Introduction: Collapsible Cornhole Boards

I wanted to make a set of cornhole boards that I could take with me to picnics and cookouts. Unfortunately, my car is too small to easily transport a set of standard cornhole boards. So I designed a set of board that will fold in half. That made them a lot easier to transport and store. Here is how I made them.

Step 1: Materials

Here is a list of materials and tools that I used to build this project.

Materials:

2ft x 2ft OSB boards (or other construction board)

2" x 4" Boards (four 8ft long board should be sufficient)

2" Drywall Screws

Paint

Hinge and mounting screws

1/4" Bolts (3 1/2" long)

1/4" Washers

1/4" Nuts

Tools:

Drill and Bit Set

Pencil

Tape Measure

Saw

Step 2: Cut the 2 X 4's for the Frame

The 2 x 4's will form the base frames of the board. We are going to make two square frames that are each about 2 feet by 2 feet. The exact dimensions of these frames need to match the OSB boards. In my case, the OSB boards were actually 24 inches by 23.5 inches. So I designed my frame to match that.

For the right and left sides, I cut sections of 2 x 4 that were 24 inches long. For the front and back sides, I cut pieces that were 20.5 inches each. The actual dimensions of a 2 x 4 are 1.5 x 3.5. So this would make a frame that was 24 inches by 23.5 inches.

Step 3: Pre-drill the Pieces of the Frame

To help ensure that all the pieces of the frame line up, I pre-drilled all the screw holes. On the right and left pieces, I made the holes 3/4 of an inch from the ends of the boards. This lines up with the center of an front and back boards.

It is easiest if you drill the holes in the front and back boards through the holes in the right and left boards. Just line up the boards as they will be assembled. If possible clamp them together. Then drill through the holes in te right and left boards straight into the front and back boards. This will ensure that the holes line up.

I also used a large drill bit to countersink the outside holes. This will ensure that the screws will sit flush with the boards.

Step 4: Screw the 2 X 4's Together

Line up the boards as they will be assembled. If possible clamp them together. Then screw the screws into the right and left boards and into the front and back boards.

Step 5: Attach the Top Board

Once the 2 x 4 frame is assembled, you are ready to attach the OSB board on top. Line up the OSB board on the 2 x 4 frame. If the sides of the frame are not perfectly square, just focus on lining up one side. Then press the top board in place. I just stood on top of it.

Drill three or for pilot hole where you want the screws to be. Then use a larger bit to countersink the top of each hole. Insert screws into each of these holes.

Now select one of the adjacent sides and make sure that this side is lined up with the edge of the top board. Then again press the board in place. Drill pilot holes. Countersink the top of each hole. And insert the screws. Repeat all this with the remaining sides.

Now one half of the board is complete.

Step 6: Repeat the Previous Step to Make a Second Square Frame

Repeat the last four steps to make a second square frame.

Step 7: Cut a 6 Inch Hole in One Board

Now you need to cut a hole in one of the boards. This hole should be 6 inches in diameter. The center of the hole should be centered on the board between the two sides and 9 inches from the back.

If you have a 6 inch hole saw, you can use that to cut the hole. Otherwise trace the circle and use a jigsaw to cut it out.

I recommend giving the top board a thorough sanding afterwards. The cutting will leave a lot of rough edges.

Step 8: Cut Out the Feet for the Board

The official rules for cornhole state that the board must be propped up at a certain angle. The front edge of the board should be about four inches off the ground and the back edge of the board should be about 12 inches off the ground.

In order to set up the board at the appropriate angle, it needs a pair of feet in the back of the board. To conserve space, I am using retractable feet. These will fold inside the box when not in use.

To make these, I cut a piece of 2x4 that was 12 inches long. Then I traced a half circle on one edge that will round off the edges. On the opposite end, I cut the board at an angle so that the feet will sit flat on the ground.

Step 9: Paint the Boards (optional)

If you want to paint the boards. This would be a good time to do that. Apply one coat of primer. Allow the primer to fully dry. Then apply one or more layers of paint. Allow the paint to fully dry before attaching any of the hardware.

Step 10: Attach the Legs

Position the legs as they would be when the board is standing up. Then while holding the leg firmly in place, drill through the hole in the leg and into the side board. This will mark the location of the hole in the side board. Drill a hole all the way through the board. Then put a washer onto the bolt insert it through the hole. Put a washer and nut on the end of the bolt to secure it in place. Do this on both sides. Now your board has a set of retractable legs.

Step 11: Make Some Bags

To play cornhole you need a set of bags. These are typically filled with unpopped popcorn kernels. The bags need to be squares that measure 6" x 6" before being filled. The most common fabric that is used is duck cloth. But I used burlap because it was what I had in my bin of scraps.

To make the bags cut out two squares of fabric that are each 7" x 7". Then sew a 1/2" seam around the edges. Leave a small gap so that you can add the corn. Flip the bag inside out to hide the seams. Then fill the bags with about 16 ounces of corn.

This basic process will make a decent bag for cornhole. But if you want to make it a little more fun, you can decorate the bags any way that you want. For example, here is a tutorial on how to make bags for a Mario themed game. https://www.instructables.com/id/Mario-and-Luigi-Co...

Step 12: Finished Cornhole Boards

And now your folding cornhole board is complete. To collapse it, just flip the board over, fold in the legs and then fold the board in half. Once collapsed, the board is much smaller and easier to carry around. It is also compact enough to fit in even the smallest cars. Now you have a set of boards that you can take with you anywhere.

Comments

author
BrandonJ55 made it! (author)2016-08-08

Just a few pointers on this design:

1. Buy 3" drywall screws not 2'' because they barely get through the 1 3/4'' 2x4.

2. Buy 4'' bolts not 3 1/2's just to be safe as I had to get the longer ones.

3. After making the set I'd definetly spend the few extra $ and upgrade from OSB to a higher quality plywood. It's easier to sand and paint and looks much nicer.

4. I incorporated a built in handle and latch to keep it shut when you close it. The latch was easy enough at Home Depot (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-2-1-2-in-Black-Hook-and-Eye-2-Pack-20327/204727569). And I just cut into one of the side 2x4 a round semi-circle the size of my hand so that I could grip it when transporting it.

cornhole1.jpgcornhole2.jpg
author

Thanks for the tips.

author
ryanjamesburr (author)2015-07-02

How much does a game weigh? Would 1" by 4" work for the box? I'm looking to cut weight on the game. Also since there is additional support halfway through the box, would 1/2" or thinner plywood work for the board?

author

A regular board is pretty heavy. You can use thinner boards. Just don't let anyone stand on it. But if you really want to cut weight you might try a design like this https://www.instructables.com/id/Collapsible-Cornhole-Boards/

author
NTT (author)2015-06-20

What is a corn hole board?

author
Battlespeed (author)NTT2015-06-20

It's used in a game where two opponents or two teams take turns throwing bags of corn at a slanted board that has a hole at the far end of the board. A bag in the hole = 3 points, one that stays on the board = 1 point. First team to 21 wins.

author
Stark Ideas (author)2015-06-19

Great project.. be sure to paint them with your favorite teams colors! thanks

author
mtairymd (author)2015-06-19

I've never built or purchased cornhole boards due to the size and issues with storage. That is a really good idea! Thanks for sharing.

author
CarmelitoAndrade (author)2015-06-19

Awesome !! I use to play this a lot with my buddies at the pub.. Thanks for all the steps.

author
seamster (author)2015-06-19

Nice! I've made dozens of cornhole sets, but never thought to make a fold-in-half version. This is a great idea.

author

Just wait until next week. I am adding some electronics to it so that I lights up and plays sounds when you score.

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Bio: My name is Jason Poel Smith I am a Community Manager here at Instructables. In my free time, I am an Inventor, Maker, Hacker, Tinker ... More »
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