Idea Turn an Obsolete PC Into an Electronics Engineering Experimentation Environment

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Introduction: Idea Turn an Obsolete PC Into an Electronics Engineering Experimentation Environment

PCs go obsolete at a furious rate. The 4-year old 1GHz PC just isn't adequate to run the latest bloatware, fast action games, video and photo editing, and so on. But it's still fast enough to do SOME stuff, surely. Shucks, the 8-year old 400MHz system show up in the trash and I'm SURE they can run a C compiler or plain text editor just as well as they ever did.

And there is all sorts of minor hardware and sophisticated (but generally free and open source) software that can turn a PC into a useful lab tool.

Step 1: Lab Power Supply

There are already several instructables on making a bench-top power supply using an obsolete computer supply. There's no reason that you have to take the power supply out of the computer to do this; the average computer has plenty of spare power for a few experiments. And the popular +12 and +5V supplies are on nice convenient connectors (designed to attach to disk drives.) Put a panel with a couple of power jacks in a spare bay and you're golden...

With slightly more effort, you can add some fuses and ammeters, both of which are probably good ideas.

With significantly more effort, you should be able to come up with a variable voltage current-limited supply that still fits in a bay.

(Picture from https://www.instructables.com/ex/i/2F7340901BE310299AD7001143E7E506/)

Step 2: Oscilloscope From Sound Card Inputs

There is assorted software on the net that lets you use the line inputs of your sound card as a crude oscilloscope, though of course it is rather limited in bandwidth capability (About 20kHz vs 20MHz for a low-end "real" scope), and not so easy to calibrate either. Still, there is lots you can do with a 20kHz uncalibrated scope.

With additional effort and $$, you can add a more complex analog front end for better range, isolation, input impedance, etc.

(with SIGNIFICANT $$ and little effort, you can buy a half-scope that connects to the computer via USB and has real scope-like functionality and bandwidth. It'd still be somewhat less than a real scope. (but then we're talking about $$$ where it would make sense to put this in a brand-new computer.))

Picture from http://www.zeitnitz.de/Christian/Scope/Scope_en.html

Step 3: Function Generator From Sound Card Output

Likewise, there is existing software to turn the output of a sound card into a function generator, capable of generating sine, triangle, square, and complex waveforms at assorted frequencies.

An additional analog front end would provide greater output range and power drive capability, clipping to digital levels, etc.

Pictures from: http://heliso.tripod.com/download/generator/dsg.htm

Step 4: Logic Analyzer Using Parallel Port?

Supposedly you can also get a crude logic analyzer out of the parallel port. I have my doubts whether this would be as useful as the sound-card scope, but you could at least do a multi-line logic analyzer.
Picture from: http://www.xs4all.nl/~jwasys/old/diy2.html

The outputs of the parallel port could also be used for digital signal generation (but without the timebase of the sound card, exact timing might be difficult to get.)

Additional electronics creates more capabilities, up to "real" logic analyzers that connect via USB.

Step 5: Protocol Analyzer Using Serial Port

Serial data is common enough in projects that one might as well use the serial port to analyze serial data. Also, assorted voltmeters, printers, device programmers, and so on might use the serial port as-is.

Picture from: http://www.serial-port-monitor.com/screenshots-free-serial-port-monitor.html

Step 6: Assorted Simulators and Software Tools

And of course there is lots of existing freeware from vendors.
Switchercad, MPLab, AVR Studio, spice, and many more.

Step 7: Summary

Most of this stuff already exists. What I'd like to see is a page collecting large SETS of them, with instructions and gotchas, all in one place. Maybe even a linux live-boot CD you could insert and get an Instant EE environment (but we need not restrict the tools to running on linux.) (But it would be nice to have full tools sets for MULTIPLE operating systems.)

I'm particularly soliciting recommendations for packages that people have used and found useful, as distinct from half-finished projects that never quite worked....

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39 Comments

I'm not sure I'd quilify a 4-year-old 1GHz pc a obsolete. But if you have a pc that is really obsolete, say a good old 486DX or pentium 60/66/75/90..., you can still turn it into a network storage device using naslite. Cram a network card, four 300GB hard drives in it and you have a 1.2 TB network drive for less than 300€ (while a 250GB NAS costs about that much here in France). Of course, it works with a more recent pc but as mentionned above, obsolete is a word only you can define.

or you can buy a few of the 2Tb external hdd and then you have a super computer that never forgets a thing that you put on it... can you ever run out of mem on a 2tb external hdd???

I already run out 2TB. Series are quite effective. If you have them in HD, one file is 2GB, one Series has up to 10 Seasons which has up to 24Episodes each.
Or imagine a photographer who has a good camera with RAW-pics, they can be up to 250mb EACH!

I already run out 2TB. Series are quite effective. If you have them in HD, one file is 2GB, one Series has up to 10 Seasons which has up to 24Episodes each.
Or imagine a photographer who has a good camera with RAW-pics, they can be up to 250mb EACH!

Easy; edit video. about 12GB/hour for uncompressed video from miniDV cameras, so the 2TB is only about 150 hours worth. That's a lot of video, but by no means an inconceivable amount. My mac currently has about 200G of video plus still pictures, and I can easily imaging having 10x that amount by the time the kids have all moved out (and that's not even assuming that I'll move to HD video or >8MP jpegs.) Interestingly, one of by early computer-related memories concerns the ARPANet "Terrabyte storage project", circa 1979. DARPA wanted to see what the uses of having "virtually unlimited" online storage would be. So this contractor set up a robotic tape storage faciity; big room with a bunch of tape cartridge drives (2 inch video tape?) and a lot of tapes, to implement the full terrabyte. Relatively random people could get storage space (sorta "if you can access it, you must already have the correct prerequisites." Hmm.) Keep in mind that this was the timeframe when one of those large washing-machine sized 14inch disk drives held about 100MBytes, and the university mainframe hosting 10000+ students would usually have far less than 1GB total storage. So the advent of 1TB drives that you could just go out and buy (and carry home in one hand) was one of those "wow" moments...

wow that isnt much to have in a room... when now you can buy 1gig in a thing the size of a dime...

try 32gig now in 2011 times are changing heck there are cell phones out now with more power then alot of home computers

Yeah. Of all the advances in computer technology, I think the advances in mass storage have been most visible and impressive. For some reason CPU and memory have been pissed away into relative invisibility (the computer doesn't SEEM to respond much faster than ye old mainframes, even though it's doing a lot more with a lot more data.) But mass storage... Even with photos and video, the amount of storage a mere mortal can lay their hands on is clearly huge...

with the huge amount of space that can be crammed into a small stamp sized hdd i think we should kinda put the we need more memory thing on hold and develop faster parts for the computers, and cheaper ways to make the parts also.

Your statement is funny!   I remember years ago hearing people say "2 Gigabytes??!  Can you ever run out of space with that??"
;)