Introduction: Cheap Folding Project/router Table

Picture of Cheap Folding Project/router Table

What you'll need:

A cheap folding workbench (B&D Workmate or similar) - you can get them on sale at auto part stores for as low as $10. They are also comonly found in garage sales, on craigslist or even sitting in the street with a "free" sign on.

1/4 sheet (i.e. 2'x4') piece of MDF. Keep checking the scrap pile at your local home improvement store where they sell cuts with small defects at a steep discount - I paid $2 at most

A scrap of laminate flooring for the insert

scraps of wood to reinforce the table

(Optional) A router table fence

(Optional) A T-track kit

Step 1: Assemble the Table and Make the Insert Plate

Picture of Assemble the Table and Make the Insert Plate

Using the screws that came with your Workmate, attach the MDF to the legs.

Cut a piece of 8 mm laminate flooring large enough for the router to go through once it is attached to the plate, keeping in mind that the opening in the table is smaller than the plate's dimensions.

Trace the outline of the plate on the table.

Make a second, smaller trace perimeter for the hole.

Drill a large (~1 cm or 1/2 ") hole inside the smaller perimeter, close to its edge.

Starting at the hole, cut out the inner perimeter with a jigsaw

Using a straight router bit, practice on scraps to get the bit to the exact thickness of the laminate flooring you have.

Using clamped down "fences", hollow out the four straight lines of the outer perimeter, to the requisite depth. Finish the perimeter with the router free-hand (i.e. without a fence).

As long your perimeter is clean, there is no need for a fence to clean out any remaining extra material inside the hole.

Step 2: Reinforce the Table

Picture of Reinforce the Table

Use screws and glue to attach some sturdy planks to the underside of the table to make it sturdier.

Step 3: Install a Router Fence

Picture of Install a Router Fence

Fences can be very expensive; sometimes, however, they are made to fit a specific router table and when that model is discontinued, you may score a great router fence at clearance prices. If you get one, I recommend getting a T-track kit from Rockler for installation.

Step 4: Why It's Awesome

Picture of Why It's Awesome

1. Cheap

2. Takes very little space

3. Large and convenient router table.

4. Light to drag outside to on a nice day, yet sturdy enough (with ad-hoc ballast as in this picture) for just about everything - sawing, table- and above-table routing, sanding finishing, assembly/dis-assembly, etc.

5. Parts from the store-bought folding workbench you did not use (HDF planks and pegs) will serve to repair your workbench (if you bought two in he beginning and converted one of them to a router table).

Comments

Meglymoo87 (author)2016-05-19

Great job :)

Joker972 (author)2016-05-18

Awesome instructable and inspiration! Funny you mention buying 2, and one of them won't clamp more than about 10 lbs without pushing the bolt thru the frame anyway. Think I'll see if I can make a dual (circular/jigsaw) table saw/rotary tool router table, as I have no actual router or table saw. If it works I'll post it soon!

:o)

Stan1y (author)2016-05-15

I've a work mate salvaged from a skip a few years ago I was thinking I might replace the top but it may get used as the stand for one of these instead

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