Introduction: Building the Workshop! // Tiny House

Before we start of:

The whole goal of this project was to make a rain free area for my DIY things and to explore miniature architecture projects. Both targets were achieved, but a rain free area could be done in a simpled manner :p My neighbors are happy me not making too much noise though.

The overall size is 4m by 2.5m by 2.5m high. So about 13.5' by 8' by 8' high. This is no big space but still useable.

This process was a big eye opener for me and it opened a new realm of possible projects. It was fun creating something this big!

If you are interested in the schematics and sizing, this is available from my website:

www.seamm.nl

Step 1: Foundation

Picture of Foundation

This step is the most difficult one because off all the measuring and levelling before the structure was built. First four point were marked on the ground and 4 big concrete tiles were placed there. On top of that 4 beams of the baseframe were just placed. The beams (and inside joists) are cut to length beforehand so they will represent the outside rim of the structure. The four tiles are a tiny bit outside the rim of the structure about 1" or 25mm. There is room for tolerance there. at that point you can check level by useing a level device. Adjust the tiles there if neccesary, I had to place an extra tile at some corners to compensate height differences.If every thing is looking well and level. Step back to check the overall position of the structure. At this point it's easy to adjust a bit.At this point I placed my fifth and sixth tiles.

Step 2: Baseframe

Picture of Baseframe

When that is done measure the diagonal size between the oposing corners, make sure they are the same. Keep on fiddeling and shifting until they are the same. At this point you can drive in the screws or nails and fasten the rim of the baseframe. I used 3 4" - 100mm nails, Although screws are quicker and less fatiguing. When your four corners are tight, check the diagonals again and your level.

To the underside of the rim I placed abreating membrame just to keep water out but let the wood breathe.

Step 3: Poles

Picture of Poles

When all is looking good again I dug 6 holes for 6 3feet or 1m poles. These poles could then be placed and I put some gravel next to the pole in the holes. You could pour some concrete there but I just didn't bother to. When all of that is in place, the poles could be fastended with a big bolt. I used M16 and you could use 3/4'' as well. I was carefull not to overthighten and bend the outer rim to the inside. You could use wooden spacers to prevent that, the poles never are at the exact position next to the rim.

So far this took me about one day, and most of the time went into the measuring and checking. It was a test of my patience ;)

Step 4: Floor Joists

Picture of Floor Joists

When this was done (finally) I could hammer in the joists. Those were 16" on center or 400mm. The beams were 2 by 6's or 44 by 144 mm. I didn't calculate the bending or the stiffness or sag but what i am planning to do, this is sufficient. As long as I'm not putting 500 kg (1000 pound) milling machines in them it OK.

Step 5: Base

Picture of Base

So at this point the baseframe was bolted to the ground and immoveable by human force (not yet point of no return though). The morgning after so to speak. I put in the insulation, Glasswool insulation. On top of that about 3.5 OSB sheets were placed and screwed in. I used a chalk line to help me pinpoint the joists underneath. But other than that there's nothing more to it. The sheets fit in their length to the width of the baseframe, so I didn't need to that much of the sheets.

Step 6: Stud Walls

Picture of Stud Walls

When this base was complete the stud walls were fabricated. The studs were 2 by 2's or 44 by 44mm, I chose this because it left more space on the inside of the structure. I live in an urban area, having a garden is a novelty, having a garden with space for a workshop is rare. So space is relevant. At this point they were cut to length. Next they were hammered together to form the walls. They were 16" or 400mm on center. And I made a 'Header' and 'King stud' situatiation in the front for the double doors. I believe it's called French doors.

Step 7: Erecting Stud Walls

Picture of Erecting Stud Walls

After that the walls were erected and screwed to the floor and eachothers. On top of walls an extra layer of studs were placed, called 'Top plates'. Above the 'Header' one layer of studs were placed to accomodate the roof slope. And on the short sides of the structure the roof joists are placed. The roof slope was about 1 degree. I would not suggest useing such low angle because you will make it hard for yourself. I did this because I was stubborn and liked this design but there is a high chance of a leaking roof.

Step 8: Wall Sheets

Picture of Wall Sheets

So now you could get a grasp at the size of the shed. And when you are done looking and wondering you can add OSB sheets to the stud walls. I paid attention to how the sheets were held up because at this point you can make the stud walls perpendicular to each other. This is the case because you can refence to the factory sides of the OSB sheets.

Step 9:

Picture of

The process of the putting sheets to the walls was simple, hold it up, screw in one, check for perpendicular and screw in the rest. the screws were about 16" or 400 mm apart. Screws are plenty strong so putting in more has not that much added value.

Step 10: Roof Joists

Picture of Roof Joists

Ather that the roof joists were put in place, they are the same size as the baseframe so 2 by 6's or 44 by 144mm. They were 24" or 600mm on center.

Step 11: Roof Sheets

Picture of Roof Sheets

And on top of that the final OSB sheets are put on. We sawed them in half, me and my girlfriend are not that high so a normal size sheet is too much for us.

Step 12: Corrugated Roof Sheets

Picture of Corrugated Roof Sheets

Under the corrugated roof sheets the membrame was put on. When the roof was made water thight the walls were covered with the membrame to keep it from raining wet. And yes this was the point of no return. Putting this amount of work in this project was something you don't discart.

Step 13: Windows

Picture of Windows

So the structure was standing up firmly and waterproof now we can get into a more intricate subproject.I wanted to challenge myself even further to design and make the window's and doors. It worked out but there are a lot of interesting details and I want to put that all in the spot light in a dedicated video and article.

In general the windows are made out of 2 by 4's, 44 by 94mm, I designed a specific profile or cross section. The cuts and material removeal was done on the table saw. When those steps were done, a tenon was made on the long side and a mortise on the short side. This was then glued in place.

For the glass I used tranluced plastic which actually was sheet made out of platic channels. So I had a simple way of a double walled glass sheet. Not beign able to see through the plastic is not visaully perfect but the effect look really cool and the light coming through is nice and diffuse.

Step 14: Doors

Picture of Doors

The doors are actually 4 beams mitered to 45 degrees on both sides. This simple design makes it look very minimal and still easy to glue up. I didn't want to make a special glue mold or jig. And I didn't had the opportunity to use a router and make straight channels were perpedicular wooded pieces could fit in to make a frame.

on the inside of the frame a similar frame was glued, this frame had a rabbet where a similar piece plastic (as the windows) was placed. Because of the miter corners I was afraid of sagging of the door. So far it's holding up, the doors are made one year ago so it's resisting the degradation of time.

Step 15: Siding

Picture of Siding

And the final step was; adding the siding. We chose Douglas Fir for it and theated that with boiled linseed oil. On the front we made a minimalistic impression by placing the panels horizontal, butted up to each other. On the short side with the long windows we use live edge wood and placed it vertically. Personally I like this combination of modern and nature so I'm still happy with this configuration.

On the back side, simple corrugated metal sheets are used, this was for economic reasons as well as endurance of the material.

Well this is the end of the article I hope you liked it and found it useful! :)

Comments

CraftAndu (author)2017-09-18

Really cool workshop, kudos! How much did it cost. Would love to see some photos from the inside when it is "furnished"

McGhee_4 (author)2017-09-18

Nice...

sedski (author)2017-09-16

This is awesome.

aCuriousCreator (author)2017-08-21

This looks great :) I need more space and never sure if to build my own workshop or buy a premade one. This gives a bit more courage to give it a go! Awesome instructable!

He thanks! Oh yea you should go for it! It could be even done simpler or quicker than my process!

Tinkerer1351 (author)2017-08-19

Hello Sebastiaan, First Congrats on a very well done Instructible! well thought out and executed Period. Not to take anything away from it But you are very lucky to live where you are and have access to such beautiful Lumber the quality and stability looks outstanding and I remember what a pleasure it is to work with it, Yes I use to live there! now I live in Canada where you'd think you'd be able to get as good or better but no such luck, I guess we send it all to places like Holland???? cause what's in the lumber markets truly stinks!!!! its twisted and knotted and half the time still has bark on the edges and if it is straight just wait a half hour it will warp yet don't build any doors out of standard lumber like you did!

If you want Quality lumber you have to go to a specialty lumber company and pay specialty prices even for softwoods like you used there.

The world is a funny place! Rant finished ......

Keep up the great work Sebastiaan!!!!

Hi Tinkerer, Thanks for the compliment! Oh man that's not making life easier. Overhere not everything is perfect, I did had to spend some time taking a careful look at the lumber in the store.

Well Sebastiaan that's what we do here "when allowed" But we'd have to go through a lot of piles to find THAT many Straight Clear boards and 2"x 2"s !
The point is that I think the industry can do better, but they just don't.
About it not being perfect there, It's not Perfect Anywhere !!! Right? we all know that but people living in both the Netherlands and in Canada can consider themselves pretty darn Lucky !!!!!

Be Happy, Go Build Something Else !
my next project is a Tiny house.

Ed

1BigMoon (author)2017-08-17

I see you live in the NEtherlands, yet you apparently built a flat roof. Any concerns about snow build up weight?

Hi yeah, it could be, It can handle some weight, maybe 50 kg per m^2. But the snowfall the last winters were not that heavy, maybe 10 cm. If i lived more land inwards it would be a different story.

Water can always find a way :( the way you built the roof, if there ever is an issue, you can easily just raise one side to add a slope.

CptPikachu (author)CptPikachu2017-08-17

still voting for u btw

hey thanks for the support, raising one side is a good suggestion Thanks!

chris_zeel (author)2017-08-17

Looking great!

I was wondering, this is small enough to build without a permit (vergunning)?

And what do all the materials cost? (total price of the shed)

Thanks for responding!

chris_zeel (author)chris_zeel2017-08-17

Okay, I scrolled down through the comments and saw the same question, with answer from you. Apologies!

Hi Chris, thanks! yeah this was small enough for a permit here. Its about 10 m^2.

naeemmalik (author)2017-08-18

looks great, though not clear about the waterproof layer, as to if it was put direct on the ground.

He thanks, the layer held the insulation up aswell.

MichaelS1141 (author)2017-08-18

how thick are the OSB panels?

They are about 18mm, 3/4".

MuthaF (author)2017-08-17

Good Job Sebastian. Is there anything different you would of done now that you've had it a year?

thank you Muthaf, the roof slope could be steeper. Then there would be less chance of wind and water blowing underneath.

JeffH95 (author)2017-08-17

Nice build! One note that (hopefully) won't come back to bite you; if I tried building the foundation that way where I live, it would only be a very short while before I had a family of skunks, racoons, or rats living under it. There needs to be zero clearance with a barrier dug in around it, or sitting on a poured concrete pad, or elevated enough that you can get under it easily to clear weeds and brush and discourage critters that way. The way you built it is exactly the way critters like it; easy for them to get in, tough for you to get under and clear them out. I don't know what kinds of pests you have in your neck of the woods, but I'd recommend trenching around the hut and adding a barricade sub-strata.

Thanks for the heads-up! The only animal which gets underneath is our own cat. Luckely there are no other real critters here. But It's a good point, I'll add it to the article. Don't want anyone having to deal with that.

Oncer (author)2017-08-17

Voted for in all three categories. Thanks for this and can't wait to see how you finished and kitted out the inside. Is there a part two?

Hi Oncer, thank you it's much apprieciated!

Sebastiaan Mollema (author)2017-08-15

Hi Guys,

This was my first instructable. Please let me know what you think and if let know any suggestions. I am not a native English speaker or writer so this department is still under development :p

Enjoy!

You would never know you are not a native speaker and am embarrassingly mono-lingual. With the weather problems you had I just assumed you where in the UK!

Oncer (author) Oncer2017-08-17

Sorry!! That was supposed to say that I am mono-lingual, not you Sebastiaan.

Haha yeah the weather had it's own plans :p Thank you!

You did great! This is a really good looking little structure. Well done on the project itself, as well as the Instructable too. :)

Thanks for commenting and for the compliment!

SuzanneW3 (author)2017-08-17

Let's give a shout-out for the girlfriend's efforts! Being a female also, I encourage all females to take an interest in trying some of the traditionally male projects. They can be fun and rewarding. BTW I am NOT anti-male, I love men and appreciate the real differences between the sexes.

Thanks! I will pass it on!

deluges (author)2017-08-17

Well written and great project. Please update with pictures of the inside!

Thanks for the compliment, Great Idea!

itag123 (author)2017-08-16

Great Instructable! Would love to see the an Instructable for the windows and doors.

Thanks, I will keep you posted! Hope to get to it soon.

Kris82 (author)2017-08-16

Great Job. I can't wait to see the inside. I hope that you use some inovative small space designs.

Hey Thank! Yeah there will be some nice project there! Hope to keep everybody posted!

eamonwalshdiy (author)2017-08-16

Brilliant project Sebastiaan! It looks great well done.

Hi Eamon! it worked out great! thanks for inviting me over!

Did you enter it any of the competitions?

oh yes, the Home improvement one, outdoors, and box i believe

Good Luck!

Millie-Feuille (author)2017-08-16

Looks amazing! A hearty well done from me for all the effort!! :D

Hey thank you for the compliment!

gm280 (author)2017-08-16

Self satisfaction should be your greatest reward. Nicely done and I think you enjoyed the process as well.

Sebastiaan Mollema (author)gm2802017-08-16

Thanks, yes the satisfaction still is rewarding!

TomcastHD (author)2017-08-15

do you mind me asking what something like this costs?

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Bio: I am a maker and here I am sharing the fun stuff of making and creating! Apart from fun my goal is to share knowledge ... More »
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