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single speed scooter throttle conversion?

i have a scooter controller that requires a three wire throttle. could i just splice two of the three wires together to make it a single speed? the three wires are labled as: voltage ground speed adjusting signal

nguyenst8 years ago
I have the same controller. Not sure why you would make it a single speed but if you really want to , you just need to feed the 4.3v back into the sensor wire. On mine, the 4.3v is red. The SAS is green. Feeding the 4.3v back into the sensor wire will make the controller put out full speed. Not sure how you are going to control your scooter if it starts out at full speed.
NachoMahma8 years ago
. Difficult to say without knowing more about the circuit - the following may destroy your motor or other components. . To supply full voltage, just remove the module and connect the voltage and SAS wires. You may need to ground the ground wire, but it should work without doing that. . Once again, this may destroy something. Can you supply a schematic? Where does the voltage wire come from? Where does the SAS go?
budsiskos (author)  NachoMahma8 years ago
this pdf should help but its the best ive got
. Measure the voltage at the Voltage (Red) terminal on the throttle connector. Red meter lead to the connector terminal, black to ground (the black wire next to it will work or use the frame). Should be close to 4.3V, most likely DC.
. With the throttle wide open, measure the voltage at the Speed Adjusting Signal (Blue) terminal on the throttle connector.
. If the second reading is the same as (or just a little bit less than) the first, then it should be safe to short Voltage and SAS together.
. If you have to use AC to get a reading, ignore all this.
. If Voltage is much greater than SAS at full throttle, don't short them together.
. It may be easier to do the measuring/shorting at the controller.
. Keep in mind that I'm still not sure how your controller works, all the PDF tells me is how the external components are wired. If the throttle is not a potentiometer or rheostat, shorting the terminals may cause damage.