loading

A good subtitle for this would be: How To Piss Off Your Loved Ones!

My wife is a good sport so when someone suggested that I seal my wife's credit card in resin, I jumped at the chance!

It is also a possibility that I had some fund doing it too. For the record, this credit card is long since expired, and in truth never even activated. This project is just for fun. The last thing I need is an angry wife...

Step 1: Obtaining the Credit Card

  • Locate your current credit card balance....
  • Lose it. This step might require some clean-up
  • Set out to steal your spouses credit card.
    • Use your ninja skills
    • Or rely on the fact she mostly ignores you anyway..
  • Locate said credit card. Tread carefully here. The contents of a woman's purse in not a place to rummage idly!

Step 2: 1st Resin Pour

So the resin I'm using is called EasyCast and it's pretty simple to work with. I found it at the craft store (Michael's) and they also have molds for sale. (and many other tempting accessories if I'm honest!)

Since I will not be doing anything to this project after casting I wanted a clear block centered in the mold. So I'm using an 8oz mold that will let the credit card sit dead center with about 1/2" of resin all around it.

In following the directions, mostly, I mixed up 2oz of resin and hardener and poured it into my mold. This will give me my 4oz of epoxy resin to form the base or bottom of the cast. Now we wait.

Step 3: 2nd Pour

It takes a bit to cure, but in several hours in had become rock hard.

The second pour is just like the first. 2oz of each bottle, resin and hardener. The only difference is to add your item.

A good tip here is to pour a small bit of resin first to make a bed for the thing you are casting. That will help to minimize the bubble caught underneath it.

Speaking of bubbles, they can ruin a casting. I hit this casting with my propane torch in order to pop the bubbles.

It is best to use the lowest setting possible, because too much heat can destroy a casting and burn the resin. A few quick passes and the bubbles were all but gone. It is a good idea to check on your casting once more, before cured (give it 20 mins or so). If there are any more bubbles pop them with heat before it sets.

Step 4: Testing It Out!

After a few more hours, the resin had hardened, and it was a solid block of epoxy that she'll never be able to slide through the machine! A few well placed whacks and your casting should come free easily from the mold! (at least mine did)

We took it into Target and tried to use. Major thanks to the Target clerk for being such a good sport. Poor guy, he was so confused....

<p>That's a genius (and funny) way to prevent a spouse or girlfriend from running up a massive head-wound credit card bill! lol ...Favorited this one. Thanks!</p>
<p>Unless they decide to chuck it at your head.</p>
<p>Hahaha! I could just see this saying on it &quot;In Case of Emergency Only&quot; LOL ;)</p>
<p> You have mean an wicked sense of humour, I wonder what your favourite pants would look like in one of these.</p>
<p>ok very good</p>
<p>I love your sense of humor! Awesome. lol</p>
<p>lol nice. This reminds me of a commercial years ago about saving money. A woman froze her credit card in a block of ice so she had to try and break it open to make an impulse purchase. </p>
<p>Nice idea :) Just make sure it's not a contactless payment (RFID) enabled card, otherwise ...spend spend spend :)</p>
<p>i LOVE the foto of you going into her purse to retrieve the card!! <strong>x^D .... </strong>ha-ha! ☺ she'll never trust you near her purse again. <strong>x^)</strong></p>
<p>oh .... looked @ funny foto before watching <strong>vid</strong> ~ TOO funny!</p>
<p>This would actually be a great idea for those who'd want to only use the card non-physically, actually. You can use it over the phone or the internet, just not anywhere that you'd have to slide it. I call that a smart idea.</p>
<p>She also said it was much easier to find in her purse! </p>
<p>so, SHE's as funny as <strong>you</strong>, then! <strong>x^)</strong></p>
<p>but i have 1 question!!! if emergency come's and you really need to use it ,, is there's a tutorial on how to remove the cast?</p>
<p>If you want to dissolve the epoxy using some kind of industrial solvent that will probably melt through your flesh if it gets on you, sure.</p>
<p>Will your next instructable be how to turn a sofa into a bed?</p>
<p>&quot;How to Sleep Comfortably in the Dog House&quot; LOL!</p>
<p>This would almost be &quot;not nice&quot; if it weren't so funny. And true.</p>
<p>Ha ha Priceless !</p><p>Thanks.</p>
<p>I love this!</p><p>A few years ago when my wife &amp; I were new homeowners and new parents, we froze our credit cards in blocks of ice and left them in the freezer. Still there for real emergencies, but definitely prohibitive for daily use...</p>
<p>Nice work, im just worries this would give my other half something good to throw at me lol</p>
Another tip for getting rid of bubbles in a casting with resin Is to set the cast atop a bed of very hot water. This will help bring bubbles to the surface if they are deep and you can't get them with a torch or lighter. :) thanks for the giggle idible. :)
<p>i came for some casting tips, left with that plus a LOL</p>
<p>I'm glad. I was worried this might have gotten a bit too goofy! </p>
<p>well it was just a bit of fun (that is kind of the point) but actually seeing how you did it with a few tips and tricks along that way is a great help to someone like me who hasn't done it before, and is thinking of giving it a go.</p>
<p>Ha, this is great! It's art in so many ways. :) Thanks!</p>
<p>thank you! </p>
Ha ha ha, it's great idea, I have to try as well. :))
<p>Sweet! Be sure to let me know if you try it! </p>
<p>Great vid, love it</p>
<p>thank you! </p>
<p>Can you clarify how you used the torch to get the bubbles out of the casting resin? Did you just pass the torch close to the surface to warm up the resin? I wouldn't think it would take much of an &quot;oops!&quot; to accidentally melt part of the mold. I am assuming there are no flammable fumes that come off the stuff while it is curing.</p>
<p>Totally. The torch seems to heat up the resin and make it more viscous. Thus allowing the bubbles to rise quickly to the surface. The other thing that helps is warming up the resin a bit before the pour (I think I mention that in the video) You just do quick passes and don't linger on one spot too long. </p><p><br>The trick is not to over do it. If you heat up the epoxy too much it will harden unevenly and you will ruin in the casting (don't ask me how I know that...)</p>
<p>Hahaha, brilliant :-)</p>
<p>thanks! </p>
<p>Remember the joke where the man said his wife's credit card had been stolen and when a friend asked why he hadn't canceled it and he said &quot;Because the thief is spending less than my wife.&quot;</p>
<p>haha nice one mate :)</p>
<p>Ha!! That's hilarious! The truth is, in my house, I'm the spend thrift! Luckily she hasn't tried to confiscate my card yet.... </p>
<p>You should have cast it with something blocking the numbers set in the resin. I wonder also if the chip cards would still work. I wave mine over the terminal at least an inch above and it still works.</p>
<p>I would guess that it's only 1/2 of resin all around the card. I think it would work okay! </p>
<p>I wonder if this will work if the CSV code on the back remains visible, you can still use it online.</p>
<p>All the numbers are plainly visible. If it had been an active card I think the Target guy would have had little trouble running it. </p>
<p>I wonder if this will work if the CSV code on the back remains visible, you can still use it online.</p>
<p>Fun instructable. But remember, she can still use online!</p>
<p>Lovely! I want to make my own vacuum tool like yours. Post an instructable!</p>
<p>A piston type 12 volt automotive tire pump works as a great vacuum pump. Just epoxy a small hose fitting (1/4 inch) to the pumps inlet and away you go. I pulled 20 inches of vacuum with a cheap and very old pump. I've used this to vacuum form fibreglass housings, to pump gas out of home made wine, and for bubble-less castings. </p>
When casting, it is possible to make a (relatively) inexpensive vacuum chamber with a 5 gallon bucket, a piece of lexan larger than the opening, a cheap (or rented from the auto parts store) a/c evacuator pump, and a through fitting in the lexan which matches the pump (obviously a hose to attach the pump amd the bucket). By pulling a vacuum on the bucket, with the mold inside, dissolved gas in the liquid tries to reach equilibrium with the gas it is in contact with (a vacuum) and the bubbles migrate to the surface (Henry's Law). If you add an additional fitting to the &quot;lid&quot; it can double as a catch can for vacuum bagging fiberglass and other composite projects (pockets of resin without fiber are brittle and add unnecessary weight).<br><br>This is slightly over simplified, but a quick and dirty way to up your molding and prototyping game.
<p>How about writing that up in an 'ible?</p>
I honestly think this is the best Instructable I have seen in a loooong time. Thanks for posting it!!
<p>thanks!!</p>

About This Instructable

46,217views

330favorites

License:

Bio: Come spend some time in the shop. I'm a hobbyist woodworker and professional computer geek in Northern California. I guess my projects will vary ... More »
More by kludge77:Epoxy Art: Painting With Resin!  Making the Yarn Frisbee Mosquito in Amber Prop Replica 
Add instructable to: