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--INTRODUCTION--

Goals

After building a few different cornhole board sets using various different designs, and even trying a store bought set, I realized that none of the sets were really satisfying my cornholing needs.  Therefore, the goal of this set was to improve on all the previous sets and create a pair of boards that were much lighter and more aesthetically pleasing than the others while still maintaining their bounce-less quality and durability. The original plans for my set came from the Advanced Bouncless Folding-Leg Box Frame Style directions found on www.cornholegameplayers.com. However, even these plans, which I've tried word for word in the past, ended up producing boards that were extremely heavy and ugly, therefore I've altered them and thus present you this modified guide.

Background
The game of Cornhole is a backyard game or tailgating game that is very similar in nature to Horseshoes. While much of the history of the game is under dispute as to its original origins, no one will deny the fact that the game first gained popularity in the midwest and has no spread to just about all states nationwide and all college campuses. The rules of the game are extremely simply, a player gets one point for landing a bag on the board, and three points for landing it in the hole. Game points are awarded as the difference of the points for the round and the game is over after a team reaches 21 game points. More in depth rules of the game can be found here.

Materials
Lumber
(4) 8' length 3/4" x 2 1/2" Birch*
(2) 2' x 4' sheets of 3/4" Birch plywood**

Hardware
(4) 4" long 3/8" Carriage Bolts
(8) 3/8" Washers
(4) 3/8" Wing Nuts
(56) 2" Deck Screws, or Finishing Nails***

Tools
-Power Drill
-Drill Bits (Philips, pilot, 3/8")
-Jig Saw
-Miter Saw
-Sander or Sand Paper
-Measuring Tape
-Wood Glue
-Circle Compass

Notes:
*I chose to use smaller amounts of wood on the frame for weight reasons, while hopefully still maintaining the board's bounce free quality.
**I also used Birch wood since it has a nice grain and I knew I wanted to stain the finished product, feel free to use whatever kind of 3/4" thick wood suites your individual project needs. 
***While many people use deck screws, I chose to use finishing nails and an air-powered nail gun for aesthetics.

Steps
Step 1 - Preparing the lumber
Step 2 - Constructing the boards
Step 3 - Cutting the holes
Step 4 - Constructing the legs
Step 5 - Attaching the legs
Step 6 - Adding the cross beam



Step 1: Preparing the Lumber

--Step 1: Preparing the Lumber--

First we will begin by laying out and cutting all the lumber, when all this is said and done, you will be left with (4) long frame sides, (4) short frame sides, (4) legs, and (2) cross beams.

For the first two beams, we will cut out two long sides and all four short sies. Begin by marking cross lines on the wood at 48" and 72" from the end. Do this for both beams and then cut on the lines. This will give us two 48" long sides and all four 24" short sides.

For the second two beams, make marks at 12", 24", 72", and 94.5" from one end. After marking these on both beams, cut on the marks. The two 12" pieces will serve as the legs, the 48" pieces will be the second set of long sides, and the 22.5" pieces will serve as the cross beams.

Now that all the pieces are cut out, we will prepare the corners so they create flush, "picture frame" like corners. On both ends of all the short sides (24" pieces) and long sides (48" pieces) cut a 45 degree angle to the inside from the outside corner (see the diagram).
Looking for plans and came across this. Nice logo!<br>ZAX, LB766
<p>Under the last paragraph under Step 1 Preparing the Lumber, he said, &quot;On both ends of all the short sides (24&quot;pieces) and long sides(48&quot; pieces) cut a 45 degree angle to the inside from the outside corner (see the diagram). Hence, &quot;picture frame&quot; like corners, aka mitered joints. The result is a perfect 24&quot;X48&quot; frame.</p>
<p>If you have a 24&quot; and a 48&quot; piece, you have a board 48&quot; + 2 times the width of the wood. Therefore, the length would be longer than the 48&quot; regulation. </p>
<p>Great job, the instruction set is excellent and the finished product is awesome. We will be making a set soon.</p>
Love your build and your train of thought, but if you're trying to save weight, I believe &quot;regulation&quot; cornhole calls for a 1/2&quot; Plywood deck rather than 3/4&quot; - with the bracing you used or possibly a cross-brace across the lower part of the deck, I suspect it would be similarly bounce-free.
I like your symbol sir! <br>ZAX, <br>IO840
Great Work! I'm just curious as to how you painted the edges and applied the glossy coat. Any advice on this?
Cross &amp; Crescent: LXA, eh? I was a chopper at U. of Illinois. x1624. Thanks for posting instructions.
I sure wish I had your instructions when we were doing the bean bag toss for carnival. Very nice work.

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