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I needed a re-saw fence for an upcoming project, so I made one from half inch plywood. It's basically four pieces, all glued and brad nailed. A very simple project. Continuing reading to see how I did it.

Step 1: Tools and Video

Step 2: Break Down the Plywood

At the table saw, or you could use a circular saw, cut the pieces needed for your particular fence. In my case, I needed two pieces 13.75" long by 3" wide and one piece 13.75" long by 2.75" wide for the base, which will fit over the factory fence. The fourth piece is the front tall portion of the fence and it measures 13.75" long by 6" wide. *Note: when measuring for the two side pieces (3" pieces) I didn't measure all the way down to the table. I left about an 1/8" gap between the table and the bottom of the base. This allows the base to move freely without any problems. The front fence portion will be touching the table.

Step 3: Assemble the Base

First thing is to apply glue to the edges of the middle piece, the one that measures 2.75" wide. The 3" pieces will attach to the outside edges of the 2.75" pieces creating a U shape. Secure the base with brad nails making sure not to blow out the side. PRO TIP: when using brad nails, turn your nail gun ninety degrees to the piece your nailing into to prevent blow out (I don't show this in the pictures). I could've very easily experienced blow out, but I didn't.

Step 4: Test the Fit and Attach the Front Fence

After assembling the base, make sure the new base fits over your existing fence. In my case, I had to apply a small amount of paste wax to the inside to lessen the friction. Once you get the base to fit properly, rest the main front portion of the fence against the base making sure everything is lined up correctly and make a mark along the back side of the front fence where it meets the base. This will tell you where to glue the base to the front fence. Next, apply glue to the base side you referenced when marking the front fence and spread evenly. Attach the base to the back of the fence, with glue only at this point, making sure to reference the line you marked earlier. *Note: make sure your base is glued to the line you marked to ensure the bottom edge of the front fence will sit flat on the table. Next, use clamps to hold everything in place while the glue dries. A safe bet is to wait a couple of hours before removing the clamps in this situation. If this were a stress joint then we would want to wait 24 hours before removing the clamps.

Step 5: Mark, Cut and Install the Support Pieces

In this step, I used a square scrap piece of plywood to create the support pieces for the back of the fence. Make a mark from corner to corner using a straight edge and cut on that line at the bandsaw. After you have two triangular pieces, glue and brad nail them to the back of the fence. Shoot a couple of brad nails in each support from the back and bottom as well. Take the time to measure where they are before shooting brad nails from the opposite side. The re-saw fence is now complete.

Watch the video here: http://www.stoneandsons.net/buildvideos

and see our tools here: http://www.stoneandsons.net/tools

If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us on our website: http://www.stoneandsons.net

I like this ible not only because you describe your work well, but also I like the mentioning of the machines you are using. That gives me valuable information, as I am just setting up my workshop, while being bit clueless about what to buy.
<p>I understand what you 've made. I only wonder why you didn't just make the large standing up part, part of the wooden fence that you slide over the aluminum fence? Then it would use less wood and not change anything with any cut while re-sawing material. And did you change the blade for re-sawing, and if so what are you using. </p>
<p>I could have done that, but the way I made it offers more glue surface for a more sturdy fence. Also, this way I only have four brad nail holes in the fence. Otherwise, I would have more fasteners in the front. The blade I'm using is just the stock blade for testing, <a>Highland Woodworking</a> has the Wood Slicer resaw blade available. Thanks for reading.</p>

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