Traditionally a Bug Out Bag is for the SHTF so that you can grab it, jump into your 4x4, and drive to your cabin in the woods. While the cities are dark and the streets are violent, you are happily living out the rest of your life eating deer and  drinking your 25 lbs of coco. Living in Southern Oregon, I expect this is the plan of every one of my neighbors. With 20,820 people out in the woods having a grand old time shooting deer and each other, the deer will last 3 days and the people 6.

However this article is a bit more practical. There are 3 types of emergencies; natural, technological, and human-caused.  This is how I plan to be prepared for each situation. I’ll give back ground information on what I have stored in the house first, because I plan on staying home unless it is too dangerous. The more stuff  I can keep in the house, the less I need in my bag. My bag has what I won’t use unless I’m in an emergency, or leaving. If you were to go and copy my bag without knowing how to use it, it won’t do you much good, For example the bag has a camp stove and a days’ worth of fuel, but it should easily last me week.

Natural emergencies include blizzards, earthquakes, tornados, hurricanes, floods and tsunamis.
Technological emergencies includes power outages, fires and chemical attacks.
Human-Caused is just civil disorder or national emergencies aka war or terrorism.

Note: Orange text is hyperlinked for more information.

Step 1: Choose Your Emergency

Step 1 is to decide what to be prepared for. In my case I choose power outage, snow storms, earthquakes, and civil disorder. For each cause I’d expect different needs and results. I wouldn’t necessarily have extra blankets stored for an earth quake, or munitions for a snow storm. I'll list below what I’d expect for a worse case scenario in each emergency.

Power outage: No appliances, light, or heat (my house is all electric). If a power outage were to last 3 days I’d expect to need a way to cook, and some light. I have a BBQ with a full bottle of propane. Nearby is a lantern and flash light. The BBQ is easy because I already have it.The full propane tank next to it has saved dinner, more than once. I’m not real worried of a power outage, it would mostly be like camping at home. Just remember to eat foods that will expire first, open the freezer and fridge as little as possible, and don’t waste batteries. The water should still be running.

Snow Storm: Power outage in the cold and the inability to drive, is an issue. To avoid  frozen pipes, leave the tap water running slowly. (I use electric heaters so my pipes do not freeze)  In a storm I will need heat and light. Basically, follow the power outage rules, but the food can go outside to stay cold. For heat I have a Colman Catalytic Heather that runs on Colman fuel. Keep  extra fuel on hand.

This would be a good place to insert my plans for fuel. Besides the BBQ (which is listed because it’s easy) I keep everything on Coleman Fuel, AKA white gas. Back in the sixties, cars ran on leaded gas and Coleman fuel was refined unleaded gas. Now days, the unleaded gas for cars is basically Coleman fuel.  After my gallon of overpriced Coleman fuel is depleted, I will  use unleaded gasoline. I have tested it in the catalytic heater and a Coleman Peak 1 back pack stove, with no problems. In almost any emergency, gasoline will be the most abundant fuel available (well for 6 months until it expires).

Make certain you have the correct batteries for your equipment and that they work. My flash lights and radios all run on AAA or D batteries, and I have extras ( D’s are heavy to carry).

Now we're getting into long term planning. Do I think that an earthquake or civil disorder will likely occur in the next 5 years? Probably not, but possibly, In the next 50 years. Unlike in snow storms, the hooligans will be out in the streets causing all sorts of mischief.

Earthquakes:  The last memorable earthquake in Oregon was in 1993. I live in the ring of fire and earthquake zone. An earthquake may cause a power outage and water mains and gas lines can break. My dad was a rescue worker in the LA Quakes and I would not like to see the gas lines in the street breaking causing fires on top of the fallen building. It is one of the few scenarios where I’d expect to be leaving the house, or the city to go to a safe zone or shelter. I’d follow the power outage rules; carry extra water, leave the radio on to hear warnings, and bring the" bug out bag". It should be packed with seasonal clothes and ready to head out the door. I would plan on minimal civil disorder in my area but in larger cities there may be more.

Civil Disorder: Now we're getting into the "what if" territory. I’d expect to plan similar to earthquakes, but it is unpredictable. You should have a safe meeting place planned  in advance. It should be quick to get to, maybe a friend’s house. Leaving the house should be last resort. Having a sign posted out front that all trespassers will be shot could make your house the last to be ransacked. The gangs would stay in the city and the country boys would have roads blocked off. Freeways will be jammed with little time to safely get to a secure area. The bag could be your best bet for survival.

In any emergency, arriving to a shelter, safe house or friends with your own supplies, will help and increase your chances of being allowed to stay. No one want to take care of others if they don’t have enough supplies themselves.
<p>I would not want to cook food with gas because of the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benzene" rel="nofollow" style="">benzene</a>... as heating fuel it would be fine. Coleman fuel is gas with the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benzene" rel="nofollow" style="">benzene</a> removed at the refinery.</p>
Congratulations on being a finalist in the be prepare contest!
um a bigger knife fire arm bullets and cell phone/cb or ham radio
ya you are right, I was gona let the ham radio experts take care of radios, and I do not know which guns would be best to recommend.
People have lots of opinions on which gun would be best based on ammo availability, knockdown power, and a bunch of other things. My opinion is the one you have practiced using is best. In a situation where you are forced to use it you better be very familiar with how to use it.
Don't forget, if you have well water, your water will go as soon as you lose power. A hand pump is a plus.
My brothers, in the late 1960's kept freeze dried food in the back of a pickup camper. <br>We discovered that the gourmet mice had discovered every bag of it. <br> <br>Try getting large lard tins to hold the toilet paper and the flour, pancake mix, dried beans, rice etc. <br> <br>Square 5 gallon press top cans are air tight and mouse proof and can in large numbers support a matress. Sleep well and eat well. <br> <br>Try FREUND CANS in Chicago.
Very informative. More ideas for me to put on my list so I can add things to what I have. Thanks.
I've seen a stove that uses almost all types of fuel, my dad almost bought it for his motorcycle trips. White gas, gasoline, propane, almost anything
you should have 2 gallons of water per person per day
A handy addition to your bug-out bag would be a spare phone charger, preferably a hand-cranked one like<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Ambient-Weather-WR-111-Emergency-Flashlight/dp/B0071BTJPI/ref=reg_hu-rd_add_1_dp" rel="nofollow"> this</a> which includes a weather alert radio and flashlight.<br>
Use a leatherman and a better knife not a Swiss army knife <br>Some matches or more lighters would be useful to
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