Introduction: Cable Tie Mesh Piece

Picture of Cable Tie Mesh Piece

I love working with unconventional materials, and the hardware store is a treasure trove of inspiration. In this Instructable, I'm showing a really simple (and cheap!) way of creating a dramatic art piece combining cable ties and mesh.

I've been fiddling with cable ties for a few years now. I mainly work them into neckpieces, so for this Instructable, I'm using the cable tie mesh as a statement neckpiece.

Step 1: Cutting the Mesh Backing

Picture of Cutting the Mesh Backing

This green PVC mesh came in a roll at the hardware store. Metal wire meshes would work great too, just that the edges would be tougher to cut and the edges would need a bit more finishing work.

When getting the mesh, just make sure that the width of the cable tie fits comfortable through. The diagonal crisscross pattern works especially well with the concept. Meshes with a square grid pattern might work, but I think they'll look a little dead.

Here, I've settled on a chevron shape, so I marked it out with a marker and cut out with a cutter. Scissors would cut through this easily, I just like to be a little OCD with my edges.

Step 2: Finishing on Mesh

Picture of Finishing on Mesh

For the raw, unfinished feel, go ahead and leave the mesh as it is.

I'm using black cable ties for this project, so I have a strong compulsion to make the mesh gold, because *BLACK AND GOLD*. Spray painted the mesh gold; this can of gold produced a more brassy shade of gold.

The colour options for the mesh are endless. Go wild!

P.S. When spray painting, do multiple gentle thin layers instead of aggressively trying to drown your piece.

(You can see my wet puddle of paint in the photo. Forgive me, I was very anxious to get to the cable ties on it.)

Step 3: Cable Ties Onto Mesh

Picture of Cable Ties Onto Mesh

Start off at the bottom of the mesh.
2 units on mesh = 1 cable tie
Cable tie goes through bottom hole, back up the hole on top.
Feed through the head and zip it up!

I'm doing a 'brick wall' pattern with the cable ties for a denser, fuller look.

(I'm using 150mm black cable ties.)

Step 4: Cable Tie Mesh Completion

Picture of Cable Tie Mesh Completion

I attached chains to the mesh piece and VOILA! A statement neckpiece.

Wear it short or wear it long!

Step 5: My Chainmaille Mesh Version

Picture of My Chainmaille Mesh Version

My collection of cable tie pieces involve me dyeing white nylon cable ties, and then weaving them with jump rings into a mesh piece. For more photos of my past experimentations, check out my Facebook album.

Comments

BrianJewett (author)2013-05-08

I'm curious if the color variation is from a varied time in the dye or do you mix different batches?

theKANG (author)BrianJewett2013-05-08

It's different batches of dyes. I'd dye a base colour, then do a dip-dye in another.

vincent7520 (author)2013-03-27

doesn't the dye transfer to clothes and stains them ?…

theKANG (author)vincent75202013-03-27

no they don't! the cable ties are basically permanently stained with the dye colour.

vincent7520 (author)theKANG2013-03-28

I love the idea.

Many thanks for sharing !

Onyx Ibex (author)2013-03-27

The dyeing idea is really cool and looks brilliant!

Penolopy Bulnick (author)2013-03-27

Very cool idea! I love those two tone ones!

About This Instructable

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Bio: My name is Kang and I am based in Singapore. I like making stuff. I like making new stuff from old stuff. I enjoy working ... More »
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