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here are two very easy, very worthwhile things you can do to improve your indoor gardening and life in general. Enjoy.

Step 1: Idea #1 - Make Your Indoor Garden Brighter... Hooray for Photosynthesis

add some mylar to your walls and black to your floor. more light and more radiant heat means more plant growth!

Step 2: Give Your Plants, AND YOU, Better Water!

i'm not going to belabor the point of structured water. lots of info is out there. i think its pretty evident that the science behind subtle energies is becoming more and more accepted (quantum physics dictates we're all exchanging photons, electrons and a whole host of other particles and wavelengths all the time). AND its pretty hard to argue with some of the studies done on structured water, i think. some call me crazy, to them i say, "MY PLANTS GROW LIKE CRAZY!!!" I had an aloe vera flower in montana in the winter, for heaven's sake. my neighbors make fun of me because plants are going crazy in my back yard and i have to prune them constantly. i don't add fertilizer, i don't rototill, but i do structure my water with about 30 minutes of vortexing per bottle from my tap (i do also use a brita tap filter because the water in livingston, montana is pretty mineral laden).

look at all the research done with structured water, try it out with some good music or tones going (youtube has lots of them) and enjoy good water. if nothing else, your hand-eye coordination will improve from the sensitivity developed from this exercise in mindfulness.

AGO RECOLO VITAE ("live to cultivate life")! :)

<p>Nice, simple and inexpensive. Now, how do you keep plants that have thrived outside from dying when you bring them inside. I currently have radiators in the house I rent. Just about all of my collection of expensive plants have died. I put two in the basement, hopefuly they will survive</p>
<p>Much like exercise for humans, you need to achieve specificity; gymnasts don't train like endurance runners because it would defeat the function they're trying to get out of their form. You need to try and mimic the outside plants' specific requirements inside as closely as you can. I live in a very windy area (60-70mph wind storms are common occurrences here), so I need to make sure if i bring a lilac from outside in, I don't give it too much water because it's used to a very arid situation and water just doesn't evaporate as quickly inside the house. Another one is soil type; if your plants were straight in the ground outside and you pot them you need to scale down that environment to the size of the pot with plenty of good drainage, usually. Proper light, the right amount of water, and you still will probably see some die-back at first and you might even have to concede to trimming the roots and letting the plant become smaller. It would really depend on re-creating (as closely as you can) what the outside conditions were that made the plant thrive. Hope that helps :)</p>

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