Instructables
So like many others, I decided to build my own washer/dryer pedestals for my new front loader washer and dryer, because the factory ones are a rediculous $600!!  Overall, the materials cost me around $150, a savings of $450!!  It's well worth it, and looks great, if you have a little time on your hands. 

The dimensions of this particular pedestal are 54" L x 26" W x 17 1/4" H.  I had to use these dimensions because the space where my washer/dryer is very small.  I also wanted the storage space underneath for laundry baskets and such.  The height from the ground to the bottom of the frame is 13", perfect for a standard laundry basket, (I actually measured one...haha!)  You can adjust ANY measurements in this project to fit your needs/space.

The materials you will need (from Home Depot) are:
(1) 3/4" MDF board cut to 54" x 26" (for top) You can get 1" plywood instead if you want to save more money, but the MDF provides a very smooth and durable finish after painting.
(6) 2x4x8 (for frame and support bracing)
(1) 4x4x8 (for legs)
(1) 1/4" 4x8 sheet of sanded plywood (for paneling on the bottom)
(1) 8 feet of corner trim (for bottom corners)
(1) 9 feet of 2 1/8" trim for front and sides (You can choose your own design and width, my wife chose an ivy vine pattern which happened to be 2 1/8")  Just be sure it's at least 1 1/2" width the cover the seam between the top board and the frame.
(1) Box of 2 inch wood screws
(8) 3 inch screws (heavy duty lag bolt style, these are to attach the legs to the frame)  I guess you could use through bolts with nuts and washers instead, but the screws seem to make it pretty sturdy. 
(1) Small box 3/4" brad nails (for trim)
(1) Wood filler
(1) Quart of paint of your choice (I chose Martha Stewart Living High Gloss interior from the Precious Metals color board in Metallic Silver)
(2) Cans spray primer (Kilz)
Small paintbush and smooth roller
220 and 400 grit 1/4 sheet sand paper for palm sander
Tack cloth
Standard carpentry tools: Circular saw, compound miter saw, palm sander, hammer, nail punch, drill, drill bits, measuring tape, triangle, yard stick, pencil etc etc, use what you need to get the job done...:)

Safety Precautions:  ALWAYS wear the proper safety equipment using power tools.  Please wear safety glasses or goggles using a circular saw, and a dust mask while using a sander.   

NOTE: ALL MEASUREMENTS CAN BE ADJUSTED TO MEET YOUR NEEDS.
 
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How did you attach the braces with the 4"x4" blocks in step 4?
usc0astie (author)  bmckenna19821 year ago
I used 2 inch wood screws, 2 into the brace and block from the bottom, then 2 more into the block and legs on top.
usc0astie (author)  bmckenna19821 year ago
I used 3 inch screws to attach the bracing to the 4x4 blocks from the bottom. Then used same size screws to attach the blocks to the legs.
jbrecken2 years ago
You don't need any kind of special treatment on the wood under the dryer to handle the high temperatures?
usc0astie (author)  jbrecken2 years ago
No you don't need to treat the wood. Most dryers built today are very well insulated and retain almost all heat on the interior of the dryer.
knife1412 years ago
Excellent project! Great idea -- looks better than the commercial pedestals and at a substantially reduced cost. Thanks for posting this.
mikeasaurus2 years ago
This project hits so many good points; elevated W/D's provide: storage underneath, can reduce noise transmission, and are better situated if there's ever a leak.
Thanks for sharing your project, it looks great!
usc0astie (author) 2 years ago
I apologize for the lack of detailed pictures. I wasn't originally going to post this to Instructables, but decided to do so after discovering this website, AFTER I finished to project. What a GREAT website! My next project will have much better pictures showing every detail. Thanks and enjoy! If you have any questions, just leave a comment and I'll do my best to answer them.