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Planning to do a lot of Protesting? Want something Re-useable for your Rally? This sign uses blackboard (also known as chalkboard) fabric to make a sign you can write on over and over again! And to make it easily transportable it folds down into a little bundle so you can take it with you everywhere (or to Washington DC...).

Many Thanks to my awesome sis who designed and made this version, I'm working on a version that doesn't use wood (since some cities don't allow wood for protest signs) and I'll post that asap.

Materials:

Blackboard fabric from Jo-ann.($5.99/yd)

http://www.joann.com/blackboard-fabric/1922145.ht...

Pine lattice 1-1/8” wide x ¼” thick (found in trim aisle) (.79/ft) for wood supports

Similar to: http://www.homedepot.com/p/1-1-2-in-x-1-4-in-x-6-...

8-32 Wing Nuts

http://www.homedepot.com/p/The-Hillman-Group-8-32-...

8-32x1” Machine Screw

http://www.homedepot.com/p/The-Hillman-Group-8-32-...

Velcro

http://www.homedepot.com/p/VELCRO-Brand-5-ft-x-3-4...

To write on chalkboard fabric:

Using regular chalk - you need to prime the fabric by completely coating with regular chalk then wiping with a soft dry cloth. Repeat twice. Then the chalk will write on the fabric.

With Chalk markers (found at the craft store http://www.chalkink.com/) - just write and let dry. Wipes off with wet wipes.

Step 1: Cut Your Materials

1. Cut your fabric panel to desired size. A regular piece of copier paper is about 8.5 X 11 inches so you probably want something at least 12 inches by 12 inches up to about 20 inches or so. Anything else becomes hard to maneuver. I recommend a shorter width and longer length for this sign construction.

2. Cut two pieces of wood lattice to the width of your fabric panel (I used a hand saw).

3. Cut one piece of wood lattice to the length of your fabric panel.

4. Cut a last piece of wood lattice to a comfortable length for a handle. This will be attached to the long piece. (Remember that your arm will get tired if you are holding it up for hours).

Step 2: Drill Holes in Your Wood Supports

1. Lay the wood supports along the edges of the fabric. You want the fabric to overlap the full width of the wood support.

2. Drill a hole in end of each end of the long piece (length), one hole at the end of each width piece, and one hole at the end of the handle piece. Make sure the hole goes through the fabric too.

Step 3: Add Velcro to Your Supports and Fabric

1. Attach Velcro to the backside of the fabric panel at the corners and also in the middle of each edge. (I used glue for extra adhesion.)

2. Attach Velcro at the complementary spot on each wood support piece.

Step 4: Assemble Your Sign

Now that you've drilled holes in the wood supports and the fabric layers and have added your velcro, you're ready to assemble the sign.

1. When attaching the width supports to the wood edge piece, make sure one piece is on top and the other piece goes underneath. This way when you collapse and fold your sign the wood pieces won’t hit each other.

2. Push screws through the fabric and wood pieces from front to back. Secure with wingnuts in the back. Tighten wingnuts to secure assemble and Loosen wingnuts to collapse.

Step 5: Collapse Your Sign for Easy Transport

You can add some fancy washi or duct tape to the wood handle for a more pleasant sign holding experience.

No need to take everything apart to collapse, just loosen the wingnuts, unvelcro the top and bottom wood supports and fold towards the center, and then fold up the handle. Once all the wood is bundled together roll the whole thing inside the chalkboard fabric like a yummy burrito and secure with a festive ribbon or tie.

Easily Transportable and Re-useable!

<p>I made a version with cardboard as the supports. They didn't end up checking signs at the DC march. It was comfortable to carry the whole way. I think I'd use chalkboard markers instead of actual chalk next time so it doesn't smudge. I'd also glue a fabric panel to the back so it could be double sided. It was nice to have leftover chalk to contribute to this fabulous spontaneous situation at a rest area in MD.</p>
This is a brilliant idea that I must try!<br>however a lot of my demonstrations are done in bad weather, so I'm not sure how well the fabric would do.
The fabric is some sort of vinyl so it should be fine to get wet. I was thinking of maybe putting some plastic cling wrap over the writing.

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