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Step 4: Pump Fire Drill

Pump Fire Drill
The Iroquois invented this ingenious pump drill, which uses a flywheel to generate friction. The crossbar and flywheel are made of hardwood; the spindle and fireboard are made from softwoods (as in the hand drill).

Step One Bore a hole in the center of a rounded piece of hardwood and force the spindle in so that it fits tightly. Select wood for the crossbar and bore a larger hole that will slide freely on the spindle.

Step Two Attach the crossbar to the top of the spindle with a leather thong or sturdy shoelace.

Step Three Wind up the flywheel so that the thong twists around the spindle, then press down. The momentum will rewind the crossbar in the opposite direction. Repeat until friction creates a glowing ember.
<p>The built-in striking blade takes off enough material to start a fire but will not cause excessive wear, can be flipped over to show a fresh striking surface. Wetfire tinder is typically composed of paraffin wax, which is immune to moisture and a flammable, smokeless material.. <a href="http://patriotdeal.com/collections/all/products/flint-firestarte" rel="nofollow">http://patriotdeal.com/collections/all/products/flint-firestarte</a>r Use this code &quot;PD10&quot;and save 10%.</p>
<p>check this out</p><p>https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=co.studika.firecraft</p>
Cool instructable! If you were in a cold climate which would be your favorite choice or choices of primitive fire methods?
<p>Some organized<br>thoughts of firemaking Developments , time line for interested history<br>bushcrafter buffs ;-)</p><p>Primitive<br>Fire skills =(before 8th Century BC) = </p><p>.................................Handdrill and Bow Drill fire making</p><p>................................Stonefire making (flint on flint)</p><p>............................... Fireplough </p><p>............................... Firesaw </p><p>.............................. Lightning. </p><p>................................Charmaterial<br><br>Classical Fire skills =(iron age 8th century BC Europe) <br>.............................. ParabolicMirrors/Reflectors/BurningMirrors(Ancient Egypt-Present) </p><p>.............................. Metaltinderbox with Flint &amp; Steel</p><p>............................. <br>Magnifying lens (13th century by Roger Bacon) </p><p>.............................. Matches1805 </p><p>.............................. Flintlock Lighter 1823 <br><br>Modern Fire skills = 1900-Present date</p><p>................................BicLighter (1973 ) </p><p>................................FerroRod (inventor Carl Auer von Welsbach 19th Century) </p><p>............................... FresnoLens (mid 19th century French physicist, Augustin Fresnel) </p><p>...............................9v Battery/radio transistor battery (1950's)&amp; SteelWool (1890's)<br>................................Glycerin (1940's) &amp; Potassium Permanganate<br>( 1950's)</p><p>Cheers ;-) </p>
<p>match or a lighter maybe</p>
It was a primitive fire starting instructable
This is an awesome instructable. However, it is copied almost directly from this article (except step 6): http://www.fieldandstream.com/photos/gallery/survival/fire/2006/10/seven-ways-light-fire-without-match?photo=0#node-1000014415 <br>Maybe you should cite it so you don't get in trouble.
charcloth is not actually set on fire, throw some in a metal container and then throw near fire to produce
There are actually a few ways of making char cloth. One is to put a cotton rag or material such as a piece of blue jeans into an airtight metal containder and put it in the fire. Another is to burn it and then stomp it out when it's a dark brown color.
Correct, the point is to burn off some of the carbon so that it <em>doesn't</em> combust. To set them on fire is a silly and&nbsp;inefficient&nbsp;waste of material. But, the author can do whatever works for him.&nbsp;
A magnifying glass isn't primitive enough for you?
Hmm, didn't know they had magnifying glasses during paleo times.
If your speaking to me a magnifying glass is about as Sherlock Holmes as I wish to get, but no, it's not what I would call primitive.
Might be hard to have charcloth without the fire first. In that case conk works, it is a tree fungus you can pick off the side of a tree and split open. It will hold a spark and smolder. It varies in appearance, but I find it most consistently on birches and beech trees. Google some images.

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