Step 2:

I soldered one wire to the red wire at the battery compartment because there was enough room and the other on the PCB card where the black wire from the battery compartment attached. Once you have that done you just have to connect the other end to your adapter. This is where I used my "M" connector. It is important to match the polarities coming from the adapter to the proper wire connecting to your battery compartment. The controller's PCB were clearly marked which wire was the "+" and which one was the "-". If you get it backwards you will most likely damage the controller.  After you've decided on how to connect the adapter just close up the controller and plug it in. You should be good to go!


Eventually I would like to figure out how I could have the batteries installed and just plug it in to charge the helicopter. Perhaps a small power select switch would do the trick?

<p>A [mono] headphone jack with an internal switch would work for allowing you to run on batteries or an AC adapter. You wouldn't need a switch that you switch yourself, it would cut the power from the batteries as soon as it's plugged in.</p>
I have a similar rc copter. I wondered if you could plug a DC adaptor directly into the helicopter? Sure, it doesn't give you the indicator lights, but wouldn't still charge the copter just fine?
&quot;...how I could have the batteries installed and just plug it in to charge ...&quot;<br> <br> Using a switch would depend on your <em>remembering</em> to use it. If you were to substitute a relay for a switch, and use the power from the a/c adapter to energize the coil, you wouldn't need to worry about fire or other exciting things happening to the batteries or circuitry.<br> <br> I just got a pocket copter and had the same thought you did, however my charger/base appears to be multi-tap, tapping somewhere in between the 9 volts. I haven't examined in depth.
<p>I made two videos to show that you don't need a switch, just a regular DC Power Plug M connector (that you can get at RadioShack or eBay). It has a third switching leg so batteries will take over if you remove the DC power supply plug.</p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="281" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/b3irj6UCZSg" width="500"></iframe></p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="281" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/87kQ4yjd5LA" width="500"></iframe></p>
Hello <br>I've read your post. I have same remote with my helicopter. <br> <br>I have 3-12 V DC Adapter. When I use it instead of batteries and want to charge the heli green light is blinking like if there were discharged batteries in remote. <br> <br>Please, give me an advice what to do!
what type of rc copter is that
I've done this before myself. <br>I've learned though that the adjustable/fixed voltage wall warts don't always output the exact voltage as described on the device. Heres a little info:<br><br>http://wolfstone.halloweenhost.com/Power/powwal_WallWarts.html#WallWartsPutOutWrongVoltage

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Bio: I'm an Electrician by trade and just like to fiddle with stuff in general.
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