Introduction: 9 MORE Unusual Tool Storage Methods - Part 2

Picture of 9 MORE Unusual Tool Storage Methods - Part 2

Back in February of 2016, I published an Instructable on 9 Unusual Tool Storage Methods for Your Workshop, which is now one of my most viewed Instructables, with over 100,000 views!

Since I can't stand messy workshops, and got so much positive feedback in part 1, In this Instructable, I'll show part 2, with 9 more unusual ways to store your workshop tools!

Let's get started!


*Pssst! Don't forget to check out more info about the (weird...) giveaway in the comments!

Step 1: "Floating" Pliers/Tweezers Rack

Picture of "Floating" Pliers/Tweezers Rack

I think this one is my favorite tool holder. It looks like it floats, but is actually really strong, and saves me A TON of space!

For my pliers, I drilled a hole into my pegboard, and then epoxied in bent rod. This can hold a lot of pliers, wire cutters, and several more... For my tweezers, I drilled a hole into my pegboard again, and then glued a dowel, which I had previously CA glued a metal rod in the middle. Other than the fact that it's a bit too short, it works really well, and I think it should last me a long time.

Step 2: Drill Storage - a Hole in My Workbench!

Picture of Drill Storage - a Hole in My Workbench!

Drill a hole in your workbench? Yes!

A really simple method for storing your drill is to drill a hole in your workbench, and mount your drill's bit inside the hole. This way you can return it quickly, and return it when you're done drilling.

I think I'll do this as soon as I fix my drill...

Step 3: Salvaged Metal Rods

Picture of Salvaged Metal Rods

I have quite a bit of ~1mm rods, which I have salvaged from CD/DVD Rom's. These are extremely useful for storing all sorts of tools such as Hand-Planes, hammers, and mallets. I also use a bigger rod for storing all four of my spring clamps.

Alternatively, you can also use wooden dowels

Step 4: Container Tool Storage!

Picture of Container Tool Storage!

For almost a year, I've been Storing my small screwdrivers with a strip of magnets to the wall. It worked really well, except for the fact that the magnets weren't strong enough.

I secured the small plastic container to the wall with screws and washers, and then added some CA glue for extra strength

Bonus: Can you guess where this plastic container came from?

Step 5: World's Biggest Box Joints!

Picture of World's Biggest Box Joints!

Worlds biggest box joints? Hmmm...

I cut a small piece of wood and then used a handsaw and a chisel to make a "box joint". This can be done easily with either a table-saw or a bandsaw too. I then screwed it into my pegboard/wall

This method works really well for storing mallets and hammers, but it can also work well for storing clamps, and other similar tools.

Step 6: Clamp Clamps to the Edge of Your Workbench

Picture of Clamp Clamps to the Edge of Your Workbench

Clamping clamps to the edge of your workbench- Perhaps the world's easiest way of storing tools...

This method should work for all types of clamps, but it works really well for spring clamps, bar-clamps, kant-twist clamps, and wooden hand-screw clamps

Step 7: Metal Book Dividers for Shelves - Hand-Plane Holders!

Picture of Metal Book Dividers for Shelves - Hand-Plane Holders!

I'm not sure how I thought of this, but my previous and-plane holder was a metal bookshelf divider...

I screwed the metal divider into my pegboard, and placed all of my planes onto it. The one I used can hold both of my wooden hand-planes without dulling them thanks to the hole in the middle. See both pictures for more information...

Step 8: Square Screw Hooks

Picture of Square Screw Hooks

Again?

While I did show this method in part one, I thought I would put it in this Instructable too, since I think that is is either the best, or the second best option.

I use square screw hooks to hold many of my tools, such as hammers, my anvil, my speed square, my bar-clamps, and many more.

Step 9: Holes in Wood! - Drill-Bit Organizer

Picture of Holes in Wood! - Drill-Bit Organizer

I've seen several people make these, and that's because they're really easy to make. All you need is a drill, and if you have drill-bits, you should already have one...

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If you haven't seen part one, make sure to see 9 Unusual Tool Storage Methods for Your Workshop (Part 1)!

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I read and reply to ALL comments, so make sure to leave your suggestions, upgrades and improvements, and any other ideas in the comments below!

Comments

Yonatan24 (author)2016-08-21

Do you want a FREE PRO Membership?


I'm challenging YOU to think of a tool that you don't know how to store (store efficiently, hang on a wall/pegboard, etc...).

Here's what you have to do to be able to receive the free membership:

1. Follow me on Instructables

2. Click the orange "Vote" button at the top right corner (At no cost for you, this supports me, my projects, and my future Instructables, since not all of them are cheap to build)

2. Reply to this message with the tool you chose (also pictures if needed)

If I (or anyone else) can't think of a way for storing the tool, you win a free PRO membership to Instructables! (I will send you the code in a PM)

I cannot store my drill tool efficiently without harming my pet cat :(

And...

How am I supposed to help you with that?

hehe can you help design one for me pretty cat please :)

I need more iformation so I can help you...

Also, what did you want to collaborate on?

Stertheder (author)Yonatan242016-08-28

Where should i put my ego? It seems to get in the way all the time, as i rarely use it due to my humble-ness. :P

But on a serious note, though not a tool (and therefore not applicable to the winning a membership deal) i have a bit of foam (egg-crate/matress foam) and i am not sure the best method of storage. (5 sheets of 1" thick 40"x80" foam, roughly)
If it gets wet, it molds horribly. This takes cardboard down a notch (stored it in a shed all summer in a box and lost a piece due to mold)
It can compress, but 5 sheets takes a lot of force, and i do not have a vacuum pump nor air-tight container.

I am a college student in a mobile home, so storage is limited (I have inside, and an 8x8x6' shed)

Any ideas?

Yonatan24 (author)Stertheder2016-08-29

There's a product called Kaizen Foam that many woodworkers recommend. The only problem is that it looks pretty expensive...

I don't know what tools you need to store, but maybe these one of these pegboard options might work for you:

https://www.instructables.com/id/Compact-Pegboard-T...

https://www.instructables.com/id/Build-a-Peg-Board-...

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/31525266111858069/

https://www.instructables.com/id/Peg-Board-Tool-Cab...

Yonatan24 (author)Yonatan242016-08-29
Stertheder (author)Yonatan242016-08-30

Those are some awesome storage ideas, and i think i will combine several of those ideas to make the most out of my little shed space! Thank you very much!

77bacon77 (author)Yonatan242016-08-25

I can never seem to find a way to store my jigsaw and circular saws (don't have cases) effectivly w/o taking up unnesicary space.

Yonatan24 (author)77bacon772016-08-26

Check out the cubbies that John made here:

77bacon77 (author)Yonatan242016-08-26

Thanks

madenairy (author)Yonatan242016-08-25

I hav a 5ft long scythe - its yusefull for clearing gardens and a pane in the backside to stor!

Lovetra (author)madenairy2016-08-25

I also have a scythe and on the outside of my garage on a ledger board ( a 2" x 10" x 12 foot attached to the studs of garage, under the protected eves, I have attached various sizes of pvc/abs pipe (depending on the tool it is to hold) of various lengths. My scythe is one of those tools along with shovels, picks, rakes stc. They are all outside tools stored where they are usually used.

Yonatan24 (author)Lovetra2016-08-25

I'm confused. Can you send me a picture of where you want to store it?

Something like these, maybe: http://cdn1.tmbi.com/TFH/Projects/FH060611_002_GAR... , https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/3f/f8/5c...

Yonatan24 (author)madenairy2016-08-25

Square screw hooks.

How big is it?

benditright (author)Yonatan242016-08-25

I would like you to store the following tool:

microscope

Cheers, benditright

Yonatan24 (author)benditright2016-08-25

How big is the microscope? How much does it weigh? What shape is it?How often do you use it? Where in your workshop can you store it?

Can you show me a picture of it?

muddog15 (author)Yonatan242016-08-21

flywheel/gear puller... those damn things lay everywhere!

Yonatan24 (author)muddog152016-08-21

Never heard of those, is that a tool?

From what I see in Google images, I think this can be stored with Square screw hooks. One on each (segmented?) top part. I'm not sure how big they are, but step 4 might work too.

Hope this helps! :)

SherylinRM (author)2017-03-17

The thing that holds the planes is my favorite.

You can set them down and keep the blades safe.

VERY cool idea :)

Yonatan24 (author)SherylinRM2017-03-17

Thanks. You can make them out of wood too!

SherylinRM (author)Yonatan242017-03-20

Aha, yet another great idea. Thanks :)

uzro (author)2016-08-31

你的设计很实用,而且也不费力。试试这款造型,你觉得怎么样?

Yonatan24 (author)uzro2016-09-01

Google translate: Your design is very practical and is not laborious. Try this style, do you think?

That? That's pegboard...

PhilS43 (author)2016-08-25

Take one 2" x 1" batten to fix to the wall.

Take some M6 x 100-mm roofing bolts and fix these to the batten at 2" intervals so that the mushroom head sticks out like a coat hook - you will need some penny washers and nut to make the roof bolts stable.

Spend half a day making many loops from nylon or PP cord.

Almost every tool will have something you can pass the loop around.

Hang many tools on each roof bolt and use as many battens as you wish.

I'm willing to bet that there is NO tool short of a fork lift truck that cannot be stored using a little ingenuity.

If you have rafters and joists in a garage, the sky's the limit.

AlM47 (author)PhilS432016-08-30

Details from Phil; You drill a suitable hole through the 1" dimension of the batten. M6 will need 6.5-mm for clearance.On the back face of the batten, counter-bore a recess with enough diameter to take a penny/repair washer of 25-mm diameter plus an M6 nut – if you haven't got a drill press for the Forstener or flat bit, then do the recess first to get the centralising right.Take the roof bolt an load it with one M6 nut and a penny washer for the “show” face of the batten – push it through the hole and put a penny washer and M6 nut on the back so the the bolt thread is flush and not protruding.Tighten (10-mm A/F) the back nut so that the penny washers clamp the batten and give the roof bolt a lot of stability.Fix the batten wherever and fill up with all the awkward tools.If you pass one end of the loop through itself, it becomes self-tightening (look up Prusik loop used in climbing).I haven't found anything in the workshop of reasonable size and weight that you can't do by this method, in fact I have one gareage wall, already battened and ply faced covered in tools and other objects.You can see where everything is and quickly give the tools a spray of WD40 now and again. >> For larger tools you may increase the size of 'batten' and/or bolts & washers.

Yonatan24 (author)PhilS432016-08-26

Interesting... Did you do this to your workshop?

PhilS43 (author)Yonatan242016-08-30

Yes Yonatan
This was the unedited reply to AIM47 who seems to have done a little redaction
"Hello
I thought this was too simple to have to explain in detail, but here it is.
You drill a suitable hole through the 1" dimension of the batten. M6 will need 6.5-mm for clearance.
On the back face of the batten, counter-bore a recess with enough diameter to take a penny/repair washer of 25-mm diameter plus an M6 nut - if you haven't got a drill press for the Forstener or flat bit, then do the recess first to get the centralising right.
Take the roof bolt an load it with one M6 nut and a penny washer for the "show" face of the batten - push it through the hole and put a penny washer and M6 nut on the back so the the bolt thread is flush and not protruding.
Tighten (10-mm A/F) the back nut so that the penny washers clamp the batten and give the roof bolt a lot of stability.
Fix the batten wherever and fill up with all the awkward tools.
If you pass one end of the loop through itself, it becomes self-tightening (look up Prusik loop used in climbing).
I haven't found anything in the workshop of reasonable size and weight that you can't do by this method, in fact I have one gareage wall, already battened and ply faced covered in tools and other objects.
You can see where everything is and quickly give the tools a spray of WD40 now and again.
Coming from an engineering/workshop background, wall spikes etc were commonly used for tools, generally as part of industrial bin systems.
This was a fairly cheap, customisable way of doing it and I hadn't seen it before. You could use just threaded studding, but the bolt head keeps everything in place and the bolts don't need cutting - I use larger versions for stuff like ladders.
Just as an add-on, if you have a lot of stuff like pipes etc. I hang these off the ceiling with ladder hooks and use lengths of "square" plastic gutter strung accross the hooks to stop them rolling off.
Many tools are the Mother of Invention"

AlM47 (author)PhilS432016-08-25

how might one "fix a roofing bolt to the batten?"

PhilS43 (author)AlM472016-08-30

Hello
I thought this was too simple to have to explain in detail, but here it is.
You drill a suitable hole through the 1" dimension of the batten. M6 will need 6.5-mm for clearance.
On the back face of the batten, counter-bore a recess with enough diameter to take a penny/repair washer of 25-mm diameter plus an M6 nut - if you haven't got a drill press for the Forstener or flat bit, then do the recess first to get the centralising right.
Take the roof bolt an load it with one M6 nut and a penny washer for the "show" face of the batten - push it through the hole and put a penny washer and M6 nut on the back so the the bolt thread is flush and not protruding.
Tighten (10-mm A/F) the back nut so that the penny washers clamp the batten and give the roof bolt a lot of stability.
Fix the batten wherever and fill up with all the awkward tools.
If you pass one end of the loop through itself, it becomes self-tightening (look up Prusik loop used in climbing).
I haven't found anything in the workshop of reasonable size and weight that you can't do by this method, in fact I have one gareage wall, already battened and ply faced covered in tools and other objects.
You can see where everything is and quickly give the tools a spray of WD40 now and again.
Coming from an engineering/workshop background, wall spikes etc were commonly used for tools, generally as part of industrial bin systems.
This was a fairly cheap, customisable way of doing it and I hadn't seen it before. You could use just threaded studding, but the bolt head keeps everything in place and the bolts don't need cutting - I use larger versions for stuff like ladders.
Just as an add-on, if you have a lot of stuff like pipes etc. I hang these off the ceiling with ladder hooks and use lengths of "square" plastic gutter strung accross the hooks to stop them rolling off.
Many tools are the Mother of Invention

PhilS43 (author)AlM472016-08-30

Hello
I thought this was too simple to have to explain in detail, but here it is.
You drill a suitable hole through the 1" dimension of the batten. M6 will need 6.5-mm for clearance.
On the back face of the batten, counter-bore a recess with enough diameter to take a penny/repair washer of 25-mm diameter plus an M6 nut - if you haven't got a drill press for the Forstener or flat bit, then do the recess first to get the centralising right.
Take the roof bolt an load it with one M6 nut and a penny washer for the "show" face of the batten - push it through the hole and put a penny washer and M6 nut on the back so the the bolt thread is flush and not protruding.
Tighten (10-mm A/F) the back nut so that the penny washers clamp the batten and give the roof bolt a lot of stability.
Fix the batten wherever and fill up with all the awkward tools.
If you pass one end of the loop through itself, it becomes self-tightening (look up Prusik loop used in climbing).
I haven't found anything in the workshop of reasonable size and weight that you can't do by this method, in fact I have one gareage wall, already battened and ply faced covered in tools and other objects.
You can see where everything is and quickly give the tools a spray of WD40 now and again.
Coming from an engineering/workshop background, wall spikes etc were commonly used for tools, generally as part of industrial bin systems.
This was a fairly cheap, customisable way of doing it and I hadn't seen it before. You could use just threaded studding, but the bolt head keeps everything in place and the bolts don't need cutting - I use larger versions for stuff like ladders.
Just as an add-on, if you have a lot of stuff like pipes etc. I hang these off the ceiling with ladder hooks and use lengths of "square" plastic gutter strung accross the hooks to stop them rolling off.
Many tools are the Mother of Invention

Yonatan24 (author)AlM472016-08-26

Drill a hole and insert it through the other side (I think)

AlM47 (author)Yonatan242016-08-26

The batten was already "fixed to the wall" so how does one "insert it through the other side?"

Yonatan24 (author)AlM472016-08-26

Okay...

Drill the hole, insert the bolt through the other side, and them fix it to the wall. Done!

impressive ill try the screwdriver hack :)

Thank you!

AlM47 (author)2016-08-25

Can't understand the pliers holder. It looks like a rod bent 90 degrees at one end and that end glued in a hole. There should be a pic without the pliers blocking the holder so we can see the project. If it is as I surmise above then the epoxy may very well fail from the weight of the pliers--There is no mechanical design/engineering in place other than epoxy. If there is something else giving it strength then this should be shown and described.

Thanks,

A

Yonatan24 (author)AlM472016-08-26

Look at picture 2 of step 1. You're underestimating the 2500 PSI strength of Epoxy...

AlM47 (author)Yonatan242016-08-26

From my many decades of experience with epoxy I wouldn't want to wonder how long the joint would hold the weight and the epoxy either let go of the smooth rod and it slip in the hole or the epoxy break out of the particle board or wood. I'll use the idea but bend both ends of the rod at 90 degrees then drill two holes and it will hold the weight by the engineering of its own design and the epoxy will just hold it in the holes so it doesn't get pulled out of the holes.

Yonatan24 (author)AlM472016-08-26

I also built the same thing that's shown in the first picture for three big and heavy locking pliers. The wood pretty much welds itself to the plywood, and it way better.

If you use a metal rod, just roughen it up with a grinding stone. You'd be surprised at how strong this is. If you've worked with Epoxy for decades, I'm sure you know this...

AlM47 (author)Yonatan242016-08-26

Yep, I know this but it is not mentioned in the instructions!

Now I don't understand what this means --> "The wood pretty much welds itself to the plywood" What wood & plywood might that refer to?

Yonatan24 (author)AlM472016-08-27

Wooden dowel to plywood board. What I meant is that the connection is extremely strong...

KatherynM (author)2016-08-26

looking to store my air powered tools (3 sizes gravity paint gun, roof nailer, framing nailer, finish nailer, impact driver, rivet cutter, shears, ratchet and die grinder. Thanks

Yonatan24 (author)KatherynM2016-08-26

Sorry, but I'm not really familiar with air powered tools. I'm not sure what are the problems with them...

Try this for your driver: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/8d/7d/53...

Step #1 for the rivet cutter

I'm not really familiar with a die grinder, so I'm not sure what you need to consider. Sorry...

Hope this helps!

77bacon77 (author)2016-08-25

I can never seem to find an effective way of storing my jigsaw and circular saw(don't have cases).

Yonatan24 (author)77bacon772016-08-26

Replied to your other comment...

Benne (author)2016-08-22

Nice, what is that hammer in the first picture of step 5 used for?

Yonatan24 (author)Benne2016-08-22

Aaah... It's an aluminum hammer meant for kitchen use...

It has a pretty big surface area, and has a really comfortable handle, so it's pretty good for woodworking. We had no use for it, so I adopted it for the workshop... :)

I think those spikes are meant for texturing meat. You can see this one (I think) here:https://www.amazon.com/OXO-Good-Grips-Meat-Tenderi...

jbitz (author)Yonatan242016-08-25

It's for tenderizing meat. Like, if you get a cheap cut of beef, you can beat it with this hammer to make it easier to cook and chew.
You could probably put some nice texture on some wood with it though, for aesthetic purposes.

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Bio: 15 year old, sick with a deadly disease called DIY-itis!
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