Instructables
Hello!
First I will show you the long-ish ground forge, what i used, how I put it together and lit it, then how I made the sword blade (note not full tang) and handle ect.
 
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Step 1: Materials

!!Important lots of heat and fumes given off so out side is a must for this type of forge, when the worked mettle is taken out it will be red-white hot, you will feel the heat from a distance so don’t let it get any where near your or any ones skin or body or it will hurt, a lot!!

Materials

The materials needed for constructing a non-permanent forge depends on the size and shape, this forge was made for the job of forging the blade of my sword, so I will list the materials as if u was replicating this exactly (or kind of).


Forge:
•Building bricks with 2-3 holes, x8
•Solid building bricks (sand stone bricks not as good due to the heat) aprox x40
•Roofing tiles x5
•Breeze block x1
•Slabs x2-3 (depending on size of slabs)
•Hair dryer x2 (similar powers)
•Soft clay about 1kg


Sword (if making)
•Steel to work, suggest part of a small car leaf spring because of the high carbon factor and easy to work size another easy option is a car coil spring cut up. But for testing any steel can be used, a good thing to play with is reinforcing rods as you can make tongs for later use with the forge
•Length of reinforcing rod or other steel rod, 1.5-2 cm diameter and about 23 cm long.
•Steel plate about 4cm x8cm for hand guard, can use a section of leaf spring as I did.
•Wood for handle, 26cm x20cm and 1.5cm in thickness, suggest a hard wood because it makes turning a smooth finish easier.
•Bolt aprox 2.5-4cm brass or steel depending on preference.
•Washer, fancy as it will be on the hilt or but plane is fine.

Tools needed

Forge
•Making the forge
oHammer
oBrick chisel

•Working the forge
oBucket of water incase something happens (note tern off power to the hear dryers first, sounds silly but funny things happen when you panic).
oWater but for quenching, if you need to make hard brittle items.
oHeat proof gloves that reach up the arm.
oTongs, I found mole grips very useful but longer reach tongs may be found safer for retrieving smaller items from the forge.
oA solid lump of flat cast steel or iron. I used the back part pf a vice sat on a wall, this is far from ideal (just look at picture..).
oSelection of hammers with different heads and weights, tack up to club.

Sword

•Bench vice, on a bench this time.
•Lathe for turning handle, not a must but quicker than trying to plan it.
•Rounded chisel.
•Angel grinder for first sharpening and fine tuning.
•Bench water-stone, not a must but gives a better edge.
•Drill with sander attachment and a buffer attachment.
•Hacksaw .
•Tap and die set.
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how do you temper the blade?

AWESOME! Makes my sword look like a machete! I guess mine is more of a machete.
thebomb7454 years ago
can i use aluminum instead of steel... i have a small fire pit and idont think it can get that hot
you could although not the best idea. because steel is both stronger and easier to work with if broken. aluminum dosent break but shatters.
An Villain3 years ago
Listen to these guys, they are all correct, (though each favor different methods,) I agree with Bisquick on this, though my method of choice is better suited for swords of English design, as I've always found swords of Japanese design to be very weak unless forged by a master. While it appears you have used a combination of forging and stock removal to make this edged piece of metal, you first (from what I can gather from this Instructable,) cut it to general shape and then heated it and appeared to draw it out into its semi-final shape before grinding off the excess and edging it. This will give you what you would call an "edge", because that is what it is, you may not know it, but this edge (unless you REALLY lucked out) will either snap with a light (by true sword standards) blow or hold an edge for about 2 connecting slashes on a soft surface (fruit, cardboard, etc.) The proper method (for most straight double edged swords,) consists of either folding the steel (assuming it is already refined) into a billet (if different metals are to be used for the core and edge, then they are to be combined into a "sandwich" during the forming of the billet.) After the billet is formed then it is heated above Recrystallization temperature before being drawn out into the general shape of the blade (including the grind, tang, and if integral, the hilt.) After the forging of the blade, the blade is quenched, which prevents low temperature phase changes, as well as giving the metal the ability to hold an edge, with the trade off of making the metal very brittle (Water will give a harder sword with the small chance of distortion or microfissures, while oil will give a softer, more flexible blade, though the oils often tend to oxidize and form a sludge, lowering cooling efficiency even further.) After Quenching the sword is VERY hard but VERY brittle, causing it to snap if struck against something that will not give (rock, tree, ground, somebody else's sword,) this is why a sword is annealed afterwards, annealing involves reheating the metal above its recrystallization temperature again but this time allowing it to cool in the air until the smith decides to quench it, the earlier it is quenched, the harder and more brittle it will be, this is how it will always be with metal, what you gain in hardness (and therefore edge durability,) you lose in flexibility (and therefore the metal's resistance to breaking under stress.) After annealing comes the process of finishing the sword, this involves giving it a grip, pommel (if the design incorporated it,) finishing the hilt (also only if the design required it,) and polishing the blade. To polish the blade you will go over it with progressively finer grains of sandpaper until the desired finish is achieved, while you can go all the way down to a mirror finish if you desire, it is not recommended if you want to use your sword for anything other than a wall hanging as the finish will quickly dull and become scratched and it will be very "noticeable" shall we say if you ever get into a real combat situation (highly improbable but just in case.) After the blade is finished it must be sharpened, sharpening is done by grinding away material from where the edge is going to be, using a material that is harder than the surface being sharpened. This is usually followed by processes to polish the sharp surface to increase smoothness and to correct small mechanical deformations without regrinding. This is the accepted method for forging a sword from start to finish, it takes time to master and your first few "projects" most likely will not result in a perfect blade, but if you persevere, in time your efforts will be rewarded. Hope this helps.
If you are quenching the metal, can you use liquid nitrogen, or maybe dry ice in 90% alcohol to quench it faster, or do you not want it quenched that fast?
The faster the metal is quenched, the harder it will be, but the chance of distortion and microfissures increases exponentially the faster the metal is cooled.
So you would probably be better off quenching it in water, then quickly moving to one of the colder things?
The quenching medium is what ensures the evenness of the temper (the more efficient the quenching medium the less even the temper will be and vice-versa.) The hardness is determined by how long the metal is left out before quenching. Transferring quenching mediums is generally not a good idea as the metal often turns out with a variety of different properties (E.G. hard and brittle in one spot [metallic crystal structure is linear dendritic,] soft and flexible in another [metallic crystal structure is uniform/laminar,] or both very soft and very brittle [metallic crystal structure is amorphous AKA "metallic glass.")
Ok. Thanks for answering my questions. Was gonna try and make a forge this summer like this and make a couple things.
You're welcome, have fun!
alienman3 years ago
It is a good first try but there are a lot of improvements that could be made. The first improvement I would suggest is starting off with a lower carbon steel so you can get used to the folding process. Higher carbon steels tend to crack, especially if you are new to forging. The second suggestion i have is to quench it in oil. Oil does not transfer heat as quickly as water does and reduces the chance of your blade cracking. There are multiple steps to the quenching process that will allow you to create a better sword. Also full tang is the safe and professional way to make a sword and I fully suggest it. Good luck with your forging adventure!
Neovenetar4 years ago
isn't that more of a wakazashi (shortsword)? than a katana (sword)
The katana is also made very differently than he made his sword. You can't just call any thin curved sword a katana :P
true, but this sword was designed top imitate a katana. and also the word katana literally means sword, so any sword could be called a such ( though that would just be a stupid idea :P )
Applejacks6 years ago
Dude sweet instructable I tried to make a forge a few years ago out of air duct pipe stuff and mattress pumps for bellows; BAD IDEA!!! I was trying to heat some rerod to make a knife but the pipe melted before it got hot enough lol. I liked your use of hair dryers too. Some advice DONT WASTE YOUR FREAKIN TIME WITH A FORGE IF YOUR JUST GONNA WELD ON A TANG!!!! The tang is like the most important part of the sword!

And a word to all you *BLASPHEMERS*: The katana is VASTLY superior to any other sword they make!! So there.

Just needed to get that off my chest =)
Actually, the steel used in traditional Katana is regularly very poor(and in short supply), which required the traditional bladesmiths to work their very hardest to produce quality weapons made from less than quality materials. There is no "ultimate weapon" because if there was, then that country would have decimated any other. Katana, in particular, are not very effective against heavy armor, due to their thin width and thickness, which makes them less inclined to cause damage to the opposing metal.
actually nukes are ultimate weapons and we have been on the brink of nuclear war a few times. however we try to avoid their use. they are used for intimidation.
acutally, the ultimate weapon is CHUCK NORRIS!
he can dismantle a nuclear weapon,
resist every poison,
resist to a blender
HE IS THE ULTIMATE WEAPON!

unfortunatly, they tried to produce him in series, but it didn
Actually the ultimate weapon would be VX nerve agent. Odorless, tasteless, and is hard to see in it's vapor form. One drop of VX can easily kill hundreds. Any contact to the skin in it's liquid form makes you a dead man unless you happen to have an antidote for it which can only be found in certain military branches and The CDC. Nukes you can see coming and intercepted. VX can be stealthy poured into a water supply or sprayed crop duster style almost anywhere in the world.
The ultimate weapon is a match.
A match?
K
There are missiles that they can use to shoot down a nuke in midair. They already did it to a satellite falling in a similar trajectory to prove it could be done. That doesn't count the use of EMP weapons to render the detonator inactive, or the countless things they have stockpiled away just in case they need to stave off a nuke. Nothing is unbeatable, mate.
Snake beats EVERYTHING!!
For some reason the instructables robot gave me an email saying this was a comment to me, wierd .........
imrobot Kasaron5 years ago
there's still fall out, nuclear winters, and the fact that EMPs are very rudimentary at the moment. nobody uses nukes because the potential devastation to the rest of the world
mirrors man the ultimate weapon milloions of uses : blades, focusing arrays, laser re direction devices
Kasaron imrobot5 years ago
Rudimentary doesn't mean ineffective; an EMP warhead could be used to disable the electrical circuitry of an ICBM before it even breaks atmo, routing almost all fallout. Besides, if it's shot down fast enough, it'll send fallout over the home country of anyone silly enough to fire the blasted thing.
I understand, I was just stating on their untold power. But still you're right, they can be shot down. :-)
It really depends on what number sword you mean. A number 5 sword is superior to a number 3 katana. When I mena number, a long time ago, the number was determined by how many people it could cut through before getting "stuck."
Kind of late, but i just imagined the sixth guy in front of that Broadsword- "Ahhhh!!!!" *sword sticks*
 :D 

lol...
katana owns english broadsword
scottish claymore owns kantana
depends whose the beter swordsman....perhaps we can get together sometime? to compare swords? FOR FUN? >:)
spear owns all
distance
d-(_)z
 actually, a crossbow gets better distance. :)
I actually like a metal baseball bat, or it's medieval equivalent the mace. It's good for hitting things and you don't have to worry about cutting yourself. Or my fists...
I had an idea to make a Macuahuitl using utility knife blades instead of obsidian
125px-Macahuitl.pngalvinretract_blades.jpg
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