Step 8: And lastly...

Before you actually roast with a basket, make sure it won't lose any beans. Put a batch of beans in the basket,(1/4 - 1/3 full), and rotate without heat for several minutes. This will show you most any problem that the basket may have.

Some things to consider when ordering green beans:

I always add the cost of shipping to the cost of the beans and divide by the pounds of beans to get the cost per pound. This cost per pound is very influential when I'm looking to buy green beans.

A first time roaster shouldn't be afraid to order 5 lbs. of one type of coffee to start, I suggest to search for sampler kits of green beans. Some sites do offer this.

This is where I started out. I ordered 5 different 5lb. bags, free shipping with 25lbs or more).
They have sampler packs as well.

The next address is where I ordered my last 50lb bag of coffee.

The Kona coffee came from:
I purchased 2lbs. and we enjoy this expensive coffee once a month or so.
My next exotic coffee will probably be Jamaican Blue Mountain. The buying of expensive coffee is very limited in our budget.

And you might want to check into "Kopi Luwak", or "Civet coffee". This is the most expensive coffee in the world according to what I've read. But if you look it up you'll see why the Bob family won't be ordering any! The process that these beans go through before shipping is different, I must say!

I hope that I have been able to give you some ideas, or inspirations.

And please rate what you have read, please rate it for me.

Thank you very much.

Original West Bend poppery hot very hot air popcorn popper works wonders as coffee roaster -
<p>such great evolutionary process certainly gives me a good trajectory for my own experimentation. Thanks! I will add that you should not exclude Kopi Luwak out of hand. My wife and I were introduced to this when we received a gift of a pound of it. After making some and raving over it (honestly exceeds any bestest coffees I've ever had!!!) we were informed, somewhat playfully, of the 'process'. It didn't changed the flavor! It still gets roasted at high temps and has boiling water pressed through the grounds so it's quite safe. If you try it you will imagine some sort of excuse to drink it as budget allows. Back when we got our first batch the cost flew up to $1800 per lb due to the horrible tsunami which wiped out most of the plantations and animals where it was produced. Fortunately after five plus years they are recovering and the beans can be had for as little as $150 lb..cheaper than my favorite tea. I scrimp and save in many ways but I demand my foolish pleasures!</p>
This is great. I really thing that if <a href="http://www.tobysestate.com" rel="nofollow">brooklyn coffee roasters</a> would look into this things would be a lot better.
brilliant reuse of materials, I would have never thought of using a rotisserie! I agree that all the sub $500 roasters are pretty lame so I went the standard popcorn popper route.&nbsp; I like your larger batch solution better. Ii made a little <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0Y5ojdVWxE" rel="nofollow">video on roasting</a> in the popper but it is nothing new. ..unlike your rotisserie which I would love to see a video of it in action! and thanks for the links!<br /> Also: for local green coffee beans in a city try going to a Kenyan or Ethiopian grocery store. They love their coffee and sell several native varieties at my store. They even have pans for roasting it on your stove top - which I have never done but sounds fun (and smoky).<br /> <br /> Thanks again!<br /> <br />
Chippy,<br /> <br /> Thanks for the feedback! I'll work on a video when I roast next, in the next day or two, and then post it for you and others to see. <br /> <br /> I've roasted over 200 pounds of coffee in that little roaster. Plus several pork loins, turkey breasts, and various other things, and not once have I had a problem with smells or flavor from anything that is roasted in it. I have been really impressed with it. The coffee smoke does stain everything, you'll see when I post the video. It's much darker now than in the pics shown here.<br /> <br /> Thanks!!!<br /> <br /> pb<br />
killer! thanks for the video! and it is AWESOME to know you didn't make a uni-tasker - this thing pulls double duty roasting meats!<br>may i suggest posting it to the forums of coffee roasters like sweet marias?
Here ya go:<br /> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HS5Z83LDJlE<br /> <object height="344" width="425"> <param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/HS5Z83LDJlE&amp;hl=en_US&amp;fs=1&amp;" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> <param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><embed allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" height="344" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/HS5Z83LDJlE&amp;hl=en_US&amp;fs=1&amp;" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" /></object><br /> This is about 8 short videos put together. Sorry I'm not a better camera man. :-)<br /> 4 cups of green beans yield about 8 cups roasted beans. Total roasting time is a little over an hour. That could be cut down alot if the roaster held heat better, but I won't modify mine unless I get another one.<br /> <br /> Hope you like the video.<br /> <br /> pb<br /> <br />
I reap the benefits of all this coffee roasting and the store grinds can't come close - Best coffee ever! (I'm still trying to come up with a use for the chaff). Ms. Bob
Thanks, this coffee roasting get's more and more interesting. I buy preroasted for years and use a Bialetti Moka and a Zassenhaus hand grinder. Your roast crontraptions are really cool :).
Thanks tecneeq for you comment, I really appreciate it as this is my first time and I'm still new at it.