matched the smaller wires, they weren't actually indentical and yellow on one cable was like pin 14 while yellow was pin 12 or something on the other cable. I used the continuety test on my volt meter to determine the pin of each of the smaller wires and wrote it down in a text document, then I matched them together, and to my ULTIMATE SURPRISE, it works, and the image quality is bitchin. 2. Do you have a voltmeter to check that those pins on each connector are actually all connected straight through? Wire insulation colors can sometimes not be according to standard configuration even though they are supposed to be. Or just take a led throwie to test each of the the same pins on both the connectors to see if they are wired correctly. > Well you are exactly right, this is what I ended up doing and yes, some of the wires are different pins even though same color. 3. Do you need to have all 14 wires going through?(one pin is not connected) Depending on the device it may need all wires. Good luck. > While I was looking at it, both male ends of the cable have all 15 pins, but the cables inside only have like 8 wires I think, 3 for your RGB signal, and the others are for Hsync/Vsync/DDC-serial line, these are the ones that I had messed up. I'm really amazed I actually wired something together and got it to work, and while I'm only reading your post today, I appreciate the reply, I thought that no one could see my topics because I couldn't even find my topic on the website except for from my profile page (weird :S)
Thanks, I still have enough trouble trying to make an ethernet cross-over cable.
Punkguyta (author)  caitlinsdad8 years ago
What? I know for sure a easily read diagram can be found online. As I remember having to look something similar up a while back. What blows me away is that the diagram that link has at the bottom of the page, I could not for the life of me find anything remotely similar to that diagram for a vga cable of any kind, standard or not.

And the vga connector has been around since 1985 FFS, what is going on here.