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Step 6: Bath oil

Put a few drops into the next bath you draw. It'll leave your skin feeling touchably soft and silky. May not prevent pruniness in the extremities.
Good solvent for removing gummed labels, price stickers, etc. from non-porous surfaces. WD40 is even better.
WD-40 is Fish Oil, also good for arthritis stiffness
No fish oil in WD-40. That's a myth. Good stuff regardless.
<p>That sounds very <em>fishy</em> to me, I don't believe that it's true</p>
<p>If it had fish oil in it, It would smell like fish...</p>
Horsefeathers, Bosun Rick. I do not doubt the arthritis benefits. WD40 is good for many things you won't find on the label. &nbsp;There is no fish oil in WD40, that's another urban legend (a fish tale?).<br> <br> Here's another WD40 use I have tried successfully: restoring noisy carbon potentiometers. I feel safer using Caig Deoxit, but WD40 sure seems to work as well.&nbsp;
fish oil in wd-40 is true. 100% google-proof.
<p>&quot;Sorry Charlie&reg;, it just ain&rsquo;t so.&quot;</p><p>So says the official WD-40 website. Even if there was some fish oil in it, the information from MSDS data sheets shows the vast majority of its ingredients are petroleum-based.</p>
<p>a couple of previous posters mentioned mineral oil or baby oil on metalic/stainless finish appliances (like the stainless fridges) I think one said it worked and another poster claimed it didn't. Well I can tell ya from personal experience that WD40 works great on stainless appliances. Many naysayers will warn that it is a fire hazard on the stove; but I didn't think so; I just wiped off the excess. It really worked great; and fast too. I wasn't scrubbing and polishing all day.</p>
<p>Very interesting an humor-istic 'Ible, Thanks for sharing!</p>
<p>uses for baby oil https://chaibeedi.com/uses-for-baby-oil-you-didnt-know-about-and-that-have-nothing-to-do-with-babies/</p>
<p>It's true baby oil can make your skin feel SO soft when you use it in your bath. HOWEVER, they should add a VERY serious warning on this one. Using baby oil in the bath makes it EXTREMELY slippery and can be extremely hazardous, especially if you're an older individual. I used to use baby oil a lot in years long past. I was lucky I never slipped enough to have any serious injuries however I did have a few close calls. If you choose to use baby oil versus something like Calgon (my preference today), please be EXTREMELY careful getting out of the tub; make sure you hold onto something else the entire time. </p>
<p>These are good hints, I've used some of them years ago in my life, even some of the don't. Back when I was a young teen in the early 1970s EVERY girl tried to tan themselves with baby oil. That was THE &quot;it&quot; product of the day. Of course we hadn't heard a ton of warnings about skin cancer yet or numerous other warnings. As a fair, blue-eyed blond I learned fairly quickly all people did like me was burn. No fun.....</p>
On behalf of the nation of Canada, I am obliged to inform you that -10 C is not cold. <br>You get down to -20 and then we'll talk. <br> <br>That being said, this is a really good way to prevent windburn, much like a good lipbalm, only all ovah ya face.
-20 still not cold enough. I've been out for 10 minutes in -26 with t-shirt and shorts. Saw powerlines fall th as t day.
<p>Ten minutes. But would you say that you would normally go out in shorts in that weather? All day? Or that this would be a good idea that most Canadians should or would do? No. We're smarter than that. You did it once, and I'm going to guess it was because you had to do one quick thing and couldn't be bothered to get layered up for just a short while. I'm sure we all have done similar.at some point; I know I have.</p>
<p>Wait a minute ... WTF Jes*s Chr*st don't you cretins know we're about to be burnt up because of CO2 generated Global Warming ... just ask any Liberal fok just ask Lord Obama ... :P</p>
<p>Like we need anymore reasons to never live in Canada.</p>
<p>If you can't stand the cold, stay out of the refrigerator.</p>
In that case, what do you call hot?
<p>You know, a lot of this just comes down to personal preference and this comment thread is really just a pissing contest now. <br>I hate anything over 25 C. That's just me, probably.</p>
I was going to comment on this, but you basicly nailed it!<br><br>-30 a couple of nights a year in these parts, colder happens... I was happy when my car started at -34 C .. :-)
&lt;/pissing contest&gt;
<p>what's the problem with a little pissing contest... or is it that you just like stating the obvious?</p>
<p>indeed!</p>
Try Northern alberta. Minus 50 withoutany windchill. and winnipeg where its regularly in the minus 40's
<p>I was birthed in Cold Lake, AB and came of age north of Chicoutimi, PQ so boy was I ecstatic when we relocated to Toronto where it rarely drops below -30C. Now that's balmy =D</p>
And I thought the song said:<br><br>Almost Heaven... West Virgnia.<br><br>And here you have been hiding it up there all this time!<br><br>BTW - beautiful country up there!
Florida, here. 2004 saw hurricanes Charley, Frances, and Ivan. Mineral oil was great for getting camp gear unstuck during the blackout, keeping the native &quot;no-see-ums&quot; at bay, keeping the watermarks on the hardwood floors from gaining any permanence, and keeping various tools from becoming rusted and inoperable.<br><br>Vacation seasons often see vacationers trying to substitute baby oil for suntan oil or afterburn oil...which, by the way, is an excellent way to develop blisters in a sunburn - but not so great for &quot;tan acceleration&quot;, contrary to vacationers' expectations. It's also great for getting the fans unstuck after a season of storage.<br><br>Baby oil is also excellent at removing Kool Seal from hirsute homeowners' forearms, as, yes, it breaks down the latex.<br><br>Yes, it also makes for a great bath oil - but only in moderation, and - as with all oils - always be certain to clean the oil out afterwards, as the tub can get quite slick for the shower-taker afterwards.
<p>Do you just put it on the skin to keep the bugs off?</p>
<p>I'd have baby oil in with Avon's Skin So Soft together. But what I was referring to was when unfolding the netting [which was on stuck hinges], and using the mineral oil to unstick the hinges. The netting would keep the mosquitoes and &quot;no see ums&quot; at bay, alongside the citronella tiki torches and the no-mosquito formula a friend makes of SsS and baby oil. </p>
On behalf of the people of Hoth ...
My pet wampa agrees
LOL.
Well try 45 C. For half a week on end.
<p>On the behalf of the state of Maryland, let me tell you that it is normal for it to be -20</p><p>Lucky Day! </p>
<p>Matey are you bragging or complaining about the cold? We are used to 50 degrees Centigrade</p>
On behalf of Missouri, at least you all have predictable weather. One day we'll have rain, sun for half the next day, followed by snow, all ended nicely with tornado warnings, usually mixed with a little flooding.
<p>Not to mention it can be pouring down rain but the sun is still shining and it is about freezing temperatures</p>
<p>or raining in one spot and bone dry ten feet away from it. But hey, I'm not complaining :)</p>
So true
Colorado in the middle of the U. S. Can reach both extremes in temperature any season don't like the weather wait 15 or 20 mins it will change
...or have 80 weather and five inches of snow two days later :)
<p>In a perversely humorous way, I understand &quot;relative heat ranges&quot; and acclimatisation...</p><p>.</p><p>When I hear of people in say Moscow, dropping dead in a heat wave reaching 23*C for 3 days running, I mean it's not funny, but the issue of them calling 23*C a heat wave, is to me, because where I live, 45*C + is a pretty sort of extreme heat wave..... but in the middle of winter, the typical day time temperatures are like 8*C - BUT in Moscow, it's something like -20 or 30*C.</p><p>.</p><p>Which is interesting - as the average temperature span between a normally cold winter and a normally hot summer, seems to be about 30 - 35*, only their temperature range is SOOOOOO much lower than ours, but the effect of &quot;over heating&quot; in a heat wave, is about the same.</p><p>.</p><p>And while they start dropping dead in their version of a heat wave, you see them swimming at the beach with ice in the water in their summer time, while we would not go to the beach until it got up to about 30 - 35*C....</p><p>. </p>
<p>I would like to say -20 C is not really that cold......-40 C is cold especially in a breeze about 60 clicks (kph). Then, your finger tips, ear lobes, nose points and toe tips are quite numb and not feeling, and not bending or responding to nerve commands from the brain and ......oh the pain, the pain inside the house, directly afterwards. Most commonly found in Calgary, Alberta and map points north as well as the East Kootenays especially above 4500-5000 feet and skyward. Mighty chilly... felt insulated boots, down-filled parkas and a companion (human, not grizzly and certain not canine unless huskies with sweet disposition. </p>
<p>dat's cold !</p>
<p>Ah yes, the cherished perennial Canadian pastime of boasting who has it coldest. I actually reside in the hideous metropolis of Calgary. And we only had a couple of days of -28 last winter, at the worst. The wind, howling down those concrete corridors of the downtown, is what will make a mere -28 feel like the pits of Hell have frozen over and the age of despair is nigh.<br>I realize that my comment from 5 years ago must have stirred you deeply in your Canuck blood, but I meant -20 as a threshold marker; it is certainly not VERY cold, nor is it the worst a Canadian winter has to offer, but it is the point at which I concede that perhaps it's time to swap in the parka for the down vest, that perhaps winter HAS come again, and that longjohns might be a practical idea for the transit commute.<br>And now I need me some warm tea just thinking about it.<br></p>
<p>I wish that I could live in a place that cold... By my standards, it gets really hot where I live. In the summer, up to 100 degrees Fahrenheit(38 C). You people are probably laughing at me because you live in an area close to the equator or in some place like California, but I'm a cold climate creature.</p>
I acknowledge that -20 C is cold, but I'm from Montana. -20C is nothing, it's not strange to have -40F with a wind chill of -70 or 80. That would be about -57C...
<p>-70F is not -57C.. it's -21C ... your point is invalid... yes I know, 3 years late, but someone had to tell you...</p>

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