Introduction: Concrete Bed Risers

Picture of Concrete Bed Risers

I'm currently living in a small room and needed some more storage space despite my bed frame being pretty high off the ground. What better place to store your things than under your bed? However, my bed needed an extra eight inches of lift as opposed to the 5-6 you'll get from cheap bed risers from the store. I chose to make my own out of concrete.

Maybe you have plenty of storage space and just want to sleep a little closer to the stars! That's cool too. Anything is possible when your bed is roughly 8 inches higher off the ground.

This Instructable isn't as complete and beautiful as I'd like it to be. I didn't take enough pictures because this was actually a side project while I was working on something else. Either way, hope you enjoy reading!

-

Index:
Step 1: Flow Build!
Step 2: Tools and Materials
Step 3: Mixing
Step 4: Pouring
Step 5: Remove and Raise

Step 1: Flow Build!

Picture of Flow Build!

So I tried making a thing. This thing I've called a "Flow Build" because I'm not sure what else to call it. The purpose of a flow build is to describe a project in simple terms using a single image. The goal of these images is that they can be shared easily on social media, and read easily on a smart phone. I'm curious to see if you all love them, hate them, or think they could have potential.

Step 2: Tools and Materials

Picture of Tools and Materials

All of these can be found at the local hardware or home improvement store, or the dollar store.

Materials:

  1. Portland Cement
  2. Play Sand
  3. Water
  4. Pitcher
  5. Mold release spray, cooking spray, vasoline (optional to grease mold)

Tools:

  1. Something to stir with
  2. Bucket

Step 3: Mixing

Picture of Mixing

Place a ratio of one part portland cement to two parts water in the bucket. Exact measurements do not matter here, so this is just a rough estimate. Mix the powders together thoroughly then add water until a slightly thick mixture is achieved. It really is a good idea to mix the sand and portland cement together before adding water. It makes for a more homogeneous mixture, and makes the mixing easier.

Step 4: Pouring

Picture of Pouring

There's no rocket science to pouring the concrete mixture into the pitcher, but here's a couple things to keep in mind:

  1. Pay attention so that each time you pour the concrete, it reaches the same height in the pitcher.That way all of the risers will be the same height as well.
  2. Also allow the mold to rest on a level surface while it sets, so that the top of the mold is also level. A slanted surface will cause the concrete to shift into a slant while it sets, causing the riser to be unlevel.

If desired, you can rub down the sides of the pitcher with vasoline, spray it with cooking spray, or buy some fancy mold-release spray. I chose not to. I was able to bend and shake the pitcher to easily remove three out of four of the bed risers without any lubrication, and the fourth was easily cut out using a utility knife.

Allow the concrete to set at least overnight. I waited at least 24 hours with mine.

Step 5: Remove and Raise

Picture of Remove and Raise

As stated previously, the risers were removed from the pitcher mold by bending the sides of the pitcher slightly, shaking, and sometimes tapping the mold with a piece of wood to cause air to move between the concrete and the mold. The process wasn't particularly difficult, and could have been even easier by using a mold-release agent.

Once four have been made, place them under the feet of your bed to give it some extra lift!

-

Thank you so much for reading! Leave a comment if you feel motivated. I like comments!

Comments

Kinnishian (author)2015-10-19

Earlier I wrote the recipe was unclear. It was not unclear. I was simply unaware how one makes cement. You just mix, then add water to determine consistency.

Do you have any particular reason for choosing a 2:1 ratio as opposed to the seemingly more common 3:1 ratio? [I dont know much about this stuff]

Thanks!

fozzy13 (author)Kinnishian2015-10-19

I've found that when you use more cement, the mixture is more solid. Because this is a relatively small amount instead of a large slab of concrete, I thought it would help them stay together.

Kinnishian (author)2015-10-19

So i like this instructable! Making a set now, though I am not totally satisfied with the molds i found. But as feedback, I was/am a little confused by the concrete recipe. In the flow image you say:
"2 parts portland cement, 1 part sand, then add water"
And in the instructable you say "Place a ratio of one part portland cement to two parts water in the bucket." where in context it really seems like you meant the cement to two parts sand.

But I am not really sure what the suggested recipe is so I'm going to look up another recipe online hopefully it'll work out :)

Nice, I just bought some of these, I should have just made them!

Thank you! Making is always the better option isn't it hahh?

mastersoncraft (author)fozzy132014-07-27

I used to use books! This is a much better option.

fozzy13 (author)mastersoncraft2014-07-27

Hahh given how large and limited in use college textbooks have, I'm not sure books are a bad option though. Thanks for checking out my project!

jgrooms2 (author)2014-07-19

I think I might still fill up the store bought ones with concrete due to the 5 yr old's preference of jumping on my bed and not her own.

fozzy13 (author)jgrooms22014-07-19

That's not a bad idea! It would definitely add a lot of stability to them. I was pleasantly surprised with how well mine are performing. Thanks for reading and commenting!

jgrooms2 (author)2014-07-18

How well do you think these will remain upright under vigorous activity?

I just set some up from the store and knocked them over twice while attempting to put the bed on the frame.

fozzy13 (author)jgrooms22014-07-19

That was actually a concern while I was building them hahh. To my pleasant surprise they're really sturdy. The pitcher that was used as a mold has indents that nicely hold the narrow feet of my bed frame. Because the open top of the mold becomes the bottom of the riser, it is a rougher surface and provides a kind of grip to the carpet, keeping them in place. The weight of the concrete also contributes to how well they stay still. I'm pretty happy with their performance.

HappyToBeAlive (author)2014-07-18

i love the flo build idea......maybe you should do an instructable of how you did it?

fozzy13 (author)HappyToBeAlive2014-07-18

Thank you! Just go to the next step hahh there are instructions! I tried to make that clear in the Intro's Index. Hope you found it.

About This Instructable

8,140views

15favorites

License:

Bio: I am currently a mechanical engineering student at the University of Toledo, and the founder of the University of Toledo Maker Society. I have a ... More »
More by fozzy13:3D Printed American Flag - Multicolor Single Extruder Printing3D Printed Home Decor - Plant Boosters/Risers3D Printed Tablet Speaker Amplifying Stand Handles
Add instructable to: