Step 5: Carbon Fiber Draft Beer Dispensing Stereo Cooler

After sealing joints, cracks, and holes, a simple primer coat was added.  Thinking it was a good idea, I added dry wall corner molding to help give more rounded effect. 

Note: This step was not required.  I later added top cap which I carefully routered and shaped by hand.  In short, end results looked great but added allot of extra time to the project.
<p>Maybe a dumb question but how do you fill the 2 gallon keg with beer?</p>
<p>Good question. Gravity fed 5 liter kegs of Warsteiner into 2 gal vessel couple days prior to taking out. Put 5L kegs and empty 2 gallon vessel in freezer for a bit to try to retain some of CO2. After topping off (actually over filling), placed back in refrigerator connected to CO2 bottle and forced CO2 back into beer. Would roll keg around couple times a day and adjust CO2 (you can hear gas going into the liquid and see pressure drop). Not perfect, but good enough for me. Buddy also has keg fridge and did almost the same thing but reversed filled (pumped beer from hose connected to tap in through outlet side of 2 gallon vessel and controlled a slow bottom-up flow by valve on discharge. This worked very well and required very little CO2 injection. </p>
<p>Man you did an awesome job on this cooler! </p>
very nice i really like it have considered as my next project my cooler has a trailer hich on the back but nothing really to tow so a cooler boat to go with my cooler truck might be just the thing
Very nice, but why carbon fiber? It seems like fiberglass would have been more than adequate.
Good question and very true. Fiberglass would have been more than adequate, easier to work with, allow for more design flexibility, and cheaper. <br> <br>Thinking back... I'd seen a couple fiberglass stereo coolers on the web, always wanted to work with carbon fiber, materials were available, and the idea seemed too over the top to pass up. Truth be told, I thought the whole concept very humorous. :) <br> <br>Note: It has survived 5 river trips so far and I still don't know if it is bullet-proof. <br> <br> <br> <br>
Wow, now this is a cooler!
Basically you built an esky/cooler with a tap &amp; stereo. <br> <br>Three questions. <br> <br>1. how waterproof is it. in the last step it's in a raft, if the raft &quot;develops buoyancy problems&quot; will the electronics die? <br> <br>2. related to 1, is it self buoyant? <br> <br>3. did you have any problems with the short beer line?
Good questions. <br> <br>Very true, I took common ideas and combined them. In the past, I've built several radio coolers for outdoor activities and even modified an over the counter cooler to dispense draft beer. For me, it was to see if I could employ carbon fiber technology to limit foot print, increase portability (1 person load/unload, enhance mobility (wheels), provide multi-directional quality sound (nice when floating with a group of people), increase durability (in a sense bullet-proof), fit inside a cooler float, and dispense enough home brew to make it through the day. <br> <br>As for waterproof, yes &amp; no. Given current status, the electronics are subject to water damage. Sealing the two small 3/8&quot; holes for speaker wire pass-through, sealing 1&quot; pass-through hole for charger wire, adding water-tight stereo cover (done), and adding light gasket material on compartment doors would bring it there. (Had plans to do such but summer came faster than expected.) In addition, speaker holes, drain inserts, axle insert, and beer spigot hole were sealed to guard against water migrating between layers. <br> <br>As a side note, marine speakers are very water resistant, but I would hardly consider them water proof. But sealing 3/8&quot; hole would keep electronics compartment dry if the speaker membrane failed. <br> <br>So to fully answer question #1 :) When rented cooler float pops, I will just tie it to another tube and float it down the river and salvage what is salvageable. I better add modifications listed earlier. Doing such, should make it water proof and you can listen to music as long as marine speakers hold out. Worse case scenario, you would just have to replace a speaker or two. <br> <br>It is very buoyant, but not self buoyant. When tossed into a pool it floated on its side while playing &quot;Love Me Do&quot; by the Beatles. In the design phase I considered alternate pontoon designs w/ recessed wheels, but scraped them because of increased foot print and holding to the idea that it would be used for family picnics and camping trips. After the pool scenario I did sketch out two 6&quot;W x 28&quot;L carbon fiber pontoons which simply fasten under speakers (basically a cradle). But given the amount of time already spent, it was put on hold till next winter. <br> <br> <br>Lastly, was very pleased with CO2 and temperature issues in the beer system. Measuring the 3/16&quot; beer line again, it came out to be 8' (extra hose coiled around base of 2 gallon keg). This was sufficient (for me) to keep beer cool and control foaming. <br> <br>Thanks for your interest and questions <br> <br> <br> <br>
You might want to fix the step titles, other than that, great!
Hats off to you fine sir. :D<br>

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