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This is an Instructable on how to create a very basic hammock stand that is sturdy as well as collapsable. I built this to go with my Grass Hammock that I just finished building. This project didn't take very much time and was fairly easy to accomplish.

Time: Took me a few hours, mostly because I tried something new that didn't work but I will cover that at the end. I finished the project in 2 afternoons including the hammock.

Cost: Material dependent, I used more hardware than I probably needed which raised the cost by a bit.

Hardware:

8" Hinge X2: $15.18

10" Hinge: $11.49

5/16 X 2" Hex lag screw X8: $3.68

1/4 X 2" Hex lag screw X16: $5.76

Carrigae bolt 1/2 X 8" X4 : $21.32

Carriage bolt 1/2 X 7" X2 : $4.30

Washers 1/2" X6 : $1.56

Hex Nut 1/2" X4: $1.00

Hardware Total: $64.29

Wood:

2X4 8' :$4.64

2X4 12' : $4.95

4X4 7' : $8.99

4X4 8' : $10.98

cutting cost : $1.50

Wood Total: 31.06

Options:

Hasp Hinges X2 : 15.38

Wood screws: $4.50

Grand Total: $95.35

You could maybe get away with different hardware and do away with all of the hinges. Not sure why the carriage bolts were so much more for the 8" either but anyways. I had to buy some wood bits as well. I had the guys at RONA cut the pieces to length for me to make it fit in my car and save me some effort. The 4x4's were all cut in half along with the 2*4 8'. The 12' 2x4 was cut into 4 pieces.

Skills needed: Basic wood working

Tools:

Skil saw

Drill

Drill , Auger, and Spade bits

Hammer

Ratchet set

Clamps

Step 1: Putting It All Together

I started by attaching the 2 4 Ft. lengths together with the 10" Hinge and 5/16" lag bolts .

Then placed 2 of the 4 ft 2X4's next to the hinge and moved it away from the hinge to allow it to rotate later. I then drilled into the center of the 2X4 and then into the 4X4 and then attached them with carriage bolts, round side down. You might have to hammer the bolt in it's a tight fit.

I then flipped it over and then rotated the 2x4 to make a base.

I then attached the other 4x4's to the end of the base with the remaining 2 hinges and 1/4" lag bolts.

Once I had the 4X4's attached I used the Hasp hinges on the end to hold them in place. This step is optional but makes setup much easier in my opinion.

I then clamped the remaining 4 2X4's together and drilled through them with the 1/2' auger bit and then the 5/8 spade bit later. I made the hole bigger to make setup easier later. I put holes on each size of the board. I then attached the 2X4's to the upright and base 4X4's temporarily with clamps when they were in a position I thought was strong enough and also low enough to not hit the bottom of the hammock. I then drilled through the 4X4's with the auger and then the spade bit again. You should try to drill as straight as possible but there is lots of flexibility in the hinges and using the bigger holes.

Once you finished drilling all the holes in your 4X4's put the remaining carriage bolts through the holes. Then attach with the washer and nut. Finger tightness is good enough.

Step 2: Finishing Up

I cut some reliefs into the backs of the upright 4X4's. This gives the hammock somewhere to put the straps from the hammock. I cut them with the Skil saw with one straight cut and one at 45 degrees. I also cut a relief into the poles so that when folded it fits tighter over the bolts sticking out from the bottom base. I could have cut back the bolts but this helps keep it folded nice and tight.

Step 3: Setting It Up

Start by unfolding to the flat position.

Extend the stabilizing legs.

Extend poles and secure with hasp hinges(if installed).

Attach support braces with the carriage bolts and secure with nuts and washers.

Attach hammock and relax with a refreshing beverage!

Step 4: Bloopers

I had tried to attach the upright poles with saddle posts. I had drilled a hole big enough to slide the rebar into. I then tried to attach that to the bottom base with bolts. Good idea in theory but the only problem was when you actually put weight on it it bent the bracket and drooped till I was sitting on the floor.

<p>It would be cool if you included a video of you putting it up and taking it down.</p>
<p>Yeah I can try it just got warm enough for me to start using it finally in canada. I'm not gonna lie though It's a heavy beast but setup is fairly simple.</p>
Nice project idea :-)<br><br>Two thoughts<br>1)Use treated wood, the green colored stuff. Looks like your 4x4 are, but not the 2x4<br>2)stain wood and seal with Polyurithane... It'll make it last longer and look much more &quot;professional&quot; :-)
I couldn't agree more. I don't know why there wasn't a pressure treated 2x4 option at the hardware store. I kinda rushed this project I made it as an afterthought to the hammock so I might stain the wood later. I also would like to countersink the carriage bolts more as well.

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