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how can i get away with stab proof armor in Australia

long story short, in melbourne australia i have organised a group called citizen patrol group we basically patrol trains, buses, streets etc and help people in need and remove the trouble makers we do this in super hero costumes (not as silly as it sounds we are creating a character worth looking up to and bringing innocence back to children through good old fashioned super heroes) my problem is we are aware it can be dangerous but commercially made ballistic vests are illegal in my country i want the best protection for my team mates and am looking for GOOD QUALITY methods of creating one or if there is a legal loop hole that will allow us our right to protect our bodies.

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Toga_Dan5 months ago

mythbusters collection 10 episode "paper armor"

Results: good protection against slashing, stabbing, field tip arrows, and a flintlock pistol. It failed with a 19th c revolver, but so did the steel armor.

Steel armor 2x the weight of paper.

Approx 30 thicknesses of paper. (folded)

Toga_Dan5 months ago

http://www.daviddfriedman.com/Medieval/Articles/Perfect_Armor_Improved.htm. I suspect that back in the day, armor may have been rawhide. Why bother tanning it

It does not really matter what material you use, here in AU body armour is as illegal as a silencer on your 9mm pistol.

wrong. not illegal at all, you just need a permit.

Good luck finding reasons to get one ;)

I could point out that you need brains not luck....or maybe I'll just leave it to you to try to work it out. additionally stab/slash resistant clothing/armour you dont generally need a liscence, as opposed to ballistic vests.

bjork2 years ago

check out plasticlamellar.com - they make plastic plates that are laced together to make a flexible type of armour for medieval reenactment purposes.

The plates are 2mm polycarbonate, and are effectively stab-proof.

They aren't bullet proof at all.

There are other companies that make the same plates out of steel. The result is heavier than the plastic plates.

Lamellar was a very popular form of armour right up until the end of the 19th century.

The other way to go is chainmail - and other posters have mentioned this. I'd stay away for sluminium or plastic chain for anything but the bare minimum protection. Go for fully welded steel rings.

Qcks2 years ago

With regards to ballistic armor, actually the law makes some sense, though I'm from the states and can't say exactly what Australia considers reasonable.

In the US, you need permits to buy ballistic armor, legally any way.

It's because authorities are trying to mitigate escalation of deadly force. If people are immune to bullets, they'll have to go to increasingly more powerful applications of deadly force to maintain things.

That said, stab proof armor doesn't make a bit of sense since police aren't too likely to bust out a knife.

The easiest stab proof stuff would be aluminum chain mail. it doesn't mix with bullets so well (the rings can be smashed into your body, effectively becoming fleshettes.), but it will stop most knives. Axes and swords are iffy.
There are patterns for chain mail kicking around. If you go this route, I advise you to invest in a spot welder, as it's the best way to close rings.

If you make it especially decorative, you could claim it as jewelry, though it seem like at some point the cosmetic effects and the protective effects might start to interfere.

As far as newer stab proof armor... they're using nano crystals of polyethylene glycol on top of a synthetic fiber weave... you probably don't have the stuff to process the polyethylene correctly, but if you're curious about trying, they might sell a laxative that's almost entirely polyethylene glycol. Here in the states it's called Miralax. You can also buy it for fog machines, though that's a little bit more questionable, since it's likely to be a mixture of differently size polymer molecules, and the laxative for human consumption actually has to conform to a tighter standard. They also put the stuff in E-cig juice, but that comes with it's own set of problems.

Non-newtonian fluids (I believe there's a specific word for this but it escapes at the moment...) are a major area of research on the subject. If i were so inclined to be doing something with this, I'd look into non-crystalline plastics, since those are technically not in a solid state. Anywho... just some late night random thoughts.

jgdabble2 years ago

So you and your friends are going to be super heros, vigilanties. This would be an extremely dangerous thing to do, I would just leave the police to their job, and not take it into your own hands. Trust me, leave the hero stuff to the people who are trained to do it.

RedBacks1013 years ago

Hey are you guys actually heroes?

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