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Picture of Building an outdoor chicken coop
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This instructable shows how to build a small outdoor coop for chickens or guinny hens from recycled materials.
 
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Step 1: Get your materials

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To build this project you will need a variety of materials.
The materials include:
-chop saw
-screws
-electric drill
-extension chord
-recycled chicken coop door with hinges
-sledge hammer
-measuring tape
-recycled wood (2x4's and 1x4's)
-four recycled fence posts
-recycled chicken wire
-recycled roof
Also not shown in the pictures:
-wire cutters
-staples
-staple gun or staple hammer
-iron rod
-level
-chain saw or hand saw

Step 2: Beginning the construction

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-First find a place to build the chicken coop. It can be on level ground or slightly sloped ground.

-You should begin by measuring the dimensions of the roof and then make holes in the ground with an iron rod where the fence posts should go based on the roofs dimensions. Then one by one you should pound the fence posts into the ground using a sledge hammer, until all four posts are securely in the ground.

Step 3: Putting support on all the fence posts

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-Cut eight 2x4's about four inches in length using a chop saw. 2x4's will be placed on these later and these smaller pieces give them support and a place for them to screw in to.

-Using a level make sure all eight pieces are screwed into the posts level so the finished project is not on a slope. Three to four screws should be put into each support piece.

Step 4: Putting 2x4's on the support pieces

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-Using a measuring tape find the length between all the posts and then cut 2x4's corresponding to these lengths. Using an electric screw gun screw the 2x4's in until there is one connecting all four posts. The finished step is shown in the second picture below.

Step 5: Three support pieces

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-Using 2x4's or 2x1's (whichever is more available) measure the distance across the bottom 2x4's and cut the support pieces so they fit in the frame. Screw three support pieces into place and you are done this step.

Step 6: Putting support on the top of the fence posts

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-Cut eight 2x4's about four inches in length using a chop saw. 2x4's will be placed on these later and these smaller pieces give them support and a place for them to screw in to.

-Using a level make sure all eight pieces are screwed into the posts level so the finished project is not on a slope. Three to four screws should be put into each support piece.

-The only difference between this step and step three is these support pieces are put closer to the top of the fence posts rather then the bottom.

Step 7: Putting 2x4's on the support pieces

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-Using a measuring tape find the length between all the posts and then cut 2x4's corresponding to these lengths. Using an electric screw gun screw the 2x4's in until there is one connecting all four posts. The finished step is shown in the pictures below.

-The only difference between this step and step 4 is the support pieces are put on the top suport pieces rather then the bottom.

Step 8: Adding a door to the coop

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-The next step is to put the door on the coop. To do this you should measure the dimensions of the door and put in support 2x4's as shown in the photo below.

-The position and orientation of the door depends on the constructor. In the photo the door swings horizontally.

-The support pieces should not touch the door and allow for it to swing completely shut. It is not shown in the photo below but there is a half inch gap between the support pieces and the door.

-Screws are put into the hinges and a latch is put on the door on the opposite end of the hinges.

Step 9: Cutting the top of the fence posts

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-This step requires a hand saw or preferably a chain saw.

-The constructor should cut the top of the four fence posts so that they are level with the top of the 2x4's as shown in the photos below. The second photo is a photo of the completed step.

-This is a dangerous step and the one using the chainsaw should wear protective clothing and eye wear. They should particularly watch out for sparks as the chain saw may possibly hit the screws in the 2x4's.

Step 10: Putting in the floor

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-Using old wire and recycled materials cut this material so that it will fit in the bottom of the coop. Next use a staple gun or staple hammer, staple in the flooring so that is secured to the 2x4's.

-An alternative method to this step can also be completed by using chicken wire and placing cardboard on top of it and then stapling it to the 2x4's.

Step 11: Adding the roof and siding

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-Since the posts are the dimensions of the roof, now the roof can just be placed on top of the four posts and screwed into the 2x4's and fence posts.

-After the roof is securely on, chicken wire is wrapped around the coop. Only one time around the coop is necessary.

-The chicken wire should be wrapped around the door and wire cutters should cut around the door, so that the door can open.

-Using a staple gun or staple hammer staples should be applied at each posts and along each 2x4 so that the chicken wire is securely around the coop and animals can not enter it, protecting the chickens.

-The chicken wire should run from the ground to the top of the roof, so that animals can not get at the chickens from underneath the coop.

Step 12: Adding a ramp

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-The chicken coop is just about finished but a few final steps are needed to touch it up.

-Using an old scrap piece of wood screw in a ramp underneath the door so the chickens can walk in and out of the coop.

-Make sure the ramp does not impede the door from opening.

Step 13: Optional additions

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-Some optional things to add to your coop

-A blanket to shade the chickens from the sun.

-A feeder and water bowl for the chickens (probably a good idea to have)

Step 14: Finished Project

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-Here is some photos of the completed chicken coop.
admin6 years ago
This is a great Instructable, but you need to add a main image of the final project to the intro step. Please do that and leave me a message when you have so that we can publish your work. Thanks!

You should include what you need to put for chickens to roost on . What about nesting boxes ? We get chickens that lay eggs? You are very good at this ! Give us more !

How do you get the coop where the chickens can get in and critters can't ??

TomT92 months ago

you can find how to build a chicken coop for free by go my website

Very nice job! So many people like to over-complicate this kind of thing, but you have kept it good and simple. I was planning to build some chicken coops on the side of a hill and I bet this design would be good for that.
clance4 years ago
I love how you have used recycled material in your chicken coop plans.  I did the same with mine and it is much sturdier than the prefab chicken coops that you can purchase.  I used a set of drawers for nesting boxes in mine and my girls love it!
siki4 years ago
Well, this is something I can get my head around (no I've never constructed anything before). I would need to modify it to make solid walls as I am looking to make a small brooder/time out coop but thanks for taking the time to 'splain this. :-)
troseph5 years ago
I based my chicken coop off this instructable. Particularly the salvaged 4x4 posts.
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warrockdude6 years ago
are those guini chicks?