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A Celtic brooch, called also penannular brooch, made with a scrap piece of thick copper wire.

If you like it vote for me in the contests!

(from wikipedia) Penannular: ("Annular" means formed as a ring and "penannular" formed as an incomplete ring) brooches feature a long pin attached by its head to a ring; the pin can move freely around the ring as far as the terminals. There is a gap between the terminals wide enough for the pin to pass through. Beginning as utilitarian fasteners in the Iron Age and Roman period, and in Ireland and Scotland from about 700 to 900, which are popularly known as Celtic brooches or similar terms. The brooches were worn by both men and women, usually singly at the shoulder by men and on the breast by women.

Step 1: WHAT YOU NEED

MATERIAL:

-a scrap piece of thick copper wire (I tried with 12, 10 and 8 gauge and they all worked well, in this tutorial I'm using the 10 gauge).

TOOLS:

-hammer;

-hard still surface;

-round nose pliers;

-file;

-wire cutter;

-ring mandrel (or a tube of desired diameter).

Step 2: ANNEAL

Anneal the copper wire, it will make it more easy to work with.

Use pliers, as it became super hot!

Step 3: BEND

Bend the copper wire around your tube.

Step 4: CUT

Cut the piece almost to a full circumference, but not quite.

Step 5: HAMMER

Hammer the whole piece a bit,, and the edges more, so they will look like the ones in the photo.

Step 6: FILE

File the edges.

Step 7: CUT ANOTHER PIECE

Cut another piece of copper, longer than the diameter of the brooch.

Step 8: HAMMER AGAIN

Hammer the whole piece a bit.

Hammer flat an edge of about 1 cm (photo 1).

Hammer the other edge large (photo 2).

Step 9: CUT THE EDGE

Cut the edge you hammer large (not the 1 cm flat one, the other) like a point.

Step 10: FILE

File the two edges.

Step 11: WRAP

Wrap the 1 cm flat edge with the round nose pliers.

Insert it in the brooch.

Close it.

Step 12: HOW IT WORK

So the wrap that you made around the brooch should be large enough to allowed the spike to move freely around it, but small enough to be stopped by the wide edges.

The spike should be longer than the brooch, so it will be stopped by it, ones the brooch is in place.

The space between the two large edges of the brooch should be wide enough to allow the spike to pass by.

Step 13: PLACE IT

Open the brooch wide and insert the spike in the shawl (or whatever you are using it on).

Close the brooch.

Turn it (all the way behind the spike), and close it.

Step 14: DONE

Done!

You want one, but you don't feel to make one? Here is the ones I sell!

<p>Very nice - thanks for sharing!</p>
<p>You are welcome!</p>
I thought my wife would like one of these, so I made one last night.<br><br>I didn't have copper, the s-hook I found in my shop is some sort of mild steel, so it took a lot more work that I initially planned on. my shop heater was able to get hot enough to turn red, but not the straw yellow that I'd have liked for hammering it.<br><br>However, I think it turned out pretty good. I attached some pictures I snapped during the process. I wasn't able to get the closure as tight around as I'd have liked, so it's possible to slip past the flares, which is not ideal. I just don't quite have the shaping tools (and skills) to pound the flare wider and flatter, or to make the closure tighter.<br><br>It was a good first use for the salvaged bench vise I recently got that I haven't cleaned up yet. I did all my hammering with a regular framing hammer, and used some files and pliers for shaping. I finally took it too my drill press and buffed it to a dullish sheen - I like that it looks sort of rugged and aged.
<p>It look super cool! Like something from the iron age, thanks for posting the pic.</p><p>(about the closure ring I think it may be easier to snap close if you cut away few more millimeters from the edge) </p>
I was thinking that too, but it got late. I couldn't snip it normally, I had to hammer my cutters closed on it.i might try that tonight and then re-file that end so it doesn't snag later. <br><br>I'll let you know how it goes.<br><br>thanks for the I spiraling, this was a fun project.<br><br>also, I can't favorite your 'ible for some reason, it never adds. Other ones work, so if others have that problem you might want to ask about it. I'm using the most recent android app on a Galaxy S6.
<p>If you have a small drill bit and some wire, you could rivet the pin to itself, thus closing the circle and tightening the eyehole's diameter. Drill through the pin where they overlap. Using a softer metal like brass or copper wire for the rivet wire will make your life easier. Tap the ends of the wire piece so they flare out, snuggling the two sides of the pin stem together, closing up the eye so that it won't slip off the end of the brooch. Might work.</p>
I meant to say, thanks for the inspiration! autocorrect messed me up.
<p>You are welcome! Let me know how it goes.</p><p> (I will look at the favorite thing)</p>
<p>Very cool! I love these brooches, and had never thought to make one--you make it super-simple to follow along!</p>
<p>Thank you!</p>
<p>Very well done marcellahella! Simplicty at its best, I just love it!</p>
<p>Thanks!!</p>
<p>Oh, thank you! I knew I was going to need to make something to hold closed the wrap my dear daughter in law knitted and sent to me. This will be just perfect! I love that it's all in one piece as we have and foster Cairn Terriers and I wouldn't want one to swallow a small piece!</p>
<p>You are welcome! If you do let me know how they turn out!</p>
<p>Oh, thank you! I knew I was going to need to make something to hold closed the wrap my dear daughter in law knitted and sent to me. This will be just perfect! I love that it's all in one piece as we have and foster Cairn Terriers and I wouldn't want one to swallow a small piece!</p>
<p>So, you annealed the copper to soften it, can you heat treat it to make it harder? </p>
<p>I don't know about heat treat it to make it harder, but when you hammer it, it became super hard again.</p>
<p>True, work hardening would for sure do it, especially with copper. </p>
<p>Awesome! Enter this in the jewelry contest...gets my vote!</p>
<p>It is in the jewelry contest, thanks for the support!</p>
Great instructable. I love the simple elegance of the finished brooch.
<p>Thanks for the nice comment!</p>
<p>Are you using any kind of finish to keep the copper from turning green?</p>
<p>No, I like the natural patina that copper get after a wile. Also copper items generally don't turn green if they don't get wet, just a darker color patina. </p><p>Also for example bracelets and rings if they get used a lot they stay super polished naturally, for some reason. They may just leave some green on the finger, that I don't mind.</p><p>But there is many waxes and other product available, if you like a shiny look.</p>
<p>No, I like the natural patina that copper get after a wile. Also copper items generally don't turn green if they don't get wet, just a darker color patina. </p><p>Also for example bracelets and rings if they get used a lot they stay super polished naturally, for some reason. They may just leave some green on the finger, that I don't mind.</p><p>But there is many waxes and other product available, if you like a shiny look.</p>
I've made some of these in the past when I was involved with an historical society. I haven't done it in a long time, and this seems like a nice quick gift I can make in the days before Christmas.<br><br>great 'ible!
<p>Thank you! Will love to see a pic if you do! I saw online many different version too, some have the edges curled up like a spiral (instead of hammered flat) they look really nice too.</p>
I am electrician and I have acess to plenty of wire. I love this instructable and will be making lots of them. thank you very much for sharing.
<p>You are welcome! I'm happy somebody will use the instructable and the scrap copper</p>

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