Introduction: 3D Jack O' Lantern in Blender

Want to make a jack o’ lantern but afraid of all the mess?  I don’t blame you! I’ve made an Instructable on how to make a 3D jack o’ lantern for FREE! Ready? Let’s get started!

Step 1: Step 1

Open up Blender. I will be using Blender 2.68a, which has the Cycles Render option. To see if you have Cycles Render, simply go to the top of the screen in Blender where the icon labeled Blender Render is located, hit it, and a dropdown menu will appear. Blender Render should be the last option on the list. I will be working in Cycles Render.
To start, delete the default cube by pressing X on the keyboard. Your screen should now be completely empty, like mine.
Now, go to Add, located at the top of the screen, choose Mesh, then select UV Sphere. With the sphere still selected, go to the left of the screen and change the number of Segments on the sphere from 36 to 12.  Then, change the number of Rings on the sphere from 16 to 10. This will save render time later.
Next, go to the bottom of the screen and choose View and choose Top, then choose Align to View in the Add UV Sphere Tab.  This will keep the top of the sphere facing the top.

Step 2: Step 2

While still in Top View, go to the Object Mode option at the bottom of the screen and hit it. Another dropdown menu will appear. Choose the Edit Mode option. The sphere should now be highlighted in orange.  Go to View again, and scroll up to Camera. To get out of the Camera, hold down the Scroll Wheel on your Mouse and move the mouse until you are happy with the new viewing angle.

Step 3: Step 3

Now press A on the keyboard. This will deselect the pumpkin. At the bottom of the screen, (Must be getting annoying!) beside the Global button, there will be three pictures of cubes. Choose the one on the end, on the right, and it will say Face Select. The Faces on the pumpkin will have circles on them now.
Next, go to View, then Top, and choose the first ring around the top of the pumpkin. To do this, hold down the Shift Key and the Left Mouse Button and choose all the faces.
Then, rotate the screen until you can see the top and sides of the pumpkin comfortably. This will come in handy in a second.
Press S on the keyboard to Scale down the top faces.  By pressing the period button, the number 5, and the number 3 key on your keyboard, you can scale the faces down by 0.530. Press E on the keyboard to Extrude the top faces. I pressed Z on the keyboard to restrict the Extrude to the Z, or the Top, axis. Then move the mouse up a bit until the top faces form a stem. I extruded mine again, scaled it down a bit and extruded again.
Next, zoom in by moving the Scroll Wheel on your Mouse forward. I moved to far away from the pumpkin. To fix this, I held down the Shift Key and the Scroll Wheel on the Mouse and moved the screen until I was happy with the adjustment.
Hitting E again, I Extruded the Stem a bit more, then Scaled down 0.500. Then, Extrude the Stem a bit more, then Rotate. To Rotate, hit R on the keyboard. I restricted the Rotation to the X axis and hit 45 on the keyboard to rotate the stem 45 degrees.

Step 4: Step 4

Now we have a sphere with a stem. That’s great, but what about the pumpkin? All in due course!
Now press A on the keyboard. This will deselect the pumpkin. Now click the Left Mouse Button to select the face on the top of the pumpkin, just below the stem. While holding the Shift Key, select all the faces down that side of the pumpkin. Now, the last few faces at the bottom of the pumpkin are outside of our reach unless we rotate the pumpkin. My personal preference is to rotate the View. Go to View at the bottom of the screen and choose Bottom. Now we can select the remaining faces.
Now go to View Front and start the process again. But this time, choose every other side of the pumpkin until you have something that looks like mine.
HINT: If you accidentally select the wrong face, like I did multiple times, there is a way to deselect the face without losing all your work. Hold the Left Mouse Button and the Shift Key and select the mishit face again until it is no longer highlighted in orange.
Now click the Left Mouse Button to select the face on the top of the pumpkin. While holding the Shift Key, select all the faces down that side of the pumpkin. Now, the last few faces at the bottom of the pumpkin are outside of our reach unless we rotate the pumpkin. My personal preference is to rotate the View. Go to View at the bottom of the screen and choose Bottom. Now we can select the remaining faces.
Now go to View Front and start the process again. But this time, choose every other side of the pumpkin until you have something that looks like mine.
Now, with each alternate face still selected, hit E to extrude, but don’t hit anything. Hit S this time to scale the faces down by 0.945.

Step 5: Step 5

Now for the fun part! The face!
Go to View, and select Front.  Hit A to deselect everything. Then, select a face to make the first eye. Hit S to scale it down as you see fit. I used 0.750. Next, zoom in and extrude the face down to your liking. Repeat the process on the next alternating face.
Next choose another row of faces for the mouth. Be sure to select the small edges where the pumpkin is sunken in. Extrude the smile down. And we are done with the face!

Step 6: Step 6

Now, I am going to add a subdivision surface to the pumpkin to even out the edges. To do this, pull the right side of the screen out so that a whole row of options shows. Go to the icon shaped like a wrench. Then, hit the Add Modifier button. Choose the Subdivision Surface option. I set mine to View: 4 and Render: 4. But you can do what you see fit.
Now we can add color. To do this, choose the faces you want to add color to. I’m starting with the stem. First, I selected the stem. Then, I went to the Add Material button on the right side of the screen. It looks like a white circle. Choose New and select the color. Hit the white rectangle. A color wheel will appear. I used a green color for my stem, but your own color is entirely up to you! To change the color while still in Blender, go to the Settings tab and change the viewport color to see what the rendered object will look like. To get the same color as before, click on the eyedropper tool on the right and drag it over to the first rectangle where you chose your stem color.
As you can see, my whole pumpkin turned green. Odds are, yours did, too. No worries! That only happened because we have not yet assigned a color to the pumpkin’s body or eyes. Then hit the Assign button.
(To make the face selection easier, I deactivated the modifier option. I’ll activate it later.)
After I selected the face, I added another color by hitting the plus sign in the upper right corner. After assigning the color to the face, I’m going to select the rest of the pumpkin. This will take awhile…
HINT: Since the rest of mine, and maybe your, pumpkin is still green, I had to select the faces I wanted to color, hit the plus button to create another color, choose the color I want my pumpkin to be, and hit Assign.

Step 7: Step 7

Now that my pumpkin is completely colored, I’m going to reinstate the Subdivision Surface Modifier.
Now we are done! Thanks for viewing!

Comments

About This Instructable

1,375views

2favorites

License:

Bio: I am currently in the process of covering La-La Land with my magical, time-traveling unicorn. Feel free to leave a message!
More by Coldfire1215:Bear Hug OrnamentBetta Basics with Phoenix and JackCamera Critters
Add instructable to: