Introduction: 3D Milling a Wooden Cup...

My local hardware store recently offered cheap spruce boards.
Well... most of the stuff was actually unusable but the price was too tempting and one of the boards showed a nice grain pattern. After sifting throug the rest of the pallet I finally found 3 boards I liked and decided to try a Finish "Kuksa"...

Step 1: Modelling...

  • The cup is modeled in Alibre Design. Quite simple and done in just a few minutes...
  • If you like you can download the model and all other files in the "Projects" section at www.estlcam.com.

Step 2: Cutting and Glueing Blanks...

  • To save material and cutting time I've decided to cut slightly oversized blanks rather than machining a rectangular block...
  • The cup is about 85mm high so the best five 18mm blanks are selected and glued together...

Step 3: Alignment Template...

  • To make alignment easy the cups outline is cut into the spoil board...
  • Then the whole block is glued to the spoild board with 5 minute expoxy resin...
    Bad Idea??? Well wait until later ;-)

Step 4: Machining the Upper Side...

  • The tool I've used for roughing is acutally not long enough to cut down to the bottom.
    But it is long enough to clear the inside and reach a level deep enough to pass the largest dimensions in the X/Y plane so it doesn't matter because we can later flip the part and machine the rest from the other side...
  • Finishing is done with a ball nose end mill...

Step 5: Releasing the Cup...

  • So how do we separate the cup from the spoil board?
    Well... many fast curing epoxy resins are heat sensitive and will get soft at temperatures above 100°C. If you put them into the oven and wait a few minutes the cup will just fall off... But check your resin first - I've used "Krick 5 Minuten Epoxy" and "Uhu Sofortfest" will also work but some will not...
  • Another solution is non-waterproof wood glue...

Step 6: Machining the Other Side...

  • This time precise placement is absolutely crucial.
    If you're off by 0.1mm you'll have to sand a lot and if you're off by 1mm you can throw the part into the bin...
    So again I've cut a snugly fitting template to align the cup automatically with perfect precision...
  • My template cut is 5mm deep. To get the correct shape I've just created a temporary cut view where the topmost 5mm are removed...

Step 7: Roughing and Finishing the Other Side...

Step 8: And Finally the Handle...

  • Again a template is cut to align the handle perfectly...
  • For the handle hole I've created a separate STL file showing just the hole and put the origin into its center...

Step 9: Final Steps...

  • After machining the cup is sanded to remove the remaining glue and get a nice surface finish...
  • Finally I've applied walnut oil to highlight the woods grain (use only walnut or linseed oil - most other vegetable oils will spoil)...

Comments

author
Kyleluvspets (author)2015-08-19

I believe this is called a kuksa.

author
kekker70 (author)2015-08-17

Very good, this I will make.

Thanks

Ken

author
jkimball (author)2015-08-14

Why not mill each blank individually, and then glue them together? You could take slices of your model set for the thickness of your boards, and go from there.

This would mean that you could work with a smaller rough cut, and not worry about the ultimate depth of the cup- it could be as deep as you like.

If you kept the blanks attached to the board with a few tabs, you could even ensure that they were properly registered, so fewer worries about flipping them over.

The downside would be the more complicated finishing and gluing elements, but it should be at least comparable to what you have to do now.

author
SpoonMax (author)2015-08-14

A great idea, well executed. However I think the wild grain patterns are so chaotic that they detract from the overall picture. Just too much going on.

author
66legion (author)SpoonMax2015-08-14

I understand what you're saying however I think that adds to the charm of it.. different strokes for different folks I guess.

author
66legion (author)2015-08-14

that looks really cool. I'd expect that to be expensive if I saw that in a store. u got skills my friend. well done

author
hogthrob (author)2015-08-14

that is the most elaborate cup I have ever seen! good ible

author
Josehf Murchison (author)2015-08-13

Very nice.

author
jjdebenedictis (author)2015-08-13

Spectacular! The grain patterns really did turn out gorgeous.

author
alphausb (author)2015-08-13

cool stuff!

author
seamster (author)2015-08-13

Very impressive work, and the grain patterns are wild!

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