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How to transform your dog's horrible breath.

Here, I will explain the purpose, hypothesis, research, procedures, results, and conclusion.

Of course, I will also have the materials and variables shown as well.

NOTE: This experiment has been tested on only dogs, specifically a Havanese two-year-old.  Please notify your pet's vet about allergies to any items used and/or if your pet is not a two year-old Havanese and/or if any unusual behavior, eating habits, etc. occurs during or after this experiment.

Variables:
INDEPENDENT:
          Extra Ingredient Added (Mint and Peanut Butter)
DEPENDENT:
          Breath Rating (1-10, 10 Being the Worst)
CONTROL:
          No Extra Ingredient
CONSTANTS:
          Dog
          Dog’s Diet (Amount, Brand, and Flavor)
          Amount of Treats
          Number of Days Tested for Each Type of Treat
          Person Rating breath
          Amount of Water in Diet
          Amount of Exercise
          Amount of Ingredient Added

Materials:
- Measuring cups
- Dog (2 year old Havanese)
- Measuring spoon
- 2½ cups of flour x 3
- 1 tsp. of salt x 3
- 1 egg x 3
- 1 tsp. of Bouillon granules x 3
- ½ cup of hot water x 3
- ⅓ cup of mint
- ⅓ cup of peanut butter
- Oven
- Blender
- Mixer
- Bowl
- Spoon
- Rolling pin
- Sanitizing wipes
- Cookie cutter
- Pan
- Baking sheet
- 28 cups of generic kibble
- Ziplock bags

Purpose:
The purpose of this experiment is to improve dog breath.

Hypothesis:
If  a dog is given treats containing mint, then the dog’s breath would improve more in comparison to peanut butter, because mint contains several aromatic compounds that cause a strong particular flavor and scent and it contains menthol which stimulates the production of saliva, as dry mouth is a common cause for bad breath, and saliva masks and controls odor causing bacteria.

Research Main Points/ Abstract of Research Paper:
It has been clear to dog owners since the beginning of time that their pet’s breath doesn’t smell very good.  Well, the idea devised was to put an end to this known fact.  To do so, a recipe for a treat was formed, as well as a question: should mint or peanut butter be used?  Also, a hypothesis was conceived: if a dog is given treats assembled with mint, then the dog’s breath would improve more in comparison to peanut butter, because mint causes a strong fresh scent, and peanut butter only dries your mouth so that the saliva cannot rinse and cleanse your mouth normally.  This knowledge was gained from several sources, and it was also discovered that gum disease and diabetes can be origins for this bad breath, and that the diet being revised can help cure the fetidity from the canine’s muzzle.  Following all procedures precisely, the tester will use normal, peanut butter, and mint treats to identify the best treat for improving bad breath in their dog(s).  All results will be recorded.  The results of the previous set of trials ended with the conclusion that mint treats significantly enhance the malodor of the participating puppy’s breath.

The procedures, results, and conclusion will be on their own step.



Step 1: Procedures

1)   Place 2½ cups of flour, 1 tsp. of salt, 1 egg, 1 tsp. of Bouillon granules, and ½ cup of hot water in the bowl and lightly stir.
2)   Spoon out ingredients into the mixer.
3)   Set the mixer at the 4th setting.
4)   Sanitize counter and then sprinkle some flour on it (to avoid dough sticking to the counter).
5)   Preheat oven to 177 degrees celsius.
6)   Spoon out dough onto counter and with rolling pin flatten until the dough is about one to one-and-a-half centimeters thick.
7)   Take the cutter and cut at least eight treats, but you should be able to cut twenty treats.
8)   Place the treats on the pan spaced about three centimeters apart and once the oven is done preheating place it in the oven for fifteen minutes.
9)   Once the treats are done take them out, make sure to use a mitten, and let them cool for ten minutes.
10) Place these in a ziplock bag until the next day.
11) The next morning feed the dog his one cup of kibble and give him 2 ½ cups of water.
12) After about 45 minutes give the dog one of the treat.
13) Once the dog is done eating the treat smell his breath and rate it on a scale of one to ten; ten being the worst.
14) Take him on a walk somewhere between after feeding him in the morning and before feeding him in the evening.
15) Repeat steps eleven to thirteen later that evening.
16) Repeat steps eleven through fifteen for the next three days.
17) On the fifth day repeat steps eleven and thirteen and eleven again that afternoon.
18) On the fifth day repeat step one and two.
19) Add ⅓ cup of peanut butter into the mixer as well.
20) Repeat steps three through ten.
21) Repeat steps eleven through fifteen for the next four days, but this time feed the dog the treats containing peanut butter.
22) On the fifth day repeat steps eleven and thirteen and eleven again that afternoon.
23) On the fifth day take ⅓ cup of mint and a little bit of water and mix them in a blender and pour ⅓ of this into a bowl
24) Repeat step one and ten.
25) Repeat steps eleven through fifteen for the next four days, but this time feed the dog the treats containing peanut mint.

Please READ through the steps before you DO them!!!

After completion, continue onto the next step to compare results.

Step 2: Results and Conclusion

RESULTS:
TREAT 1: NO ADDED INGREDIENT
AVERAGE: 7.25
Day 1:
    morning: 7
    evening: 8
Day 2:
    morning: 7
    evening: 6
Day 3:
    morning: 8
    evening: 8
Day 4:
    morning: 7
    evening: 7
TREAT 2: PEANUT BUTTER
AVERAGE: 6.5
Day 1:
    morning: 6
    evening: 5
Day 2:
    morning: 5
    evening: 6
Day 3:
    morning: 8
    evening: 7
Day 4:
    morning: 8
    evening: 7
TREAT 3: MINT
AVERAGE: 3.875
Day 1:
    morning: 5
    evening: 5
Day 2:
    morning: 3
    evening: 3
Day 3:
    morning: 4
    evening: 3
Day 4:
    morning: 4
    evening: 4


Conclusion:
The hypothesis and conclusion were proved correct, and the mint flavored treat helps dog breath the most!

<p>I got around to making them, for my friend's dogs. Both dogs (black lab and the one pictured) liked them very much and their breath does seem to have improved. The lab had the worst breath. She would pant in your face and you would almost start coughing. After her eating the treats a few times, I don't notice it so much. </p><p>One thing though, I'm not 100% sure about the 15 minutes at 177 degrees baking instructions. Mine came out pretty soft and doughy after 15 minutes. I ended up cooking them for more like 30 minutes. That and not all ovens allow such precise control of temperature. </p><p>Forgot to take a picture of the actual treats, but here'a a pic of one of the doggies looking very satisfied after eating them. I'll see if I can get a pic of them the next time I visit my friend, if there are any left.</p>
<p>This is really interesting! For a while we were giving our dog a little bit of mint in his water, and it worked pretty well. I'll have to see if I can get some mint into his treats. :D</p>

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