Cheesy Potato Fries

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Introduction: Cheesy Potato Fries

About: Hey, I'm Muhaimina! A crazy craft addict! Obsessed with swirls and polka dots... Love green craft and rustic home decors... and Instructables is pretty much my second home!

Who doesn't love french fries, potato fries or any kind of fried potatoes! I'm not a good cook but I enjoy trying different recipes for potato fries and they always taste good (no matter what the recipe is!). I've posted an ible of spicy potato fries, and this time I tried mixing a little cheese with the potatoes. They taste delicious!  

Lets' start :D

Step 1: Ingredients

To make the cheesy potato fries you'll need:

1) 3 medium size potatoes,
2) Half cup flour,
3) Salt (for taste),
4) Dairy cheese (as much as you want),
5) Grater,
6) Unused oil for frying (I used soybean oil).

Step 2: Cutting the Potatoes

Peal and cut the potatoes as it is usually done for french fries. It's nice to keep the sliced potatoes long and thin, so cut the potatoes horizontally.
Keep the sliced potatoes on a bowl or pot filled with water while you prepare the other ingredients.

Step 3: Making the Paste

Take a bowl, add half cup of flour and enough water to make the paste. Also add a bit of salt (1/4 tbsp or as much as you want).
Now, grate the cheese and mix it well with the paste (as much as you want).
Then, add the sliced potatoes to the paste and mix them well.

Step 4: Frying and Serving

Take a medium pan or pot and add enough oil to fry the potatoes.
Heat oil over medium heat.
Once the oil is heated, add the pasted potatoes to the pan.
Don't stir frequently while frying, and after 5 -8 minutes turn the potatoes around to make sure they're fried evenly on all sides.
It'll take 8-10 minutes after that and don't let the fries turn brownish. Use a slotted spoon to take the fries out of the oil and place them on a napkin to soak the oil. After frying the potatoes you can sprinkle more grated cheese on them if you want to. Serve them with cola and tomato ketchup!
They're delicious! 

Enjoy!

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    50 Comments

    i surely will try making this recipe ?

    I made these the other day and they taste soooo good

    1 reply

    Thanks for following my recipe! glad you like it :)

    These Look delicious.. I probably might add a bit of Oregano, and Chilly Flakes to it, in the Batter mode, and then coat the strips, and then Fry.. Might add a zing to it..

    2 replies

    Thanks! your recipe sounds great as well! thanks for sharing :)

    Made me hungry!
    I don't eat French fries or chips very often but when I do they've got to be cooked in beef dripping or lard, same as pancakes though with pancakes just a wiping of the hot pan is enough lard.
    You just don't get the flavour with oils that you do with lard and as I say I don't eat chips, - French fries in the U.S.A but not quite chips.
    Good recipe though.

    OK, I realize you come from somewhere but you say '1/4 tbs salt." You have got to use American cooking conventions here. Teaspoon is "tsp." Tablespoon is "tbsp" I think. We don't usually divide tablespoons into quarters; 1/3 of a tablespoon = 1 tsp.

    8 replies

    Er no we dont have to use American "cooking conventions" or standards for anything in here. The majority of the world uses milligrams, grams, kilograms and tonnes, millimetres, centimetres, metres and kilometres. Some may choose to add other units as a courtesy to save you having to convert. Any abbreviation for teaspoons or whatever that are acceptable and understandable are fine to use. As for the number of teaspoons in a tablespoon it depends on where you are which is why we tend to measure in millilitres here. In America and Canada: 3 (5 ml) teaspoons = 1 tablespoon (15 ml). In Australia and the UK: 4 (5 ml) teaspoons = 1 tablespoon (20ml).

    Extremely sorry! I meant tablespoon. you need to add a bit of salt just for taste, so I used 1/4 tbs (but missed the 'p' and it was a silly typing mistake!).

    OK, and how did you measure a quarter of a tbsp? I can't do it.

    If you can't measure a 1/4 tbsp then simply add a small amount of salt. 'salt for taste' means adding a small amount of salt to reduce bitter flavors and make other flavors pop, it definitely doesn't mean that we're looking for a salty flavor.

    Well, you don't *have* to use American measurements here (after all, you understood exactly what she meant :).

    Also, while we're talking "to taste" and I can't imagine it's critical here (as it might be for something like heavier spices or baking powder), 1/4 isn't the same as 1/3. If a recipe in an American cookbook actually needs 1/4 tbs, then that is the way they'll write it.

    (And, per Wikipedia, "it is abbreviated as T, tb, tbs, tbsp, tblsp, or tblspn", so as long as it's either a cap or you get the "b" in there, you're pretty much cool. :)

    No: we seem to understand this differently! I THINK she means teaspoon. And we do not divide tablespoons into fractions, never seen such measures. And can't salt to taste this early in the recipe.

    (oh, and I have seen 1/4 or 1/2 *T* listed, but only when a very precise amount is needed and rounding to the nearest teaspoon won't work.)

    Ah, yeah, that would make a difference.

    1/4 teasp is an *awfully* small amount, though, especially for potatoes. (And I was going with the "to taste" from the ingredient list, you're right about the steps.)

    You don't identify the potatoes used but debate is furious over Yukon Gold vs. other varieties. Main thing is, you're not using red potatoes.