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Step 3: Fire Plough

Fire Plough
This produces its own tinder by pushing out particles of wood ahead of the friction. Step One Cut a groove in the softwood fireboard, then plough or rub the tip of a slightly harder shaft up and down the groove. The friction will push out dusty particles of the fireboard, which will ignite as the temperature increases.
<p>The built-in striking blade takes off enough material to start a fire but will not cause excessive wear, can be flipped over to show a fresh striking surface. Wetfire tinder is typically composed of paraffin wax, which is immune to moisture and a flammable, smokeless material.. <a href="http://patriotdeal.com/collections/all/products/flint-firestarte" rel="nofollow">http://patriotdeal.com/collections/all/products/flint-firestarte</a>r Use this code &quot;PD10&quot;and save 10%.</p>
<p>check this out</p><p>https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=co.studika.firecraft</p>
Cool instructable! If you were in a cold climate which would be your favorite choice or choices of primitive fire methods?
<p>Some organized<br>thoughts of firemaking Developments , time line for interested history<br>bushcrafter buffs ;-)</p><p>Primitive<br>Fire skills =(before 8th Century BC) = </p><p>.................................Handdrill and Bow Drill fire making</p><p>................................Stonefire making (flint on flint)</p><p>............................... Fireplough </p><p>............................... Firesaw </p><p>.............................. Lightning. </p><p>................................Charmaterial<br><br>Classical Fire skills =(iron age 8th century BC Europe) <br>.............................. ParabolicMirrors/Reflectors/BurningMirrors(Ancient Egypt-Present) </p><p>.............................. Metaltinderbox with Flint &amp; Steel</p><p>............................. <br>Magnifying lens (13th century by Roger Bacon) </p><p>.............................. Matches1805 </p><p>.............................. Flintlock Lighter 1823 <br><br>Modern Fire skills = 1900-Present date</p><p>................................BicLighter (1973 ) </p><p>................................FerroRod (inventor Carl Auer von Welsbach 19th Century) </p><p>............................... FresnoLens (mid 19th century French physicist, Augustin Fresnel) </p><p>...............................9v Battery/radio transistor battery (1950's)&amp; SteelWool (1890's)<br>................................Glycerin (1940's) &amp; Potassium Permanganate<br>( 1950's)</p><p>Cheers ;-) </p>
<p>match or a lighter maybe</p>
It was a primitive fire starting instructable
This is an awesome instructable. However, it is copied almost directly from this article (except step 6): http://www.fieldandstream.com/photos/gallery/survival/fire/2006/10/seven-ways-light-fire-without-match?photo=0#node-1000014415 <br>Maybe you should cite it so you don't get in trouble.
charcloth is not actually set on fire, throw some in a metal container and then throw near fire to produce
There are actually a few ways of making char cloth. One is to put a cotton rag or material such as a piece of blue jeans into an airtight metal containder and put it in the fire. Another is to burn it and then stomp it out when it's a dark brown color.
Correct, the point is to burn off some of the carbon so that it <em>doesn't</em> combust. To set them on fire is a silly and&nbsp;inefficient&nbsp;waste of material. But, the author can do whatever works for him.&nbsp;
A magnifying glass isn't primitive enough for you?
Hmm, didn't know they had magnifying glasses during paleo times.
If your speaking to me a magnifying glass is about as Sherlock Holmes as I wish to get, but no, it's not what I would call primitive.
Might be hard to have charcloth without the fire first. In that case conk works, it is a tree fungus you can pick off the side of a tree and split open. It will hold a spark and smolder. It varies in appearance, but I find it most consistently on birches and beech trees. Google some images.

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