Instructables
Picture of Cheap & Easy Solar Shield
Do you live in a hot climate?  Does the sun beat down upon your home?  Do you wish you could reduce solar heating?  Do you want to block the sun before it gets inside your dwelling (blinds work only so well -- the heat is already inside at this point).  I answered yes to all of these, so I made a Solar Shield.  I'll show you how in this Instructable.

I made this about a year ago, and it still looks the same the day I installed it.  So it has some robustness.  The bad part is I forget some of the details.  (Sorry!  But you can figure it out pretty easily I think -- read on.)

I think the total cost was ~$30.

Step 1: Stuff You Need

I got a roll of this Solar Shield material at my home store.  This is the most expensive component (~$25).  When unrolled, it's about 4' wide and about 7' long.

(2) 8' lengths of flat molding.  (The corners are rounded a bit to take the edge away.)

Staple gun & 1/4" or 3/8" staples.

1-1/2" flat plate.  These might be called "repair" plates.  (I forget.)

(2) flat-head machine screws, #6 or #8,  length is ~3/4" (I forget this too.)

(4) nuts to match machine screws.  I used double-nuts.

(7) Self-tapping screws

(4) screws eyes (You'll have to judge the size based on how windy it is where you are.)

Step 2: Attach the Bottom Molding

Picture of Attach the Bottom Molding
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Cut the molding to length and staple the molding to the bottom side.  This will give the shield stiffness and keep it from flapping in the wind.

Step 3: Roll Over the Bottom Molding

Picture of Roll Over the Bottom Molding
Roll the bottom molding over twice and staple it again so the molding is completely concealed.

Step 4: Attach the Bottom Plates

Picture of Attach the Bottom Plates
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Drill a hole through the bottom molding and attach the two flat plates on the bottom.  I put mine at about 1/4 and 3/4 length.  Use a flat-head machine screw and 2 nuts at each location.  I added a couple drops of crazy glue (Loctite works too) on the nuts.
 
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Foxtrot702 years ago
Great Project!!! I can see this made into a series of roll-up shades attached to the underside of a house overhang. Coupled with using light gray or if available a white shingle on the roof and attic active attic ventilation, day time overheating of the house can be substantially reduced. Lowering A/C costs.
catlaw19972 years ago
Looks great! I used white outdoor blinds for my front porch. I like that yours don't block the view. Does that material let the air through? The blinds do. They cost about the same....$20 for a 9ft wide x 6ft, and $15 for a 6ft wide by 6ft blind. I just hung 10 cup hooks and they were up in about ten minutes.
bclamore (author)  catlaw19972 years ago
Blinds sounds great. Take a pic and make an Instructable! (You kinda already did in your message, but it's not searchable.) The real power of these Instructables comes from sharing ideas.

The screen can let air through, but probably not much. In my application air flow doesn't really matter: there's plenty of free space around it. I put my Shield in the optimum place determined by the path of the afternoon sun for the hot months of the year.