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At certain angles, the pendants made in this style remind me of the tilt'a'whirl my friends and I used to ride at the fair every year when I was a kid. At other angles, for some strange reason, I just want to tie dye them. They make me remember all those times when I would burst out laughing for no reason at all, and keep laughing and laughing and laughing. For me, they evoke a feeling of sheltered innocence. The kind of freedom you feel as a child running through the county fair, looking for the next “thrill” to ride, or twirling round and round in circles until you become so dizzy you fall, laughing with glee.

This tutorial teaches you how to make a relatively simple border wrap and embellish it whimsical woven swirls. So far I have not been able to duplicate, exactly, any of the designs I have made in this style. For that reason, please do not think of this tutorial as directions that are set in stone. They are really more of a set of techniques combined in a certain way to achieve a certain type of look. These pendants can end up elegant and graceful, fun and spirited, modern and industrial, or anything in between!

For the pendant in the photos, I am using round wire for the frame wires. You can also use square wire if you prefer. Also, if you are not able to get half round wire in your area, you can use 22g round wire that has been hammered to slightly flatten it. Just be sure to hammer it as evenly as possible all the way down the full length of the wire.

You will need to use my Basic Weaving Techniques tutorial as a reference to complete this project. You can find it here: https://www.instructables.com/id/Wire-Jewelry-Making-Basic-Weaving-Techniques/

Materials:
• 25’ of 28g Round Dead Soft Wire
• 7” of 20g Half Round Half Hard Wire
• 54” of 20g Round Dead Soft Wire
• 1 25mm round cabochon

Tools:
• Chain nose pliers
• Round nose pliers
• Wire cutters
• Flat nose pliers
• Bent nose pliers
• Ruler
• Marker
• Tape (optional)

Step 1:

Cut the 20g wire into 6 equal pieces (about 9” long). Separate the wires into 2 groups of 3 wires. Using the tape, wrap each group in three areas. One wrap on each end and one in the middle. Take care to be sure that the bundles, when wrapped, lay flat and no wires are crossing.

Step 2:

Determine the center of each bundle and mark the spot using the marker. As you can see, I had to mark mine on the tape. That’s ok. You can transfer the mark to the wire later.

Step 3:

On both bundles, measure 20mm from the center mark, and put another mark there on the wires.

Step 4:

Hold the two bundles together making sure the marks are lined up. Wrap them together with the half round wire. Start wrapping at the line made in the previous step, and wrap going away from the center.

Step 5:

Just above the binding from the previous step, bend the wires outward at a 90º angle.

Step 6:

Remove the tape from one side and transfer the center mark to the wire. (If you need to, you can measure 20mm away from the top of the binding).

Step 7:

Bind the wires together at the center mark. This time, try to keep the wraps centered on the mark.

Step 8:

Repeat steps 6&7 on the opposite side.

Step 9:

Shape the wires around the cabochon. If you have something else that is the exact same size as the cabochon to shape the wires around (such as a pill bottle, mandrel, or wire wrapping template) that can make this step much easier. However, you need to use the actual cabochon for the next step.

Step 10:

Find where the wires intersect on the side directly opposite the first binding and mark all the wires with the marker.

Step 11:

Remove the wires from the cabochon and bend the wires outward at the marks from the previous step at approximately a 90º angle.

Step 12:

Fit the wires around the stone, holding the wires together at the bend you just made, to see if it frames the cabochon correctly. It should have a snug fit, but not so snug that the wires sort of “climb up” the sides of the cabochon. You made need to adjust the bends a little bit to get the right fit. Just be careful not to over work the wire while doing the adjustments.

Step 13:

Bundle the wires together so that you now have a circle with “stems” coming out of both the top and bottom.

Step 14:

Using your bent nose pliers, (or needle nose pliers if you prefer) bend the wires outward on each side of each of the bindings so that you create a sort of basket for the cabochon to sit in.

As you can see in this photo, the bindings started to come a little bit loose. If this happens to you, you can simply push it back down with your pliers. You may have to do this several times as you go.

Step 15:

Set the cabochon into the basket, flat side against the wires bent out in the last step.

Step 16:

Bend the wires on the front of the stone inward and over the stone the same way you did the wires for the back.

As you can see, mine isn’t exactly perfect. Fortunately the swirls will hide all of that.

Step 17:

At this point you need to decide which side will be the top and which side will be the bottom. There should be almost an equal amount of wire at both sides, so the choice is entirely up to you.

Bend the two wires in the back of the top of the pendant backwards at about a 90º angle. You don’t need to be precise here. You’re just moving them out of the way right now.

Step 18:

Holding the two front wires together, bend them over to the right hand side. Again, just getting them out of the way.

Step 19:

Now, bend the last two wires over to the left hand side.

Step 20:

Cut a 4’ piece of 28g wire. Wrap it around the top wire on the left hand side of the pendant about 5 times.

In this picture, I haven’t cut the tail wire yet (ok, so, I really forgot). You can go ahead and cut that now if you like. It will be easier than trying to reach it later.

Step 21:

*Note: At this point, you need to refer to the Basic Weaving Techniques tutorial. You will be using a technique similar to Weave 4 in that lesson (weaving around a curve). The main difference here is that, because the wires are farther apart, and the curve is more pronounced, you will wrap the wire 5 times around the outer curve instead of just once.

Bring the wire down between the two frame wires, around the bottom wire, then back up and between the frame wires again, and to the back of the top wire.

Step 22:

At this point you need to shape the frame wires. Bring the bottom frame wire (the inner curve wire) down and across the front of the pendant, keeping a small curve at the base of the wire. Shape the top frame wire to a curve that is wider and looser than the bottom wire.

The exact curve here is not that important. What is important is that you like the shape of it. As I said earlier on in the lesson, this is more of a collection of techniques and a way to combine them.

Also, keep in mind that you will continue to shape the frame wires as you weave. This makes it easier to get into the spaces to do the weaving than it would be if you shaped the entire frame first.

Step 23:

Back to the weaving again (the fun part).

Wrap the 28g wire around the top frame wire 5 times.

Step 24:

As in step 21, bring the wire down between the two frame wires, around the bottom wire, then back up and between the frame wires again, and to the back of the top wire.

Step 25:

Keep weaving in this manner until you have a section that is about ¼ of a circle.

While you weave, keep pushing the weave together by pushing on the wire with your fingernail (or with the edge of a thin metal ruler if you don’t want to mess up you manicure). You will need to do this throughout the entire project.

Step 26:

Now you need to shape the curve a little more.

Bring the inner curve frame wire upwards to sharpen the curve a little bit.

Bend the outer curve frame wire a little bit more too, keeping the wires about the same distance from each other as they were before.

Step 27:

Continue weaving around the curve as before until you are almost reach the binding wire at the top of the pendant.

Step 28:

Now you will need to refer to the Basic Weaving Techniques lesson again. You will be using weave 3.

Using the weave mentioned above, and keeping the wires parallel to each other, weave a short section. You will stop where the outer curve wire reaches the top of the cabochon.

Step 29:

Now you will need to shape the wires again. Shape the wire that was the inner curve frame wire so that it follows the edge of the cabochon.

Shape the other wire so that it is almost parallel to the first wire, following the same curve.

*Note: at this point, the inner and outer curve wires trade places. What was the inner curve wire before is now the outer curve wire, and vice versa.

Step 30:

Continue weaving around the curve. Because this is a milder curve, you will be wrapping the outer curve wire (remember, the wires switched places in the previous step) only twice on each weave. You will be wrapping the inner curve wire once on each weave (this is actually a combination of weaves 3 and 4 in the Basic Weaving Techniques tutorial). Continue weaving until you are about 1/8” away from the top of the binding wire on the side of the pendant.

Step 31:

Now you need to shape the wires again. Bring what is now the inner curve wire upwards to sharpen the curve. Let the outer curve wire stay along the edge of the cabochon.

Step 32:

Because the frame is widening again, weave this section the same way you wove the beginning of the curve (5 wraps on the outer curve wire).

You only need to weave a small section here. Just until the weave reaches the top of the binding wire on the side of the pendant.

Step 33:

At this point, bend the outer curve wire to the back of the pendant.

Step 34:

Using what’s left of the weaving wire, coil the inner curve wire to a length of  5/8”.

Step 35:

Cut the 28g wire close to the frame wire and press it against the frame wire with your pliers. Cut the frame wire to about 1/8” away from the end of the coil. File the frame wire flat (or rounded with a wire rounder/cup burr).

Step 36:

Spiral the coiled wire and press is against the cabochon. Let it overlap the weave just a little to hide the inside of the curve.

Step 37:

Turn the pendant over. Position the 2nd frame wire so that it is over the closest “basket wire” that is used to hold the cabochon in on the back.


As you can see, I forgot to clean the adhesive off the back of this stone. Um.... Ooops.

Step 38:

Cut the wire so that there is only about 4-5mm extending past the basket wire. File the end of the wire.

Step 39:

Using your round nose pliers, create a small hook at the end of the frame wire.

Step 40:

Lift the basket wire just a little bit, and insert the end of the hook between the basket wire and the stone.

Step 41:

Using your needle nose pliers or bent nose pliers (whichever is more comfortable for you) close the hook so that is wraps around the basket wire.

Step 42:

Turn the pendant back over to the front again.

Begin shaping the two front wires so that they make a curve in the opposite direction as the first woven swirl you just finished.

Step 43:

Cut another 4’ piece of 28g wire and wrap the end around the outer curve wire 5 times (it may be easier to make the wraps towards the end of the wire and slide it into place afterwards). Don’t forget to cut the tail wire off of the beginning of the wrap.

Step 44:

Start weaving the same way you wove the first swirl (5 wraps on the outer curve wire). Shape the outer curve wire as you go, until you have about a half of a circle complete.

Step 45:

Pull the inner curve wire around so that it makes a circle, meeting itself where the weave was started.

Step 46:

Continue weaving in the same fashion, shaping the outer wire and making adjustments to the inner wire as you go, until you have a full circle.

Step 47:

Using what is left of the weaving wire, coil 5/8” of the inner curve wire.

Step 48:

Cut the coiling wire and press it against the frame wire.

Cut the frame wire so that it is about 1/8” above the coil. File it smooth.

Step 49:

Spiral the coiled wire and press it into the center of the swirl.

Bring the outer curve wire downward behind the swirl you just made.

Step 50:

Turn the pendant over.

Cut the wire you just pushed to the back so that it is about 3/8-1/2” long (after the weave).

Step 51:

Curve the wire downward and wrap it around the base of the swirl, pressing it into the space between the 2nd swirl and the binding wire.

Step 52:

Bend the two back wires up straight again. You will be using these for the bail.

Decide how wide you want the bail to be. On this pendant, it will be hidden behind the swirls so I am going to keep it narrow. If your swirls aren’t big enough to hide the bail, you may be better off with a wider bail. The width you want the bail to be will determine how wide to space the wires.

Step 53:

Cut about 2’ of 28g wire. Wrap it around one of the two bail wires a few times.

Step 54:

Since this one is going to be a narrow bail, I’m just using weave 3 from the Basic Weaving Techniques lesson. If you would prefer a different type of weave, that is ok too.

Weave a section of about 1”.  You can make this part a little bit longer if you need a larger bail for a thicker cord.

Step 55:

Curve the woven section of the wires backwards so that the two ends of the weave meet.

On this one I have pushed the bail backwards a little bit to make it easier to work the next step. If you do this too, just make sure to push it back into place once you are finished with the bail.

Step 56:

Wrap the wires together at the base of the bail. I wrapped about 5 times for this one.

Step 57:

On the back of the pendant again, wrap the 28g wire around one of the 20g wires just below the binding from the previous step. Cut the coiling wire and press it close to the frame wire.

Do NOT cut either of the frame wires yet.

Step 58:

Cut another 4’ piece of 28g wire. Wrap it around one of the wires coming out at the bottom of the back of the bail (the one that wasn’t wrapped in the last step. Push the 28g wire up against the bottom of the.

Step 59:

Shape the frame wires so that one of them is in front of the pendant and the other on is going along the edge of the cabochon.

This step is shown here from both the front and back so you can get a better view.

Step 60:

Begin weaving using Weave 3 of the Basic Weaving Techniques tutorial. Weave a short section, just to where it looks like the weave is straddling the front basket wire holding the cabochon in place when viewed from the side.

Step 61:

At his point you need to start shaping the wires into a curve. This curve is going to go towards the back. Bring the wire along the edge (the inner curve wire) upwards at a sharper curve than the other wire (outer curve wire).

Step 62:

Weave this curve the same way you did the other large curves, with 5 wraps on the outer curve wire for each weave. Keep going until the weave looks like it is along the edge of the pendant.

Step 63:

Shape the wires so that they continue the curve, allowing the wires to slowly come close to each other toward the end of the curve. For this pendant, the wires ended up about 1/8” away from each other. That measurement does not have to be exact though.

Step 64:

Keep weaving as before until you have what looks to be about a ½ circle.

Step 65:

Coil the inner curve wire with the end of the weaving wire to about 5/8” long. Cut the coil wire and press it close to the 20g wire. Cut the 20g wire 1/8” above the coil and file it smooth.

Step 66:

Spiral the coiled wire and press it against the center of the swirl.

Step 67:

Bend the outer curve wire behind the pendant.

Step 68:

Cut it so that it extends only about 4-5mm past the basket wire that it lays across.

Step 69:

Create a hook and close it around the basket wire the same way you did the other one.

Step 70:

Turn the pendant upside down.

You will be working with the wires that are in the back first, so you will need to bend the two front sets of wires out of the way. Holding the 2 front wires together, curve them to the left hand side GENTLY. You have to be careful not to overwork the wires while you are moving them out of the way.  Do the same to the second set of two wires, bending them to the right hand side.

Step 71:

For this part it will be easier to see what you are doing if you work from the back of the pendant.

Cut a 5’ piece of 28g wire and wrap it around the base of one of the wires 5 times. Cut the beginning tale off of the coil.

Step 72:

Curve the wires to the right hand side (if working from the front of the pendant, it will be the left hand side). Keep them spaced as far as you would like them to be, depending on how big you want this part of the curve to be.

Step 73:

Turn the pendant over again and start weaving around the curve.

Weave until you have about ¼ of a circle.

The weave should be pushed together better than it is in the picture. I just wasn’t able to hold onto it while taking this shot.

*Note: You may have to move the front wires out of the way as I did here. Just be careful not to overwork them or they could break.

Step 74:

Curve the wires inward a little bit more, then continue weaving.

Step 75:

Weave until you have a ½ circle.

Step 76:

After the half circle is complete, keep the wires parallel and start weaving using weave 3 of the Basic Weaving Techniques lesson. Keep weaving until it is even with the edge of the cabochon.

Step 77:

Curve the wires outward to create another swirl going in the opposite direction as the first half swirl you’ve already made with these frame wires. The only real rule there is here is that the outside of this curve has to meet up with the outer frame wire of the curve on the opposite side of the pendant (in this case, the very first swirl that you wove for this pendant).

Step 78:

Begin weaving around the curve again the same way the other curves were done.

Step 79:

Once you are about half way around the curve (about ¼ circle) bend the wire that is inside the curve upwards. Check to see if you need to make any adjustments to the outer curve wire to be sure that it will meet the outer curve wire of the opposite side as mentioned in step 77.

Step 80:

For this part I’ve turned the pendant right-side up again so it is easier to see.

Continue weaving until you reach the point where the two outer curve wires meet.

Step 81:

Bring the weaving wire up from the bottom of the curve as if you were still weaving and wrap it one full time around the outer curve wire.

It should be pushed closer to the rest of the weave. I’ve let it come away from the weave for this picture so you can see it easier.

Step 82:

Bring the wire up over the outer curve wire from the swirl on top, insert it behind the outer curve wire from the top swirl and bring it back up between the two wires as if you were weaving the two wires together.

Step 83:

Wrap the wire once around the outer curve wire from the bottom swirl.

Step 84:

Repeat step 82.

Step 85:

Bring the weaving wire back down to the inner curve wire as if you were continuing the weave.

Step 86:

Shape the frame wires so that they make almost a full circle, allowing them to come closer together as they reach the end of the curve.

Step 87:

Continue weaving around the curve till you come just short of a full circle.

Step 88:

Coil the weaving wire onto the inner curve wire for about 5/8”. Cut the coil wire close to the frame wire and press is tight with your pliers.

Cut the frame wire 1/8” from the top of the coil and file it smooth.

Step 89:

Spiral the coiled wire and press it into the center of the swirl.

Step 90:

Bend the outer curve wire to the back of the pendant. Position it so that it crosses the closest basket wire.

Step 91:

Cut the outer curve wire so that it extends about 4-5mm past the basket wire.

Step 92:

Attach the outer frame wire to the basket wire on the back of the pendant the same way the other two were attached.

Step 93:

At this point you will be working with the middle set of two wires.

Cut a 5’ piece of 28g wire and wrap it around the frame wire on the right hand side 5 times. Cut the tail wire.

Step 94:

Shape the wires into the desired curve shape. For this one I’m making it a little bit smaller than the curve from the last swirl on this pendant, however, you can make yours the same size or larger if you like.

Step 95:

Begin weaving around this curve the same way you wove the other curves. Stop when the weave reaches the edge of the cabochon on the outer curve wire.

Step 96:

Weave a small section using Weave 3 of the Basic Weaving Techniques tutorial. Stop when you reach the wire used to hold the cabochon in place on the front of the pendant.

Step 97:

On this one you’ll be reversing the curve the same way we did on the last swirl. Again, the only rule is that the outside of this curve has to meet up with the outer frame wire of the curve on the top of this side of the pendant

Step 98:

Weave around the curve, continuing to shape the frame wires as needed, until you reach the point where the two outer curve wires meet.

Step 99:

Attach the two outer frame wires together the same way the outer frame wires were attached on the other side of the pendant (steps 81-85).

Step 100:

Continue shaping and weaving the curve until you have a full circle.

Step 101:

Coil the inner curve wire with the weaving wire. You’ll need a coil that is about 5/8” long. Cut the coil wire and press it close to the frame wire.

Cut the frame wire 1/8” above the coil and file it smooth.

Step 102:

Spiral the coiled wire and press it into the center of the swirl.

Step 103:

Turn the pendant over and bring the outer curve wire across the back. Position it so that it lays across the nearest basket wire.

Step 104:

Cut the outer curve wire about 4-5mm past the basket wire.

Step 105:

Attach the wire to the basket wire.

Step 106:

Now you will be working with the two front wires.

You will need to unbend them carefully so that they don’t get brittle and break.

Step 107:

Cut a 4’ piece of 28g wire and attach it to the wire that you choose to be the outer curve by wrapping it 5 times. For this pendant, I am going to use the right hand wire as the outer curve wire.

Psst.... don’t forget to cut the tail wire. ;)

Step 108:

Start shaping the curve the same way the other curves were begun.

Step 109:

Step 1:

Weave this curve, shaping as you go along, until you have a complete circle.  It is difficult to see the exact shape of the swirl in this picture because of the wires behind it. On the inset picture you will see a red line that follows the shape of the outer curve. The vertical line is to show you where the ends of the outer curve are.

Step 110:

Using the end of the weaving wire, coil a length of 1½” on the outer curve wire. Cut the coil wire and press the end close to the frame wire.

Do NOT cut the frame wire yet.

Step 111:

Using another piece of wire, make a coil on the Inner frame wire that is 1½” long. Cut the tail ends and press them close to the frame wire.

Again, do NOT cut he frame wire yet.

Step 112:

You will be working with the inner frame wire first.

Carefully make a swirl with the inner curve wire that will cover just the center of the woven swirl you just made.

The insert on the picture shows the shape of the swirl outlined in red to help you see it better.

Step 113:

Cut the frame wire about 1/8” inch from the coil. File it smooth.

Step 114:

Create a spiral underneath the swirl you made in step 112.

Step 115:

Now, with the outer curve wire, make a loop above the swirl from step 112.

Step 116:

Cut the frame wire about 1/8” past the end of the coil. File it smooth.

Step 117:

Spiral the end of the outer frame wire and place the spiral wherever you like. For this one, I put it beside the loop.

Step 118:

Sit back, take a deep breath and admire your work. It’s finally done!
<p>thank you for this wonderful page!! I do wire wrapping as well; you can find me on Facebook if you'd like. I do give aways and special offers, and I believe very strongly in treating one another as teachers and artists rather than competition. The work it took to do these tutorials embodies that!</p>
<p>I am thrilled to have found your tutorial page! Your instructions are so thorough yet your designs leave much room for interpretation which is important because no two stones are the same. I used this technique to wrap a little amethyst chunk and I am thrilled with the results. The addition of this technique to my repertoire has really taken my jewelry making to the next level!! Thank you so much for this tutorial. If you would like to see the jewelry I make, the instagram for my shop is @aloha.oregon :) keep up the wonderful work!</p>
<p>I have to say that your tutorial was wonderful and taught me a lot about weaving a pendant. I made some similarly afterward, not the same, but with the techniques. I then have started branching into my own touches even more. How do you prefer credit given? </p>
Ohw... This could be much more than Carnival acessories... Exploring other wires and stones this could be completely jewelery awesome art. Pretty cool... Thanks for sharing it ;-)
<p>This is great! Thank you for all the time you spent both making this and detailing all the steps carefully, and with crystal clear instructions and pictures. I am trying to learn these techniques and you are one of my favorite teachers.</p>
<p>I can't thank you enough. I was losing momentum with my own wire work, and you have re-lit my fire. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!! for openly sharing your beauty-full work (understatement) and explaining your techniques. I could HUG YOU ...if you were here and not n my computer screen. LOL Blessings. _/\_</p>
The basic weaving techniques link is gone!! Can you please repost??
Oh, so sorry about that. I've removed it from this site. You can still find it on my blog though. http://gailavira.blogspot.com/p/free-tutorials.html
<p>Thank you so much for sharing this beautiful master piece. The wire work looks so elegant and I can't wait to try to make this.</p>
wow, awesome <br>someday i'll try to make it, and give it to my wife, :D
<p><a href="https://www.instructables.com/member/Gailavira/" rel="nofollow">Gailavira,</a></p><p>First I have to say your tutorial is amazing. Professionally done, clever macro photo shot and the spirit of your Will to let the reader understand your tutorial is unbeatable ! Thank you very much for your tutorial and I really appreciate it.</p><p>Attached is my work by following your tutorial. Using 20g and 26g wire and Sodalite ((3 x 4 cm). It took me 4 hours for the 'basket' + upper part yesterday, and 3 hours for the lower part today. I found it's very difficult to do the weaving as I'm not able to get a clean and neat weave.</p><p>Thank you VERY MUCH once again. I learned so much from you.</p><p>regards.</p>
<p>Beautiful!</p>
<p>Because of you, and in fact it's you are the one beautiful at heart and will. Thank you very much. </p>
Wonderful tutorial! ii have some experience with wire work, but it's been a while. This inspired me to pick it up again. thanks!
Any way you could post tutorials for some other designs plz??
I do have a few tutorials here already, and I will probably post more in the future. If you don't want to wait for me to post others here though, you can find some more free tutorials on my web-site. Http://tutorial.gailavira.com . Just scroll to the bottom of the page to find the freebies.
My first try took four hours and i messed up a few places had to fix then sort of. This is my first try doing anything with wire.. Any tips?
That's your first try? That's amazing! <br> <br>The best tip I can give you is to keep working at it. Try doing smaller pieces that have curves in them just to get a better feel for the wire and how it moves. That will help you get the curves smoother on future pieces.
Your work is beautiful and inspiring! Thank you !!! &lt;3 Love, Light, and Blessings to you!!
Thanks so much for sharing!
I'm still reading through this but I must say that you are an amazing instructor!
This is such a phenomenal instructable. You take something that looks absolutely mind-blowingly confusing and break it down into something that's completely understandable! Thank you for sharing your knowledge, and showing how some of these more complex wire-wraps break down!
How do you keep the free end of 28g wire from getting all tangled up while you're working with it?
I usually don't read jewelry instructables but as soon as I saw the picture I knew I had to see how to make this amazing pendant! <br>Great instructable
Gorgeous and amazing! :)
Congratulations! I just KNEW you would win, this is magnificent! :)
Impressive attention to detail in the instructable, and really amazing results. Thanks for sharing!
Congrats on being a finalist in the jewelry contest!
Great job here - I've never seen an Instructable with so many steps! I'm amazed and impressed and appreciate the time you put in here. I hope i can try to use these techniques sometime and make something beautiful!
THat was the most fun mouse scrolling i have done in a long time.
Incredible, beautiful and amazing! <br> <br>The love of your craft shows through your details. You should be very proud!!
WoW! All you'r tutorials are good, but this one's really out of this world! keep up the good work!;)
Wow. This is the longest 'ibble I've ever read. How long does it take you to make one of these things?!?
Wow, Donna, I couldn't believe it when I saw this tutorial of yours listed when I got my Instructables email!! I really suck at wirewrapping which is why I gave it up (other than wrapped loops and briolettes) and took up beadweaving which I <em>love</em> and am good at&nbsp;!<br> <br> But I'm going to give this a try. If I'm unsuccessful, it won't your fault because your instructions are excellent. I already know how clearly you explain things as I've previously downloaded your Basic Wire Weaving techniques. If I can't do it, it'll be me.<br> <br> Thanks for posting this on Instructables. You're a sweetie to do so!<br> And you forgot a happy childhood fun thing I used to love doing - rolling over and over down a hill with a friend. :-)
I'm sure you can do it!
I'll give it a good try, Donna - an honest effort, I promise. Right now, I've got a few beaded projects I'm working on (and I'm not a fast beader!) so will do it after I'm finished those. I want to thank you for all the free tutorials you offered and let you know just how beautiful and skillfully wrought your work is, even though I rarely post on JL. *If* I do a good job on making this, I'll post it for you to see.
nice tutorial with easy to understand step by step instructions...
roughly how many hours did it take you to make this? I have experience making chain mail belts and the like so I have an idea just how long those take.
It's been a few years since the first one I made, so I don't remember how long it took initially, but for the newer ones I've done, I've got it down to about 3-4 hours if I do all the swirls, 1 1/2 - 2 1/2 hours if I do less.
thats pretty good. making a chain mail belt out of aluminum wire 1.3mm thick took me over 100hours, felt much more like a chore than doing something fun. <br>most of the time is made making the loops and cutting them though.
WOW! I can't wait to get started! Thanks so much for sharing!
Can't wait to see what you make :)
I will try to remember to post it when I finish it. Unfortunately, it will be some time before I get started. I have too many irons in the fire and Procrastination is my arch nemesis. :D But I do want to do this, so I am putting it on my List. Thanks SO MUCH for sharing this fantastic Instructible. I am excited!
I just have to say how much I appreciate the quality of your tutorials. You really photograph all of the steps so well and you word and describe in such a way that it is so easy to imagine being able to do this! This is a skill unto itself, creating a good tutorial. I am sure you are aware that many instructions are mediocrely done. Thank you for your hard work! <br>mer.
the epitome of awsomeness!
Thanks :)
This is the longest ever instructable I have ever seen since I joined and I think its totally worth it. The pendant is just jaw dropping awesome. Thank you for sharing your awesomeness. What a great instructable.
Thank you for the compliment :)
I agree completely!
This is awesome!!! I can't believe you really wrote 118 steps!!!

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