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 i managed to get together various parts to create a multi-use bicycle trailer.

the main frame is an old car aluminium roof-rack, fitting the wheels was hard but i utilised the tube clamps that came with it (sorry i don't know the correct name of them).
the main axle was too weak so i changed it to an old steel tent pole,
and the cross piece at the front is also a section of steel tent pole.

the metal cage is a fire guard, it's held together with hose clips these are fully adjustable and reuseable.

Step 1: The Basic Frame

Here the Roofrack frame is clearly visible as a light grey surrounding the whole trailer. good thing is the roofrack already has loads of easily adjustable bolts so no welding needed.

the central "T" shape is steel i tried the trailer without the "T" but the wheels were dangerously loose whaen any load was applied to the frame. not having the tools to drill through steel i had to improvise with hoseclips which are surprisingly easy to use and very strong.

the metal cage (brown colour) used to be a fire guard, i had to bend the pieces with a Vice and hammer but again quite easy to do.

from this angle its quite easy to note that both wheels are leaning out, i can't seem to do anything about this but it the wheels straighten when weight is put on the trailer.

the hitch, AAAAGH! horrible! its the handle from the top of a scooter forced onto one of the steel poles i've had massive problems securing it it basicaly hooks onto a "U" section i attatched to the bike it worked ok but rattled alot and actually fell off twice whilst in use(which i've since changed to a much safer system!)



Step 2: The Underside View

Here you can clearly see how it's all joined together, the steel crosspice is clearly visible and adds massive lateral stability to the hitch.

closest to the front i've slinted a piece of flat aluminium strip(used to be a rucksack frame) to the horizontal aluminium pole

Step 3: The Bad Hitch (now Improved)

A close up of the dodgy hitch, it had good potential but lots of flaws, especially going around tight corners it sort of jack knifed.

it worked for a few weeks and i still think it would be a usefull idea for someone if they can make it more secure.

the main downfall for me is i could never secure it to the steel tent pole even with clamps it twisted and fell off, a simple bolt would have been fine.(but i don't have the tools)

Step 4: After the Paint Job

I decided on "green".

I've found after some use that "Bungees"(elastic travel straps)are the best way to attach stuff quickly, like gardening tools and bags, losse stuff i carry in a larger box then strapped down.
on this picture you can see the "drop down"
rear section i made (held with Bungees) but i found i never used it and it rattled alot even when tightly strapped

since this picture i have added front, rear, and side reflectors.

another idea i'm toying with is using a barrel to hold gear, and also making flat sides to the frame so i can advertise my business.

Hope you like my first Indestructable!
a few months ago i had my first "HITCH FAILURE". I had been waiting for a long time for this to happen so i knew what the hitch could cope with. Well I'm still using the same Hitch after a year and my trailer will take loads in excess of what i can lift. including 1 Meter square loads of soil. the Hitch broke after i did a very sharp(more than 90 degrees) turn on my bike and the trailer corner got caught on a wooden post, and pulled/twisted the hitch off the garden hose (it wasn't too dramatic). the flaw was not the coupling or the hose it was the pressure put on the joint when I caught the trailer. basically what I'm saying is the Garden hose,brass joiner system is pretty sound! for huge amounts of weight pulled.
Good job!

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