I enjoy putting together puzzles and hanging them up for home decoration.  You have a few options when it comes to displaying a finished puzzle.  The cheapest way is to just stick it in a frame that holds it tight, but not glued together.  With this option you might save money, but if it falls off the wall you run the risk of the puzzle falling apart and needing put together again.  You can buy one of those bottles of powder and mix it up, but those little bottles can get expensive.  There is always the most expensive way, taking a finished puzzle to a frame shop and let them glue it and frame it.

I am cheap, so i spent some time looking for a way to save my puzzles.  The cheapest way I have come up with is to use simple Elmers glue.  The same glue every kid uses in school.  

- easy to get
- cheap
- non toxic
- no bad odors
- fast drying
- easy to work with

- leaves the puzzle with a matte finish

Now I will show you how use it.......

Step 1:

Items needed

- Puzzle
- Plastic
- Elmers Glue
- Something to spread the glue
- A knife 

The first thing I do is prepare an area to work on the puzzle.  I first tape a large piece of plastic down to a table, I used a cheap garbage bag.  

now assemble your puzzle.  
<p>If you brush the glue on with a cheap foam brush it won't drip and puddle and you can glue the back. I use Mod Podge for a strong. bright, clear gloss finish.</p>
<p>I've used duct tape and contact paper to hold puzzles together and it works really well, but they will be flexible so you may want to attach them to plywood/foam with spray adhesive, or frame them. Shirley you could try that or maybe Amazing Goop all purpose adhesive to glue it to something. </p>
<p>I need a suggestion to preserve a plastic jigsaw puzzle. Its semi transparent plastic. The surface is shining glossy image. I can seal from the back once its finished. But with what? Water base glue will not hold plastic well. I have mod podge but it will peel right off plastic.</p>
<p>I use mod podge gloss craft glue, it dries on clear and has a shiny finish, lasts longer than school glue</p>
<p>If you build the puzzle on a piece of foam board, you can lay another piece of foam board on top when its done. Clamp them together to flip it over. Then glue the back instead of the front. This way you won't have that ugly mat finish.</p>
<p>but you risk having the front of the puzzle sticking to the foam board and pulling the picture from the puzzle off. i dont know if i recommend this. you should try the clear glue and see how that dries.</p>
Has anyone tried using duct tape on the back to hold it together and give is support?
<p>You can glue it to single layer cardboard for stability. I've put them in poster frames with no glue with great success too as they come in sizes about the same as most puzzles. </p>
I was wondering whether glueing the puzzle in this way would make it possible to disassemble and build it again, or not at all? I'm trying to figure out a way to frame a few puzzles without mounting them permanently.
If you use this method then it is permanent, thats the reason for using glue. If you want to take them apart later my suggestion would be to buy a good frame that fits together very well so that the puzzle can not come apart in the frame, but you would be able to take it out of the frame and disassemble it.
Thanks, I had the same idea in mind with a tight-fitting frame if the glue couldn't work. I'm thinking of using frame clips and acrylic/glass to keep it as cheap as possible, not sure if it'll be tight enough though. If it works I'll try to post an Instructable on it :) I've got Van Gogh's &quot;Nuit Etoile&eacute;&quot; (1 000 pc) and Salvador Dali's &quot;Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee Around a Pomegranate a Second Before Awakening&quot; (1 500 pc) with which I've started my collection of fine art puzzles, and I'm sure they'll look beautiful framed! But it'll take a while for me to build them too...
This guy should have read instructables ... <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22348655" rel="nofollow">40,000 piece jigsaw collapse</a>
I don't know if i would have the heart to start over on that. why was it sitting up?! it should have been on a flat table! my limit is about 1500 pieces.
Lack of space (19ft by 8ft !!) ? Also &quot;photo opportunity&quot; is easier if it's up. They'd apparently taken advice on the maximum angle that was safe, and ... it wasn't. <br> <br>The guy actually MADE the jigsaw too, not just assembled it. Re-assembling it was probably going to be a job for the Queen :)
would it be better to apply the glue to the back of the puzzle so that if you have an globs or mishaps they are not visible over the artwork? <br>
the problem when doing that is when the glue runs down between the pieces it pools under the puzzle and on top the plastic. if you did it from the back it would have those pools at the front of the image. <br> <br>now if you wanted to take the time i suppose that you could do a few lite coats on the back to seal between the pieces without it running between them. then do a heavier coat to finish it. <br> <br>my preference is to do one coat on the front and not worry about what runs between the pieces to the other side. I will add a pic from the back side. <br> <br>try it your way and let us know what happens.
oh dog-gone-it. now i have to go out an buy a new puzzle. of course I am pretty good at puzzles. The last one I did said 2+ years on the front of the box, and I finished that one in just over 6 months. :)
I go to 2nd hand stores like Goodwill to find puzzles. you run the risk of have a missing piece, but its cheaper. Garage sales are good places to find them also. I am cheap, I don't like spending over $2 for a puzzle thats used. For me to buy a new puzzle it has to be something i really like.
If you then flip it over &amp; glue a piece of newspaper to the back it will be super strong...&amp; still cheap !
I did not think of that.

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Bio: I have been an industrial electrician for almost 10 years. This is why many of my projects are electrical related. I am working on a ... More »
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