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It still amazes me how versatile this material is. Although this is a simple project I'm really impressed with how it turned out. It takes very little time because of the PVC 'moulds' and they can easily be batched out because the moulds are reusable.

Step 1: Build the Form

Cut the big and small pipe to the same length. The length of the big pipe will be the total height of the pot.

Cut the dowel to roughly 100mm.

Drill a hole into the centre of the push on cap so that the dowel can only just slide through. This will be the drainage hole so don’t make it too big. I used a 9.5mm dowel.

Apply some WD40 to outside of the big pipe at one end and the inside of the push on cap. Push the cap onto the pipe.

Push the dowel into the cap so that half is inside the pipe.

Step 2: Add Concrete/Mortar

Apply WD40 to the inside of the big pipe.

Mix up the mortar/concrete and fill bottom of the mould with around 30mm. This will become the base of the pot.

Apply WD40 to the outside of the small pipe and place it gently onto the mortar/concrete, in the centre of the big pipe.

Now fill concrete/mortar around the outside of the small pipe. Add the concrete slowly making sure the small pipe stays in the centre.

Once the mould is full, tap is to remove air bubbles and level out the concrete/mortar.

Cover the mould with plastic and allow to cure for 2 days. After that remove the plastic, and cap on the base, and leave it to dry for another day.

Step 3: Seal/Paint

Gently slide the big pipe off the concrete/mortar. This might require some finesse and ingenuity. Once it’s free remove the inside pipe.

If you want to paint the concrete/mortar, now’s the time. After that give the whole piece a coat of sealer. This will ensure the concrete doesn’t stain.

There's one thing you should know about with Fibermesh is that the small fibers that don't get submerged all the way will stick out. It's not a problem in flatwork because the foot traffic will just shear them off in a very short time. In your creations you may have to sand them down in order to eliminate them. They're so fine you really don't notice them, so when you get a chance you need to try them out, especially in larger projects. Keep up the great work.
did you know this is how reinforced concrete was fist made? someone decided to try concrete in place of clay but they broke easy, so he used steel wire to hold it together better.<br>Turns out, steel and concrete auctually bond to get as well.<br>Looks great!
That's really interesting. I'm still very new to the whole concrete craze but I can see why people like to work with it. Thanks for the comment
Concrete has great compressive strength but it doesn't have tensile strength, that's where steel rebar comes in because of its tensile strength. Because of their small size flower pots don't need rebar or steel mesh, but if you make something larger where you are concerned about it breaking, I would suggest that you use Fibermesh. I've seen small bags of it at the home stores, but I would suggest that if you have a concrete plant near by go ask them if you could buy 1 bag, 1 bag is enough for 1 yard of concrete and would last you a long time. The original Fibermesh is made of microsynthetic fibers, about an inch long, they also make fibers from steel for commercial flooring and other industrial uses.
<p>I was worried that it might've needed some rebar but was pleasantly surprised when it held together without.</p><p>I haven't heard of fibermesh but i'll look into it. For more intricate designs it sounds like a good thing to add.</p>
Reading a book right now that talks about that very thing. If you like that sort of stuff, check it out! &quot;Stuff Matters&quot; is the title. Quite enjoyable.
That's the book I got the information from, it's a great book.
<p>Cheers Zeke, I'll take a look</p>

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