Clothesline Hangers for Windy Conditions

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Introduction: Clothesline Hangers for Windy Conditions

Using a clothesline is easier than people think, and saves 100% of the substantial energy used in a dryer. In my previous instructable on this topic, I explained how using plastic hangers can make using a clothesline as easy as using a dryer. But at least one reader had trouble with hangers blowing off the line. I haven't had that problem, but for those of you that do here's a simple solution.

The simplest and cheapest is to use a rubber band, but I had trouble with the rubber bands breaking. The best solution I found (after experimenting with the options shown in the picture) turned out to be adding a tighter hook that grabs on the clothesline.

Step 1: Materials

1) Plastic hanger (metal hangers rust and stain clothes).
2) 19 gauge or heavier stainless steel wire. Lower gauge numbers are heavier wire. It should be stainless, again so it won't rust and stain clothes.

Step 2: Bend the Wire

Bend the wire as shown below. The part on the right helps keep it from flopping around. It's easiest to start in the center of the wire, make the hook part, and then attach it to the hanger.

Step 3: Use It!

When you hang it on the line, use the new tight hook. Adjust the tightness as needed.

Step 4: Another Option

Here's another kind I tried, but it's not as good. It allows the hanger to move around, even though it won't fall off. And even though it's designed not to look on a closet rod, sometimes it bends wrong and does hook on when it shouldn't.

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19 Comments

Excellent. Would use this, but around here it gets so windy the chothes blow off the hanger. LOL

We have used plastic clips with holes in them for decades, now down to the last two, and shops don't sell them. But I just found them online:
http://www.maidofshade.com.au/holey_peg.htm

Coat_Hanger_Peg-2.jpg

I use a dedicated clothesline with tight loops tied into it for shirts hung on hangers, which is similar to these clips. It works pretty well, though not when we get a serious blow. (I live on a sometimes very windy high desert plain). The wire hooks look like they would probably work better.

What about a clothespin on each side of the plastic hanger? Seems you could tighten it by sliding them in close enough to hold them securely. Should stabalize them from swinging around and getting thrown off too...

Looks like a good idea.

Works better than what I do, using clothespins to hold the hangers on the line during windy days, as sometimes the clothespins pop off the plastic hangers and don't do any good.However it won't help me much.

My problem is that I'm a large man and they don't sell hangers wide enough to fit the shoulders of my shirts. If there is any wind this often causes the shirt to slide to one side and right off the hanger (occasionally I'll even have this problem in my closet).

On windy days I'm usually forced to just clothespin my clothes directly to the line.

Brilliant! but it looks like too much work. For shirts I started using two hangers, in opposing directions. Then I drop out the extra one when I take them inside. Also I try to hang in the late afternoon when the wind usually dies off.

clotheshanger1.jpg

With the number of spare hangers I have lying around (when one moves around a lot and a dozen plastic hangers tend to cost a buck or less, they eventually accumulate), this will probably be the option I go with. Thank you.

fantastic!