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The Big Foot Race

It all began with a picture. I saw a picture of Big Foot Race on pinterest (of course) and was instantly intrigued, but when I searched for further information on how to make it, and how much it cost, I found almost nothing. It appeared the game was played at a few company picnics and a couple of places sold them, but the game was otherwise unknown. So I decided to make my own.

With a bit of thought, a few evenings of work and a handful of materials, three sets of big feet were soon ready for testing.

When used at my graduation party, everyone said it was one of their favourite races and one person said it was like an "extreme three legged race". Three legged racing is twice fun as normal racing, but Big Foot racing is three times the fun.

So enjoy the making and enjoy the racing.

Step 1: List of Tools and Materials

I used basic tools and materials that I already had on hand. If you don't have old hose you could use rags, PVC pipe or even pool noodles (as long as they are not to thick to hold). For wood I used an 3/8" x 4' x 8' sheet of OSB and then cut it into six equal pieces measuring 8" by 8' (enough to make three pairs). Most big feet measure 1' wide but I found that 8" was perfectly adequate. For the handles I used nylon strap but any kind of rope would work as long as it is strong enough to not break in the race and small enough to go through the hose pieces.

List of tools

Drill and drill bit (1/4 inch or slightly bigger than the size of rope)

Tape Measure

Pencil

Sander (I used an orbital)

Round file

Pipe Cutter

Scissors

Paint brush, paint can opener, and paint stirrer

Materials for one pair of big feet

36' rope or nylon strap

Two boards 3/8" x 8" x 8'

24" of old hose

Paint

I estimate the cost in materials for three pairs to be about $18. More if you by higher cost materials.

Step 2: Make Your Marks

Take one of the boards and make cross marks every 24" along the length and 1 1/2" from the sides. A total of six hole marks per board.

I also made one pair with four sets of holes for fun, with the distance between the holes 19" instead of 24". There was a little extra space on one end but it caused no problems.

Step 3: Drill and Sand the Holes

Drill a hole through all of the cross marks. Then use the file to smooth out the rough edges of the holes.

Step 4: Time to Sand

Sand all sides of the board and smooth the corners (Can't have those bare foot rebels getting splinters). I used an orbital sander but almost any kind of sander would work.

Step 5: Paint, Paint, Paint

Next paint the boards. I used spray paint and normal paint, both appeared to work fine. First paint one side, one end and one edge. Let it dry. Then paint the other side and edges and let dry.

Step 6: Cut the Strap and Hose

Cut the strap into six 6' pieces. The length could be changed but I found it worked great for a wide range of heights at six feet. Next cut the hose into six 4" pieces. Again the length is just what I found worked best. I measured by the width of my hand and it turned out to be about four inches but feel free to experiment on your own.

Step 7: Add the Handle

Next, thread one end of the strap through one of the holes and tie a simple knot on the bottom side of the board.

Step 8: Finished Handle

Thread a piece of hose onto the untied end of strap. Then thread the the strap through the hole opposite of the first knot and tie another simple knot on the bottom side of the board. Do the same with the remaining five sets of holes.

Step 9: One Set of Big Feet

Tada!! One set of Big feet.

One of the big feet did break but the racers were still able to race on it, however it might be preferable to use a stronger wood for the big feet then 3/8" thick OSB. I had thought that the boards might be heavy but in fact they were easily handled, so thicker wood would not be an issue.

Everyone had loads of fun with these, myself included, so good luck with your building and don't hesitate to have a Big Foot Race at your next outdoor party!

<p>We used to live in West Virginia, and the youth group in our church made a couple of pairs of these out of 2&quot; X 4&quot; X 8' lumber, and used them for races at the church picnic. We called them West Virginia Mud Skis! They are tons of fun! Paint them in wild colors, and paint footprints on the boards where your feet are supposed to go.</p>
<p>That's great! So glad to hear about another version. I referred to the race as a ski race before I knew the more common name. </p>

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Bio: Love to learn new things. Love to make new things.
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