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I needed to test a freezer condenser fan of a GE profile fridge this was my solution.

Step 1: Supply

Get 9 volt battery making sure it is in the good range on the battery tester.
Single strand copper wire (I tried multi strand and it wouldn't stay on)

Step 2: Strip and Twist

strip two five to six inch pieces of wire, bend in half, and twist in a loop. Place one over each post of the battery and tighten up against post.

Step 3: Positive, Signal, Ground

The fan needed a positive supply, a signal supply to signal it to run, and a negative to return to, so only twist the wire on the positive side half way.

The fully twisted wire goes to white or groud. The partly twisted wire goes one each to red power and blue signal (sorry put the fan back in and forgot to get a pic).

The fan tested positive ran so there must be some fault in the motor control board. Hopefully this will help someone else who tries to trouble shoot their own fridge.

GE will only help troubleshoot fridges less than a year old, but they are not likely to go bad are they, God Bless em.

Step 4:

<p>super</p>
<p>Must have been a newer fridge. The old workhorses usually run simple AC or universal fan motors that cycle with the compressor.</p><p>Tiny gains in efficiency. Huge loss in repair ability.</p><p>the bio-battery tester (only works in 9 volt batteries).</p><p>Give the terminals a lick. If you get a small zap, then it is in the 8.5+ volt range and good to go. Slight metallic taste(like a mix of copper and iron. Almost a blood taste )in the tounge means between 6 an 8 volt, mostly dead but still useful for some stuff like &quot;emergency led candelabras&quot;. No reaction means under 5 volt (dead flat), and good only for recycling, or dissassembly (9 volt connectors, every electronics box should have a few)</p>
That is really good know. Thanks!

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