Introduction: A Flask From an Old (Faux) Leather Jacket and a Bottle

Recently I posted an instructable on how to make a flask using old jeans. Here I want to present a little bit different design and different initial material. And because I don't want to repeat myself I'll pay more attention into what I'm doing differently here rather then repeating myself, because, apparently, I don't want to repeat myself.

Also check this and this link to see some photos of couple of my similar projects and reed some bad English about what I was thinking about making those.

The inspiration for my flasks takes its roots from this picture, and after recent searching of "leather Bottle" on Pinterest I find out that I wasn't that original in my designs after all. But this is life, so i'm not that surprised.

Step 1:

This faux leather jacket is a donation from my friend. It has some parts where the material started flaking off (the jacket). I also made a couple of braclets from it so I'll show them in other i'ble.

Step 2:

Here I want to show how I used the sleave from the jacket. You can use other parts or if you going to use a sleave too it is doesn't really matters if it has a zipper like mine.

So, let's begin.

Step 3:

Take the sleave and make sure that you can wrap it around the bottle. If it's fine cut the sleave roughly into size.

Step 4:

Undo the back seam if there's any or just cut the piece to unfold the tube.

Step 5:

Remove the inlay. We need only stretchy faux (or real) leather material to work with.

Step 6:

Here I'm wrapping the piece around the bottle while the zipper is aligned with the middle of the bottles face. I'm pulling the edges slightly to overcome the stretchines of the material a bit and making a mark at the place where two sides are meeting at the surface of the bottle.

Step 7:

I'm folding the piece in half with the zipper as a middle and cutting both sides into size adding 1cm or so to the previous mark (so the width of your piece equals the circumference of the bottle plus couple of centimetres).

Step 8:

I'm finding the height of the piece by aligning the top edge with the bottom rim of the cap and making a mark at the middle of the bottom of the bottle. Add aprox 1 cm to it for the final cut.

Step 9:

Cut the bottom trying to stay square to the sides.

Step 10:

Fold the edges to the back (the centimetre that we're added before) and fix it with glue stick (it's my preferable way to do it). Despite what you'll see on the next photos, fold the bottom edge as well.

Step 11:

Fold the piece so that side edges meet at the middle. It is important to be precise here to be able to get an even seem in the result. Now mark and poke some holes along the edge. By folding the piece this way we're making sure that we got the same number of holes by each side which is important for further sewing.

Unfold the piece and then fold it in half aligning the side edges. Use the same techic to make holes along them (Idid'n do it like this but it doesn't matter).

All this folding, marking and hole making makes more sense if you're using thicker leather, but with thin of faux leather like this, if you're confident enough at your stitching skills you can avoid this preparations.

Step 12:

Sew the bottom. Here you can see, why I should fold the botton edge. Also it's hard to see how the seam looks. I'll put some photos of different flasks, where it's nicely visible at the end.

Now it's a sleave.

Step 13:

Push the corners inside and pull the sleave onto the bottle laying the corners nice and flat. With stretchy materials like this and especially with leather it may be very hard to put the already sewed up sleave onto the botle as I showed at my other instructable. It's hard to pull and difficult to distribute the tensions evenly. This is why we're going to sew the sleave when it's already on the bottle.

Step 14:

Now sew the edges together. You may chose some different stitching.

Step 15:

You can finish this part the way I'm showing at my other instructable if you like.

Here I'm squeezing the material at the neck making sure I'm not pulling it from the other side and marking the line at the surface of the bottle. I'm using the saddle stitch to accomplish the seam.

Step 16:

Punch holes in our "neck wings"...

Step 17:

...and insert metal eyelets to finish the flask.

Step 18:

After attaching a strip, you can carry the flask with you in a convenient way.

Step 19:

And this is where the rest of the sleave went.

You can see that when working with soft and stretchy material like this you can wrap it around irregular shape bottles (to some extend). All you need to do is to make an adjustments at the side edges according to the bottle circumferences at different points.

Step 20:

And here's another example with thicker leather where you can see better how seams are done.

So, this is it for this instructable. Thank you for your attention and have a nice... anything.

Comments

author
MishIsMozh made it!(author)2017-04-07

Seems interesting, definitely i'm gonna to try that kind of stitching.

author
3366carlos made it!(author)2017-01-31

wow

author
Waldemar+Sha made it!(author)2017-02-01

It's not that "wow" )

About This Instructable

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Bio: Generaly confused. Secretly inspired.
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