Instructables
Picture of Building an acrylic Classic Macquarium
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The idea of  an aquarium built to fit in a classic Macintosh case, aka Macquarium, has been around for 20 or more years. I didn't invent the Macquarium, but in the mid and late 90s I built several of them and perfected my own unique style of tank.

If you search the internet, you'll find several different plans for building a Macquarium from glass. I always believed acrylic was a better choice because it let me maximize the amount of water in the tank and the bonded seams are quite strong. My design integrates filtration and lighting and provides outstanding access to the tank for cleaning and maintenance.

The pages that follow will tell and show how I build a Macquairum. It's not the only way to do it, but it's my way and I think it's the best way.
 
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Step 1: Taking the Mac Apart

Picture of Taking the Mac Apart
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About those Torx screws...  A T-15 Torx screwdriver with a 6" blade is needed to take the screws out of the  handle and remove the back. If you don't have one, just get out a drill and drill the heads off the screws. Remember, it's never going to be a computer again.

Note that this tutorial illustrates disassembling a Mac 512 model. The SE and Classic versions were slightly different, but I'm confident you can figure it out.


Pic 1- Pry off the programmer's switch (if present) with a screwdriver. Save the switch, we'll use it later.

Pic 2 - Remove the battery door and the Torx screw behind the door. Again, save this piece.

Pic 3 - Remove the two Torx screws from the bottom of the case. Note the "Hyperdrive" sticker. This was an internal hard drive hack for the early Macs. Very cool, very expensive.


Pic 4 - Remove the two Torx screws located deep in the handle recess.


Pic 5 - Remove the back case. There is a special tool designed to separate the case halves, but lacking that you can usually simply position your hands on opposite corners of the back case and slap it upwards - hard. Several times, if necessary. As a last resort, use putty knives to pry the seam open.

Pic 6 - Remove the AC plug on the analog board. Sometimes this plug will be very difficult to remove (extreme heat welds it in place). In that case just cut the wires. Remember, it's never going to be a computer again.

Pic 7 - Remove the plug from the CRT to the analog board.

Pic 8 - Remove the grounding screw attaching the analog board to the frame.

Pic 9 - Remove the analog cable from the logic board.

Pic 10 - Disconnect the anode from the CRT. Note, if this computer has been turned on in the last few weeks, there could be dangerous voltages in the anode. I recommend using a pair of wire cutters with insulated handles to cut the anode wire. If you're certain the computer hasn't been powered up recently, the cap can be removed by sliding a screwdriver under the rubber cap to loose the wires.
twighahn4 years ago
what kind of acrylic do u have touse for fish tanks?certain types kill fish
Sophanny4 years ago
wow, it looks amazing!
bowser824 years ago
Good build! Nice 'ible. MB tank background is great too :-)
Yup. Will need to experiment with acrylic too...
AlKaswa4 years ago
That fish is definitely too large to happily live in that tiny, tiny tank.