Introduction: Board and Batten Shou Sugi Ban Door

Picture of Board and Batten Shou Sugi Ban Door

A board and batten door has a rustic solid look and by using Japanese shou sugi ban wood burning to darken the wood, you make the door more attractive and resistant to deterioration.

Step 1: The Door

Picture of The Door

The door was pretty simple. I measured the opening, cut 2x4s and 2x6s to the height and ripped one board to get the perfect width.

Then 4" above the top and bottom I screwed in a batten an inch narrower than the door. I made sure to get at least two screws in every board.

I divided the remaining distance between the top and bottom batten by 3 so I would have even spacing of the sections.

Step 2: Equipment

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To do the shou sugi ban, I used a propane weed burner, a wire brush, a rag, water, a broom, and a fire extinguisher for safety.

Step 3: Technique

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I placed the door on a fireproof surface.

Starting from one side, I charred the door.

Then I flipped the door and charred the other side. Knot holes will take more time. Angles such as where the board and battens meet will take a little bit more torch.

One of the nice things is you don't have to worry about any markings on the boards or stickers. They will burn off.

Step 4: Completing the Burn

Picture of Completing the Burn

As you burn the door, look for the alligator crackle effect.

Make sure there is no natural wood color showing and the whole door, including knot holes, ends, and sides is charred.

Step 5: Scrapping Off the Burnt Parts

Picture of Scrapping Off the Burnt Parts

After everything is charred, use a wire brush to scrape off all of the char, leaving the dark wood behind.

Make sure there is none of the alligator skin left and the wood has an even appearance.

Step 6: Clean Up

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Start with a broom Sweep off all the charcoal dust.

Using a dry rag, mop off more charcoal dust

Finish by running water on the door and washing it off with another rag.

Step 7: Sealing

Picture of Sealing

From what I've ready, traditionally the door were sealed with tung oil.

I used a matte polyurethane to seal the door after I was finished.

After the door was dry, I hung it in the opening.

Comments

seamster (author)2017-04-10

This looks good!

I keep seeing people using this technique, but I've never tried it myself. Going to have to give it a shot though, as I quite like the look. Thanks for sharing the details! :)

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