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Step 27: The bench, step one - joing the top and base

With the top laying on the floor, bottom side up, the next step is to flip the base upside down, and attach it to the top. I followed Asa Christiana's design, in using s-clips. When I stopped by my local Woodcraft, though, they only had two packages of ten, so I didn't use as many as I would have, otherwise. For the top I put four on each side and two on each end. For the shelf I put three on each side and two on each end. If it turns out that I need more, I can always add more.

First, line up the base with the top. Then screw it down using the s-clips.

Mount the vise bases, and tighten them down with nuts, washers, and lock-washers.

Flip it on edge, and sand the edges smooth. If you used epoxy to fill voids, as I did, you might want to start with a belt sander. (Or if you're more comfortable with hand tools, you might use a card scraper.) With a random orbital sander, work through 100, 150, and 200 grit. Then flip it over and do the other edge.

After sanding the second edge, clamp the shelf in place, oiled side down. Then flip the bench upside down again, and attach the shelf to the base using s-clips. (You'll need 3/4" self-tapping panhead screws - the screws you used on the top will be too long.)

With the shelf secure, get a couple of friends to come help, and stand the bench on its feet. I said earlier moving the top by yourself is dangerous. Trying to lift the entire bench is foolhardy. Of course, I already said I'm stubborn, so I did it myself by rigging a simple block-and-tackle using lightweight pulleys I got at the hardware store. (Not the lightest-weight pulleys, those are meant for flag poles and have a design load of something like 40 pounds. These had a design load of 420 pounds.)

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Where do I go to get dimensional lumber planned and sanded as you suggest. Does HD or Lowe's offer this?
<p>HD in my area doesn't sell kiln dried 4x4...i got them at lowes though</p>
<p>check instructions from WoodPrix projects</p>
<p>Great tutorial <a href="http://www.instructables.com/member/jdege/" rel="nofollow">jdege!!</a></p>
<p>Great instructable </p>
<p>Hi, I've added your project to the <em style="">&quot;Make Your Own Workbench!</em><em style="">&quot;</em> Collection</p><p>This is the link If you are interested:</p><p><a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Make-Your-Own-Workbench-For-the-Workshop/">http://www.instructables.com/id/Make-Your-Own-Work...</a></p>
<p>Thank you for the excellent instructable. I had a little extra funds and short on time so I skipped the edging and went with two ikea beech countertops. Vise jaws were old oak stair treads doubled up. Two coats of natural Danish oil. I am pretty happy with it, can't wait to start on some projects.</p><p>Lessons learned: Watch out for knots! Also countertop seems a bit thinner at the front and back not great for using the entire depth. Next time I would go with the 2&quot; prefinished hardwood workbench top they sell at lee valley. Same price, not quite as thick though, and they don't deliver. They also just added a nice bushing/bit set for making your own jig to drill the holes. I will probably move the flip down casters to the outside of the leg and higher up they don't get enough leverage to lift the table easily where they are. Also bolt through the leg don't use the little screws they give you.<br><br>I make a sketchup file for the workbench here: </p><p><a href="https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/model.html?id=ufc9f7839-a28b-47a0-b8a7-51fd47c02377" rel="nofollow">https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/model.html?id=ufc9f7839-a28b-47a0-b8a7-51fd47c02377</a></p>
Looks amazing. I'd like to go for a solid hardwood top too. How did you laminate the two pieces of beech? Glue, screws, both? If you used screws, did you pre-drill larger holes on the bottom slab to allow for movement? Or is this defeated by the glue? Thanks!
<p>I lined up the top and bottom pieces, and drilled the holes using an upcut spiral bit on my router before gluing. It wasn't long enough to go all the way through the second layer so I had to take a second pass to finish up the holes on the bottom. Then I used dowels in the holes to perfectly line up the pieces and used bolts with big washers through the holes to clamp them together while gluing, then routed the edges flush. Make sure if the counters are bowed you want the gap in the middle not the edges. One problem I had is the counters are tapered at the edges and I only took 1/8&quot; off which was not enough so I wound up with a little gap I had to fill with glue before routing the edges. I used yellow glue so it matches pretty good and looks like it's supposed to be there.</p>
<p>Has anyone tried using a vacuum bag and a vacuum pump, like they use in autoclaves, to use air pressure to an advantage in gluing multiple layers into one top? The general idea is to use the pressure of the atmosphere to your advantage. Put a soft blanket on a flat floor (to avoid tearing plastic), then a large sheet of thick plastic, large enough to fold over and encapsulate the whole table top in plastic. Place your first laminate layer down, add adhesive, then the second layer (continuing as many layers as you want.) Position the layers exactly as you want them, close the plastic over it, tape all openings, then use an automotive vacuum pump to draw out all the air inside the bag. The weight/pressure of the atmosphere would then provide 22,464 pounds of clamping pressure on a 72&quot;x24&quot; top, just as strong in the middle, as on the edges. For multiple layers, use an adhesive with longer working time, or take it in multiple steps. It works in aerospace, but is no more complicated than my wife's vacuum food saver. Vast clamping pressure. Automotive stores rent the pumps out. They are engineered to hold zero pressure for extended periods. </p>
<p>Thanks, very helpful. Nice tip with the dowels and bolts. I was worrying about the two slabs contracting/expanding independently, but I guess that by gluing the two slabs any width-ways expansion will happen as a single block of wood. And that can be accommodated by the slight play in the table-top S fasteners.</p>
<p>You could also band the edges like the original plan and avoid the problem entirely but I was being lazy it seemed like a lot of extra work for just a workbench.</p>
<p>Thanks for the instructions.. I made a slightly modified version of this today. Because the nature of the poplar top I used, I plan on Epoxying it for added durability. I haven't added a end vise yet.. maybe someday. I made a <a href="https://goo.gl/photos/ranvcpky8Qo4GiAA9" rel="nofollow">6 minute time lapse</a> from 6 hours of video. Thanks again!</p>
<p>Is Edge Glue Oak&quot; the same as counters made of individual small oak blocks? If so, would beech be as good? It's a bit cheaper.</p>
What you want is a dense hardwood with closed pores. Oak isn't ideal because it's pores are too open. Maple is the usual choice in the U.S., beech is the more common choice in Europe.<br><br>So yes, beech would be fine. Would probably work better than oak. The third choice from Ikea is birch, which is far too soft.
<p>Thankyou. Am I correct in assuming &quot;Edge Glued Oak&quot; is the same as counters made of individual small oak (or beech) blocks glued together?</p>
<p><a href="http://community.woodmagazine.com/t5/General-Woodworking/Edge-grain-vs-face-grain/td-p/272662">http://community.woodmagazine.com/t5/General-Woodw...</a></p>
<p>Which woodworking plans site is best? Anybody have some good<br>recommendations?</p>
This may be a silly question or something no one has thought of but I need to ask...I am left handed and use most of my tools left handed. Would you recommend building it in a &quot;mirror&quot; fashion?
Absolutely. And it's not a silly question. Most left-handed woodworkers set their vises up reversed - tail vise on the left and face vise on the right.
<p>Hi Jdege,</p><p>How does a front vice differs from an end vice : In Mechanism or In Size ?</p><p> Regards,</p><p>Ritesh</p>
<p>The only difference between the two vice mechanisms is the distance between the screws. The end vice has them placed farther apart.</p>
<p>Thanks!</p><p> Gr8 help!</p><p>However, I am finding it tough to get them india..may be I have to wait.</p>
This is professional works ! Thank you Jdege ! Please do one foe me... ^~^
<p>Hi Jdege,</p><p>I don't see anywhere you mentioned the over all length of the bench top. A piece of 1 1/2&quot; x 25&quot; x 8' glued edge oak at Lumber Liquidators costs $192 including tax. Two piece is almost $400! Would that be better if I use two IKEA 1 1/4&quot; x 25&quot; x 74&quot; solid Beech ($99 each plus tax) on top of a layer of 3/4&quot; Birch plywood. That would be 3 1/4&quot; over all. </p>
<p>I was at IKEA in Philadelphia today. There is no 1 1/2&quot; glued edge beech counter top. They only have either 1 1/8&quot; solid wood or 1 1/2&quot; beech over particleboard.</p>
Yep. They discontinued it a year or so ago.<br><br>Try Lumber Liquidators. They sell butcher block countertop, and might have a store close enough that you could avoid shipping.
<p>This makes me want to buy a house just so I can build a workbench!!! </p>
<p>Hey Jdege!</p><p>Greetings from India!</p><p>Thanks for your detailed work description, they are very helpful. Can you please help me with the dimensions of the vices(jaw width and jaw openings) or post their model numbers!</p><p>P.S : I am brand new to woodworking, but surly build this workbench</p><p>Regards,</p><p>Ritesh</p>
I used Rockler's quick release front vise and end vise. There are links in the I'ble.<br><br>I'd suggest that you have the vices in hand before you start, rather than trying to fit by measurements.
<p>Almost complete with mine, will post a photo when I've had a chance to apply some finish to it. I have to say that I've never worked with MDF before, and I hope to never again for a similar application. In retrospect, it would have been work the money to just buy hardwood to avoid the stress.</p><p>I'll share the vise that I'm using since I'm not sure anyone else has pointed it out (http://www.amazon.com/Woodstock-D4026-Cabinet-Makers-Vise/dp/B005W16LVE/ref=sr_1_5?s=hi&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1426440611&amp;sr=1-5&amp;keywords=woodworking+vise+for+workbench) for ~70 buck you get an awesome vise, well-machines, that you just have to add lag bolts/ #12 screws, and a dowel to and it's functional. I'm using it for the front vise, but I think it would be viable on the end too with a large wooden jaw.;</p>
The plans I was working from used MDF for the top. I would not, even as a later under hardwood, if I were to make this again. I'd double up on counter top, or by a purpose made bench top. (Ikea has discontinued the countertop I'd used. The replacement is hardwood over particle board, which I don't think is suitable for a kitchen, let alone a workbench.)
How much did it cost you overall? As like an estimate?
Didn't really keep track. The vises were somewhere around $200 each, the countertop was about the same. The rest of the lumber and hardware was under $100.
<p>Question: I'm new to this and thinking about tackling the project: did you consider using two dowel centers at the same time when marking the legs rather than one in each position, one at a time - did you have a reason to avoid doing it that way?</p>
Asa Christiana's design only had one dowel for each stretcher. I had started out that way, when I found Sam Allen's book, which used two. I thought that was a good idea, and went back and added the second.<br> <br> I don't see any reason why marking both holes at the same time wouldn't work.
<p>Any specific reason to make the end vise area flush with the base dimensions other than additional stability for the end vise?</p><p>In Asa's workbench, although he doesn't use an end vise that end extend 2-4&quot; from the base legs.</p><p>I plan to add an End vise in the future, but not right away. Just trying to figure out if I keep the 2-4&quot; overhang on that side if I'm setting myself up for worse end vise solution when the time comes.</p>

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