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Have you heard that joke about baby oil? The one that goes something like:

If corn oil is made with corn and peanut oil is made with peanuts, then what is baby oil made with?

The answer: Baby oil is made with mineral oil and fragrance by industrial professionals; babies don't have the fine motor skills or chemistry knowledge to create baby oil, duh.

Baby oil is useful for a lot of things beyond baby bottoms. It'll smooth, soften, lubricate, refinish, clean, and so much more. It also has some usual uses for which it really oughtn't be used. Read on for some tips and tricks that'll help you step your baby oil game up.

Step 1: First, Some Don'ts

Don't use baby oil as a "personal" lubricant, particularly if you are using a latex condom. (Just look at the next step to see who wins in the latex vs. baby oil battle royale.)

Don't use baby oil to tan. Melanoma looks bad enough without being shiny.

Don't eat baby oil. It has laxative properties and likely doesn't taste delicious. (Mineral oil is safe for human consumption, but only up to around 100 mg. Many of those milligrams come from food-grade mineral oil that's used in baking and other industrial food processing places because it's odorless and tasteless. My guess is that baby oil mineral oil isn't food-grade. Stay safe: don't guzzle a bottle of it.)

Don't use it in your 2-stroke engine.

Don't aim baby oil at helicopter pilots. Wait... that's for lasers. But you should still be careful around helicopter pilots with baby oil. It can be a slip-fall hazard, and pilots prefer the scent of aviation fuel.
<p>You can use it to remove &quot;tar&quot; (crude oil) from your feet after a trip to the beach (not as frequent of a problem as when I was a kid)</p>
<p>I used Dermalmd Cream during my pregnancy and I loved it. It didn't prevent me from getting stretch marks or anything but it made my skin feel soft and moisturized. It was the only thing that stopped my stomach from itching during my third trimester. I love it!</p>
You should add to the don'ts: <br>Do not use on babies. Only natural oils should be used on their delicate skin, especially NOT perfume! <br>If you're doubting this, think about it, it removes paint, dissolves latex, i even read here about someone getting BLISTERS using it in their ears... I would never use this stuff on a baby's skin.
<p>Baby Oil is a roach and ant repellent. Also a bathtub grime remover. Grout cleaner. My favorite....... FLEA KILLER!!!!! It stops them dead in their tracks. It's not the greatest for your pets skin I would imagine, just 1 time drench you pet with baby oil, and comb through and you will see dead fleas almost instantly</p>
<p>it's also really good for stopping chaffing!!! If you get chaffing during the hot sweaty summers then apply a coins worth of baby oil to the area that you get chaffed and massage it in and you won't get chaffing!</p>
<p>I've never used baby oil, what I've used in the past is a dab of 100% aloe vera gel--if you sweat, it just gets slicker and slicker, so skin-on-skin won't chaff in the heat. Don't get the kind of gel with additives, that alcohol is in there to make it dry faster when you put it on, but it will sting delicate skin (esp. delicate, already-sunburned skin!)</p>
<p>I read on another site that you can use clear mineral oil to replace <br>the water in a waterglobe. Water apparently will evaporate over time, <br>leaving bubbles, whereas the baby oil won't. I am trying to find out if<br> mineral oil will damage plastic figurines (which you often find in <br>waterglobes) before I do it, however.</p>
<p>Very interesting an humor-istic 'Ible, Thanks for sharing!</p>
<p>It's true baby oil can make your skin feel SO soft when you use it in your bath. HOWEVER, they should add a VERY serious warning on this one. Using baby oil in the bath makes it EXTREMELY slippery and can be extremely hazardous, especially if you're an older individual. I used to use baby oil a lot in years long past. I was lucky I never slipped enough to have any serious injuries however I did have a few close calls. If you choose to use baby oil versus something like Calgon (my preference today), please be EXTREMELY careful getting out of the tub; make sure you hold onto something else the entire time. </p>
<p>These are good hints, I've used some of them years ago in my life, even some of the don't. Back when I was a young teen in the early 1970s EVERY girl tried to tan themselves with baby oil. That was THE &quot;it&quot; product of the day. Of course we hadn't heard a ton of warnings about skin cancer yet or numerous other warnings. As a fair, blue-eyed blond I learned fairly quickly all people did like me was burn. No fun.....</p>
On behalf of the nation of Canada, I am obliged to inform you that -10 C is not cold. <br>You get down to -20 and then we'll talk. <br> <br>That being said, this is a really good way to prevent windburn, much like a good lipbalm, only all ovah ya face.
-20 still not cold enough. I've been out for 10 minutes in -26 with t-shirt and shorts. Saw powerlines fall th as t day.
<p>Ten minutes. But would you say that you would normally go out in shorts in that weather? All day? Or that this would be a good idea that most Canadians should or would do? No. We're smarter than that. You did it once, and I'm going to guess it was because you had to do one quick thing and couldn't be bothered to get layered up for just a short while. I'm sure we all have done similar.at some point; I know I have.</p>
<p>Like we need anymore reasons to never live in Canada.</p>
<p>If you can't stand the cold, stay out of the refrigerator.</p>
In that case, what do you call hot?
<p>You know, a lot of this just comes down to personal preference and this comment thread is really just a pissing contest now. <br>I hate anything over 25 C. That's just me, probably.</p>
<p>On the behalf of the state of Maryland, let me tell you that it is normal for it to be -20</p><p>Lucky Day! </p>
<p>Matey are you bragging or complaining about the cold? We are used to 50 degrees Centigrade</p>
On behalf of Missouri, at least you all have predictable weather. One day we'll have rain, sun for half the next day, followed by snow, all ended nicely with tornado warnings, usually mixed with a little flooding.
<p>Not to mention it can be pouring down rain but the sun is still shining and it is about freezing temperatures</p>
<p>or raining in one spot and bone dry ten feet away from it. But hey, I'm not complaining :)</p>
So true
Colorado in the middle of the U. S. Can reach both extremes in temperature any season don't like the weather wait 15 or 20 mins it will change
...or have 80 weather and five inches of snow two days later :)
<p>I would like to say -20 C is not really that cold......-40 C is cold especially in a breeze about 60 clicks (kph). Then, your finger tips, ear lobes, nose points and toe tips are quite numb and not feeling, and not bending or responding to nerve commands from the brain and ......oh the pain, the pain inside the house, directly afterwards. Most commonly found in Calgary, Alberta and map points north as well as the East Kootenays especially above 4500-5000 feet and skyward. Mighty chilly... felt insulated boots, down-filled parkas and a companion (human, not grizzly and certain not canine unless huskies with sweet disposition. </p>
<p>dat's cold !</p>
<p>Ah yes, the cherished perennial Canadian pastime of boasting who has it coldest. I actually reside in the hideous metropolis of Calgary. And we only had a couple of days of -28 last winter, at the worst. The wind, howling down those concrete corridors of the downtown, is what will make a mere -28 feel like the pits of Hell have frozen over and the age of despair is nigh.<br>I realize that my comment from 5 years ago must have stirred you deeply in your Canuck blood, but I meant -20 as a threshold marker; it is certainly not VERY cold, nor is it the worst a Canadian winter has to offer, but it is the point at which I concede that perhaps it's time to swap in the parka for the down vest, that perhaps winter HAS come again, and that longjohns might be a practical idea for the transit commute.<br>And now I need me some warm tea just thinking about it.<br></p>
<p>I wish that I could live in a place that cold... By my standards, it gets really hot where I live. In the summer, up to 100 degrees Fahrenheit(38 C). You people are probably laughing at me because you live in an area close to the equator or in some place like California, but I'm a cold climate creature.</p>
I acknowledge that -20 C is cold, but I'm from Montana. -20C is nothing, it's not strange to have -40F with a wind chill of -70 or 80. That would be about -57C...
<p>-70F is not -57C.. it's -21C ... your point is invalid... yes I know, 3 years late, but someone had to tell you...</p>
<p>Not sure what conversion app you're using, but -70F is most definitely about -57C. Farenheit and Celsius meet at -40 and then Fahrenheit starts seeming like the more impressive number, but Celsius would still be lower than -40. <br>-21C is about -6F</p>
<p>actually -70F is infact -57C so their point is valid, sorry (-70-32)/1.8 = 56.7(1dp)</p>
On behalf of those who are native to the Great Lake snow belts, -20 Celsius also is not that cold. When you get down to around -30 F (-34 Celsius), and the humidity is high enough that your nose-flesh literally freezes when you try to breathe - this is when its starts to get cold. Standing on the shores of the Lake with it blowing in your face - while the temp is in this range also will make it hard for anyone to say they are &quot;cold&quot; ever again. <br><br>And as to wind chill - forget it... -30 windchill &quot;feels like&quot; is picnic weather when comparing it to actual mercury levels on the thermometer.<br><br>Now we need someone from Siberia to post and say, -30 is nothing b/c...<br><br>:^)
I agree. -10C is nothing. -20C is cold, maybe awful. I am glad that I have never experienced -30C! I tried to run in -21C, and I got more tired than usually. Applying vaseline or baby oil on the skin is useful if you're outside for a longer time, but won't these freeze or makes it worser on the longer term?<br><br>-10C can even feel comfortable or really awful, it depends on<br>the wind and humity. I recommend slowly acclimating yourself to the cold weather by going out (shortly) with little clothes, letting oneself freeze and becomes cold to make it easier for the body to accept colder climates. I usually do that at autumn. :)
From experience over many years, here is an even easier way to acclimate in just a few hours...<br><br>Go out in the cold all bundled up. Do some back breaking labor - like splitting firewood. As you get warmer start stripping off outer layers of clothing until, Keep doing this until you are in a T-shirt. When you get done with the work, go in the house and take a shower but do not try to cook yourself b/c the water feels good. Also do not have the heat in the house up so it is baking you. And, above all, do NOT use an electric blanket - these cook you all night and your body gets to expecting this kind of heat and then you cannot acclimate.<br><br>I used to go to school in SC and would come home during Christmas vacation to the Lake Erie snow belt. The first day I was home I did this very thing and, from then on, just had on a light jacket &amp; hat while still home. <br><br>And if I was willing to write a book, one of the most intelligent sayings I have ever heard is an old indian saying: &quot;white men get cold b/c they treat cold like an enemy instead of a friend.&quot; I have found this more and more true as I get older. Explore the meaning of this saying and it will be hard for you to be uncomfortable in cooler climates. I also find my immune system is stronger.
<p>The Indians here in the southwest used to live in the basin in the winter and up in the mountains in the summer, so they were also a little sensitive about the cold and the heat too.</p>
&gt; &quot;white men get cold b/c they treat cold like an enemy instead of a friend.&quot; .....<br><br>True, beautiful said. Thanks. The Western have lost a lot compared to the ancient tribes living in harmony with the nature. Look at the animals and birds, do you actually see somebody resisting the cold weather?<br>They seems to shrug it away, it seems that they're listening more to the body, it's older and more developed than the brain. Where does the resistance most people have comes from?<br><br>The modern world seems to have that attitude that everything unknown/uncomfortable is a enemy to one's welfare. I wonder why.
Discomfort and pain are your body's way of telling you &quot;something's wrong, fix it or I'll keep annoying you.&quot;
On behalf of Australians: .... 20C is pretty cold... i think my legs would drop off at -20C. :D but I suppose you get used to the weather wherever you are, eventually.
I was going to comment on this, but you basicly nailed it!<br><br>-30 a couple of nights a year in these parts, colder happens... I was happy when my car started at -34 C .. :-)
Well try 45 C. For half a week on end.
Hear Hear Tanamoril!!!!
<p>DO NOT use baby oil to remove ear wax, use mineral oil (AKA sweet oil). In fact, almost all of these ideas are better done with Mineral oil! Baby oil is just mineral oil with added fragrance, I've seen people with the ear canal full of blisters from the baby oil's perfume.</p>
<p>I use baby oil to clean up with oil based and lacquer based paints as well, works well with most glues and caulk though nothing I have found works very good with epoxy nothing I would use on my skin anyway. I also use it to clean concrete and stucco off my hands before I use water, works great on auto oil and cruddy grease too then just soap and water and all clean!</p><p>uncle frogy</p>
<p>In a emergency you can wet a cotton ball with baby oil for a easy fire starter. Try to make it fluffy before setting it alight and be careful its highly flammable. Do it at home till you are comfortable with it. You just may need it one day. </p>
<p>im a rat lover and hate to see rats die on rat glue traps so i drop the rats glue traps with the rat far from home and use baby oil on the trap next day the rat is gone with oily feet. good for polish on mopeds and scooters that are faded but after a week have to redo it. whe polishing anything be sure to dry it immidietly as dust and so on collects on oil wd40 does the same .</p>
<p>never mind the cold baby oil dont warm you up stick to the subject. baby oil makes things very shiny and brand new but fades when dry</p>
<p>Beware using baby oil in the bath. I've used it having a shower but you MUST make sure the tub is thoroughly cleaned afterward or the next person might end up going for a loop! </p>
<p>nice, but essential oils are better than baby oil in some purposes</p>

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