Step 3: Finish up the rough cuts

Once you have drilled and cut all of the holes to roughly the size they need to be peal off the 3M painters tape and the template as one piece. You will now see the rough edges of your cuts. 

Take the actual pieces you want to mount and keep cutting and test fitting them until they all fit. 

From there you can make the box look as good as you want to. Sometimes the holes and rough edges will never show or they dont need alot of work. Its a good idea to take a file to knock off the rough edges and to get the corners perfect. 

After a little bit of work and a good template you should have something that looks close to a laser cut piece of plastic that perfectly holds your buttons, switches and connectors. 
<p>Great work sir! Thanks for sharing.</p>
Very professional looking project. The only thing I would do is enclose that power outlet inside the refrigerator to keep on the safe side. Excellent work and thank you for posting!
Good Job! Beats what I've been doing and very straight forward.
I have used such enclosures for electronic projects for years. They are rugged, water tight (if you use the right gazintas/gazoutas) and relatively cheap. They also come in a range of sizes so you can usually find one to fit your project.<br><br>I also like to use lego bricks to make custom enclosures. Not water tight, and not as rugged as the one in your project, but you can make them really fit your project. The plastic is easy to drill and sometimes the lego adds to the styling of the final product. Clear bricks allow you to keep LEDs inside the unit but still visible. You can get 12&quot; square flat pieces to use as the bottom and then just use bricks as necessary to built the rest.
I use the spray adhesive on the cad template stuck directly on the box. Never had a problem peeling it off when done drilling and cutting. Don't suppose the tape hurts though, just an added step.
I have had issues with removing spray adhesive in the past. Its a pretty easy and cheap step to add the tape rather than try to remove sprayed on glue everywhere.
Not all spray adhesives are created equally. If this doesn't work for you then you're hopeless:<br> <br> <a rel="nofollow">3M Spray Mount Repositionable Adhesive</a><br> <br> But their 45 spray glue should be good enough for doing what you're doing. Just use it right.<br> <br> Also there is <a href="http://www.googone.com/" rel="nofollow">Goo Gone</a> for when you mess up.<br> <br> I don't even bother with the whole measure it, then draw it on the computer nonsense. I just do my layout on the project. The way everything got done before computers were so widespread.<br>
Great instructable. Even though I have the philosophy of never reinvent the wheel I sometimes forget where to look for premade things that can be cheap and easily modified<br><br>I too print my templates to go directly on my work but I print them to full page mailing label stock. I just peel and stick and never had a problem with residue.
I wish I had used this technique when I was building one of my laser light shows...<br>I did use an outdoor electrical box... but I completely failed to plan out the layout and mark where stuff was going... long story short... now I have it taken back apart and now I have a (mostly) useless box... (I might (if I get around to it) post some pictures of how bad I messed up...)

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Bio: I like to take things apart, sometimes they go back together sometimes they end up as something entirely different then where they started.
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