Introduction: Clone Your Favorite Plants

Last summer I was at my uncles house roaming his garden. He usually loves to let me pick out plants to bring back and add to my garden. I came across this really neat plant he had but he only had one. I couldn't dare ask him for it, or try to split it.

I mentioned to him how much I loved the plant and how I need to find one for myself. He said, "I can give you a cutting!"

I thought, "What the heck am I going to do with a cutting?"

Little did I know, that is how you can clone a plant!

-

In the following steps I will show you an easy way to clone your favorite plants!

-

Fun Fact: All apple seeds produce a new, unique plant. This means that every "Haralson" apple comes from one tree, or at least a cutting from that single original tree! Neat huh?

Step 1: Tools & Materials

Water

Root Hormone (Liquid or Powder)

Potting Soil

-

3-4" Pots (I use Solo cups)

Pruning Knife

Step 2: Pick Your Plant!

Pick the plant you want to clone.

-

Here I am going to clone a Black Eyed Susan.

Step 3: Pick a Stem

  • Your cutting should have at least a couple branches sticking off of it.
  • Try to get a newer "baby" branch. This branch has a better chance of being in a rooting mode.
  • Cut branch at 45 degree angle.

Step 4: Water Dip

  • Dip the cut end into a glass of water.

Step 5: Root Hormone

  • Stick the wet end into the root hormone
  • Tap on side of dish to knock off excess powder.

Step 6: In the Dirt

  • Fill your pot with loose dirt
  • Stick the cutting into the dirt 2 inches.
  • Tamp around the cutting so the cutting has good soil contact and stays upright.

Step 7: Grow!

You now have a clone of your favorite plant!

  • Maintain a damp soil moisture
  • Keep in partial shade and gradually increase sunlight
  • Increase pot size after 4 weeks or transplant.

Repeat with as many cutting as you like!

-

Note: Your transplant may wilt a little bit the first day. It will snap back, its a traumatic experience!

The great thing about this method compared to splitting is that you won't even notice a different in the host plant. It is only a traumatic experience for once branch. If it dies in the process, no biggie, just cut another!

Comments

author
LucasN21 (author)2016-08-18

Does this work for any plant?

author
parisusa (author)2016-08-15

Getting plants from friends & family is the best! This is a great way to do it.