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A cross-cut sled for the table saw is a must have jig for any serious woodworker. More accurate than a miter gauge, it also makes cross-cutting any board easy and safe. However, in order to provide the proper results it must be built with care. I made my first sled last year, following a plan in a popular woodworking magazine. Yet, in a matter of months, the maple runners swelled so much that the sled wouldn't slide in the miter slots. That's when my type "A" personality kicked in and I became determined to learn all I could about the ins and outs of building a cross-cut sled that would last. That research forms the basis for the tips and techniques presented in this instructable. And, while I can't take credit for any of these great ideas, I think you will find the insights of some very talented woodworkers helpful.

Step 1: Tip 1: Milling the Sled Runners

The runners ride in the two miter slots and guide the sled as the workpiece is pushed past the blade. They are most often made from hardwood such as maple or white oak, however, steel, aluminium or plastic runners are also options. Wood runners are more commonly suggested, most likely, because of the moderate cost. The disadvantage of wood runners is that the wood can swell with changes in humidity making smooth travel through the miter slots difficult or impossible.

Tip #1: Since most wood movement is with the grain, mill the sled runners with the grain running vertically as shown in the photo. This will minimize or eliminate side to side expansion of the runner in the miter slot.

Miter slots can vary slightly in size but most are 3/4" wide x 3/8" deep. Most plans call for milling the runners for a snug yet smooth sliding fit with no side to side play (also called slop). However, if the runner width swells too much it can become a problem and, as I mentioned, this is where I ran into trouble with my first sled. The good news: Tip number two allows some wiggle room when milling the runners to width.

Note: The height of the runners should be less than 3/8" so there will be some space under the runner for sawdust debris
<p>I have that same saw and have been wanting to build a sled for it. Do you mind if I ask what the base dimension is?</p>
You can make the sled base any size (within reason) that will best serve your needs. The base of my sled is 22&quot; x 33&quot;.
<p>Adam Savage's crosscut sled has a red danger zone marked on the back side of the sled, that might be a helpful addition.</p>
<p>Very nice sled, great photos.</p><p>My only major concern with this design is safety:</p><p>1. I would highly recommend a blade guard to cover the blade when the sled passes over the blade. It's too easy to have a finger in that location when you are focused on that perfect cut you need to make. I would not feel comfortable using a sled without that, because I really like my fingers.</p><p>2. this second point is less critical, but on my sled, I have two sticks, fixed on top of the fences, running along both sides of the blade. They create a bit of a &quot;no finger zone&quot;, they prevent stuff from falling on the turning blade and they form a bit of a cage preventing big pieces being kicked back directly in your face in case something goes wrong.</p><p>I have an old instructable on my sled you can look up. Thanks for sharing.</p>
<p>Nice!</p>
Hey, nice sled! I see you have makita contractor saw. What do you make of it? Would you recommend? Cherrs
Actually it is a Bosch contractor saw. It's a great saw. I highly recommend it.
I live in a country where TS options are quite limited. I am quite happy with the Makita saw. But you need to make your own sleds and jigs to get some accuracy out of it.
excellent,just bought myself a new kickass table saw so ill defo have s go at this,cheers dude
<p>Kent. Great article. I have the same table saw and notice you have the longer side of the sled to the right of the blade. I've never done any cutting with longer stock on the &quot;fence&quot; side of the saw so it's a philosophical point with me. Do you find it doesn't really matter? Obviously with the way this saw top is constructed your method fits better as the table doesn't extend as far from the left of the saw blade as it does to the right.</p>
Every table saw I've ever seen has the majority of the table's surface to the right of the blade. You can certainly build a crosscut sled with a larger work surface on the left side of the blade if it suits your needs. However, I would resist making it too big as I don't believe a significant portion of the sled should be unsupported by extending over the edge of the table (IMHO).
<p>A slice of nylon chopping board makes great runners and they will never change size.</p>
<p>I was just scrolling down to recommend the same thing. The UHMW used for them is very stable and creates an almost frictionless runner.</p>
<p>The book _Measure Twice, Cut Once_ recommends lignum vitae for the sled runners because it's a naturally oily wood. I personally have not built a<br> sled yet, but I plan to soon. Thanks for a great post!</p>
<p>The book _Measure Twice, Cut Once_ recommends lignum vitae for the sled runners because it's a naturally oily wood. I personally have not built a<br> sled yet, but I plan to soon. Thanks for a great post!</p>
<p>Kent,</p><p>a nicely put together instructable. Thanks. I have made a few of these, they are great.</p><p>Tip #2 can be taken a little further. In step 2, you pull the two sled halves together, therefore only <a href="http://cdn.instructables.com/FIB/M4OK/HLZRQNUH/FIBM4OKHLZRQNUH.MEDIUM.jpg" rel="nofollow">ONE edge of each runner</a> contacts the side of the table slot. Therefore, make the runners say 11/16&quot; wide, they will never bind. The non-contact edge does not have to be smooth, so ripping a runner off a pice of dresses timber is quite OK, no need to thickness it. </p><p>The nail gun is my best friend, so when attaching the runner to the sled, place the runner, smooth edge towards the saw blade, and nail both ends. Now, pull the smooth edge against a straight edge (I use an old Stabilo casts and machined spirit level, you use a piece of MDF) and nail the centre. The runner is now straight, so add another 6 or 8 nails to keep it straight.</p><p>I noted that domino88 added a <a href="http://cdn.instructables.com/FH6/QQ6F/H11WJEV2/FH6QQ6FH11WJEV2.LARGE.jpg" rel="nofollow">blade guard</a>. I just drove a few nails into the top of the fence in the danger zone, but I didn't drive them quite home, leaving 1/4&quot; protruding. Grabbing a handful of nail heads reminds me to move my fingers from the danger zone, and I can still count to 10 :-)</p>
<p>wood fibres swell and contract with moisture content as you mention, but not in the way described in &quot;Tip 1&quot;. The sample you have shown is dimensionaly stable only in its length. Its thickness and width (as shown) are subject to expansion. Imagine you take one wood fibre and imerse it in water. It won't grow longer, but it will swell out concentricly like a bicycle tyre inner tube being inflated. Each of the fibres in a length of timber behave like this. </p>
Great tips, thanks! I really need to make a new sled. My old one has too much side to side movement. Tips learned from here will be great help. Take care
<p>Very nice sled, great photos.</p><p>My only major concern with this design is safety:</p><p>1. I would highly recommend a blade guard to cover the blade when the sled passes over the blade. It's too easy to have a finger in that location when you are focused on that perfect cut you need to make. I would not feel comfortable using a sled without that, because I really like my fingers.</p><p>2. this second point is less critical, but on my sled, I have two sticks, fixed on top of the fences, running along both sides of the blade. They create a bit of a &quot;no finger zone&quot;, they prevent stuff from falling on the turning blade and they form a bit of a cage preventing big pieces being kicked back directly in your face in case something goes wrong.</p><p>I have an old instructable on my sled you can look up. Thanks for sharing.</p>
<p>I made my sled out of birch ply that was left over from a project and cut up through the top with the saw works great I have seen many different ones and think it was one of the most useful shop jigs you can make for a table saw!</p><p>I used some salvaged hard maple for the runners which I glued and screwed to the underside. They were cut so as to keep the sled ridding just a little bit clear of the saw itself and to control the swelling and ease sliding I used a heat gun to saturate the runners with paraffin wax and always use paste wax on the saw.</p><p>why did you make the sled ride on the saw that way?</p><p>always trying to learn new things</p><p>uncle frogy</p>
<p>Great idea, I use MDF a lot and over time it will absorb moisture and swell, particularly around the edges so I give all my jigs a few coats of varnish or shellac now and they last years.</p>
<p>I attached a thumb reminder &quot;3/4 by2&quot; scrap,so I wonever let my thumb stray into path of blade.</p>
<p>What does this thing do?</p>
<p>good post --- i saved it in favorites!!</p>
<p>j</p>
<p>The set of plans I used included a little three-sided box that sticks out about 3 inches on the outside of the fence that is next to the operator. When one makes a cut, the blade may cut beyond the face and the box prevents an inadvertent hand from being near the area. Don't put any screws in the possible blade path. We all think about safety but old age, inexperience, rushing or slippages can interrupt the best of us.</p>
<p>I may be old school, but have maintained a strict policy of never allowing MDF in my shop, due to stability inconsistency, Formaldehyde content ( or other toxins used in processing, and just hating the way it looks. I would suggest using Baltic birch, or Apple Ply for the base of the jig. Sure, it's much more expensive, so it will cost you maybe $10.00 more, but, when you stretch that over the 20 or 30 years you will have the sled, it doesn't seem like such an extravangance. </p>
<p>My YouTube buddy Nick Ferry also has plans for building a very accurate sled using Rockler tracks. Something to consider, and a great build to boot :)</p>
<p>I have a question about mdf. I have watched Norm Abrams build a mailbox post and bracket from mdf. Now, you are building a crosscut sled with it. The product I find at Home Depot looks like pressed paper and is heavy as all get out. I can't believe it would have either the moisture resistance to be a mailbox post exposed to the weather or a useful sled subject to abrasion and wear. If there are different grades of mdf, what are they and where can it be found?</p>
<p>Norm didn't make it out of MDF. It was MDO, which is an entirely different beast and used by signmakers, and intended for outdoor use.</p><p>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium_density_overlay_panel</p>
Thank you for this. I have been thinking about a crosscut sled. I did buy a book on tablesaws. It mentions European table saws have a slide on one-half of the table that allows the whole half of the table to act like a sled. Those are some really big table saws.
<p>I have slides also on both sides of my small Ryobi 10 in BTS10S saw.It works well but need better center runners.I am also complete new at this.Thank you for all the tips.</p>
<p>I am disable and only get 900.00 a month so everything I do is on the extremely cheap side including dumpster diving for wood..lol.</p>
Woodworking magazines and the Woodsmith Shop TV show on public television all recommend using MDF or hardboard for a large variety of shop built accessory jigs. MDF is extremely strong and I've even built a tool storage cabinet from an magazine project plan using 3/4&quot; MDF. 1/4&quot; hardboard is a similar material that Is also used for building jigs ( and, for example, as drawer bottoms). Both materials are a combination of fine wood fibers (sawdust) and glue fused together with heat and pressure. Both materials come in varying thicknesses and the appearance or color may vary by manufacturer but I have never heard of different grades of MDF or hardboard.
<p>Tip #3, step 4 states: &quot;4) Clean up the the faces (and ends if necessary) by using a finishing blade and making a fine cut pass on the table saw&quot;. </p><p>What is a &quot;finishing blade&quot;? Is that just a table saw blade for fine cuts?</p>
Right on. The more teeth, the cleaner (smoother) the cut. The blade I used has 80 teeth. You just want to skim the workpiece with the blade, removing just enough material to even out and smooth all sides of the fences.
Great detail Ken. That takes a lot of time.
<p>I got my cutting boards at Sams Club pretty cheap.</p>
Kent, for the fences did you consider using the face of multiple, glued 1/2&quot; MDF pieces rather than the edges? Wouldn't that eliminate the need to true up the face with a scraper and table saw, and give you a nice smooth surface? <br><br>thanks,<br><br>Alex
All the tips I suggested in my instructable were compiled from woodworking magazine articles (like fine woodworking) or associated websites so I'm not going to second guess the pro's. However, experimenting and trying different techniques is part of the fun of woodworking.
Interesting project! <br> <br>A hopefully helpful comment - have you considered using poly plastic runners as guides? I had the same problems with wood runners: shrinking, swelling, splintering, wearing grooves, etc. <br> <br>I saw a big $$ factory sled with plastic runners- polyethelene. I didn't want to spend good money on plastic- I found that a 1/2&quot; thick poly kitchen cutting board would provide all the plastic strips I needed. This poly plastic material is easy to cut with regular shop tools, including a jointer! My first set of poly runners lasted longer than the sled! <br> <br>When I visit the thrift stores, I always look over the kitchen wares area and I have collected a good number of poly cutting boards, a few almost a full inch thick! Of course, one could pay full price for some virgin poly, but it's not necessary. <br> <br>Keep having fun in your shop, but keep it safe!
<p>I like using poly for the runners also, but one hint. Don't use screws with a tapered head to attach them. Make sure the screws have a squared shoulder that will fit flat in the mounting hole.</p><p>The poly is so soft that a screw with a tapered head will push the poly material out on the sides. This makes it stick in the miter slots.</p><p>I got my cutting boards at Sams Club pretty cheap.</p>
Another cool idea! Thanks for your input. Definitely worth trying.
<p>look this</p><p><a href="http://www.eftiaxa.gr/2014/11/13/%CF%83%CF%85%CF%81%CF%8C%CE%BC%CE%B5%CE%BD%CE%BF-%CF%84%CF%81%CE%B1%CF%80%CE%AD%CE%B6%CE%B9-%CE%B4%CE%B9%CF%83%CE%BA%CE%BF%CF%80%CF%81%CE%AF%CE%BF%CE%BD%CE%BF%CF%85-cross-cut-sled/" rel="nofollow">http://www.eftiaxa.gr/2014/11/13/%CF%83%CF%85%CF%8...</a></p><p>and the Trigonometry details in the regulation of Cross Cut Sled with the 4 cuts</p><p><a href="http://www.eftiaxa.gr/2015/03/19/%CE%BB%CE%B5%CF%80%CF%84%CE%BF%CE%BC%CE%AD%CF%81%CE%B5%CE%B9%CE%B5%CF%82-%CF%84%CF%81%CE%B9%CE%B3%CF%89%CE%BD%CE%BF%CE%BC%CE%B5%CF%84%CF%81%CE%AF%CE%B1%CF%82-%CF%83%CF%84%CE%B7%CE%BD-%CF%81%CF%8D/" rel="nofollow">http://www.eftiaxa.gr/2015/03/19/%CE%BB%CE%B5%CF%8...</a></p>
<p>This may not be of much help now, and maybe it won't matter to you. But on most saws, you can adjust the table in relationship to the blade. On most of the ones I've done, it's a simple job requiring you to loosen the table fasteners just a bit, then tap it around until you get a nice true reading with a dial indicator mounted in a miter slot. </p>
Great instructable! Do you have any trouble with the MDF warping or expanding?
MDF <em><strong>and</strong></em> Plywood are both very stable materials. For this reason you don't need to worry about warping or expansion when using them on a project.
My question is I have a craftsman circular saw mounted under a 3/4 piece of wood. The miter slots are of wood. My sled rides free and clear. I have run out with a brand new blade. A small width piece of wood is real close with a carpenters square but as the width <br>increases so does accuracy. How do I compensate with run out of circular saw? Any ideas would be helpful. Kevin

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