Introduction: ANTI DENGUE FEVER ARDUINO PROJECT

Picture of ANTI DENGUE FEVER ARDUINO PROJECT

Hello everyone!

Today I will be teaching you how to set up a system which will detect movement and lack of movement. The reason why I want to make this system is because I live in Singapore, and during the rainy season (which is currently happening from mid-October to mid-December), there is a great increase in the number of dengue fever cases. The number one reason as to why dengue fever occurs is due to stagnant water in flower pots which are breeding places for these Aedes mosquitoes which carry the disease.

This anti dengue fever system will detect your movement which represents the changing of the water in the pot, and then countdown for 24 hours. After 24 hours, the buzzer will activate and start beeping, alerting you that the water has been stagnant for 24 hours and you need to change the water!

I hope that this system will be able to help us Singaporeans fight dengue fever together!

Things you need for this set up:

1. Arduino board (can be any, in this case I am using Arduino UNO)

2. Vibration sensor

3. Active buzzer

4. Green LED and resistor

5. Red LED and resistor

6. Male-Male and Male-Female jumper wires

7. Breadboard

Step 1: Setting Up Ground and 5V From Arduino to the Breadboard.

Picture of Setting Up Ground and 5V From Arduino to the Breadboard.

As in the picture, use 1 Male-Male jumper wire to connect the GND pin from the Arduino to the negative portion of the breadboard. Use another Male-Male jumper wire to connect the 5V pin from the Arduino to the positive portion of the breadboard. This is to allow the ground and 5V current to flow through the breadboard so that we can connect all our other stuff to it.

Step 2: Connecting the Green LED

Picture of Connecting the Green LED

1. Use a Male-Male wire to connect from pin 13 to any spot on the breadboard (as in the picture)

2. Connect one end of the resistor to the pin below the end of the jumper wire (breadboard is horizontal view) and the other end on any pin to the right (same row)

3. Connect the positive end of the green LED (the longer leg) to the pin below the right end of the resistor and the negative end of the LED into the pin just to the right.

4. Take one Male-Male jumper wire and attach one end to the pin just below the negative leg of the LED and the other end to the negative row (where we previously connected the GND to the negative row)

(the picture might be more comprehensive than these written instructions, so do refer to the picture above!)

Step 3: Connecting the Red LED

Picture of Connecting the Red LED

1. Repeat the same steps as for the green LED, but this time using the Red LED, and connecting it to pin 12 instead of 13.

You will end up with the set up as in the picture above!

Step 4: Connecting the Vibration Sensor.

Picture of Connecting the Vibration Sensor.

1. Using a Male-Female jumper wire, connect the male end to pin 3 on the Arduino, and the female end to the DO pin on the vibration sensor. This acts as the indicator as to where the vibration sensor is on the Arduino board. In this case, it is represented by pin 3.

2. Using another Male-Female jumper wire, connect the male end to the negative row on the Arduino (where the ground is running) and the female end to the GND pin on the vibration sensor.

3. Using another Male-Female jumper wire, connect the male end to the positive row on the Arduino (where the 5V is running) and the female end to the VCC pin on the vibration sensor.

Your set up should now look something like this in the picture above.

Step 5: Connecting the Active Buzzer.

Picture of Connecting the Active Buzzer.

1. Using a Male-Female jumper wire, connect the male end to pin 4 on the Arduino, and the female end to the I/O pin on the active buzzer. This acts as the indicator as to where the active buzzer is on the Arduino board. In this case, it is represented by pin 4.

2. Using another Male-Female jumper wire, connect the male end to the negative row on the Arduino (where the ground is running) and the female end to the GND pin on the active buzzer.

3. Using another Male-Female jumper wire, connect the male end to the positive row on the Arduino (where the 5V is running) and the female end to the VCC pin on the active buzzer.

YAY! You are done with the physical set up!

Step 6: Putting in the Code…

Copy and paste this code into the Arduino app on your computer, and upload it onto the Arduino board.

int vibr=3;

int green=13;

int red=12;

void setup() {

pinMode(vibr,INPUT);

pinMode(green,OUTPUT);

pinMode(red,OUTPUT);

}

void loop() {

int val;

val=digitalRead(vibr);

if(val==1)

{

digitalWrite(green,HIGH);

delay(0);

digitalWrite(red,HIGH);

delay(86400000); // both green and red for 24 hours rep the "danger timing". you can try it with 10 secs first to try out if it works.

int buzzer=4;

pinMode(buzzer,OUTPUT);

delay(0);

}

else

digitalWrite(red,HIGH);

digitalWrite(green,LOW);

}

(code ends here)

CONCLUSION

Congratulations! You have made your very own stagnant water detector which will alert you after the water has been stagnant for 24 hours!

This is how your final set up will look like…

Step 7:

Picture of

Thank you for going through this project! :)

Attached below is a video of the project working! :) in my test run i used a test timing of 30 seconds for the countdown. do turn on the captions so that you understand what happened at the beginning! :)

One improvement that I will make in the future if I have the time would be to make this system wireless, so that we can attach the vibration sensor to the flower pot wirelessly, This would be more practical as there will not be all these wires hanging loose around, since it is dangerous to have these wires hang around by the water…

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Comments

hemaraj (author)2017-11-21

simple and different

Swansong (author)2017-11-15

That's an interesting idea :)

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