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Continous flow Aluminum Smelter

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This instructible has no photos, only drawings. This unit I Built in the late 70's for melting aluminum transmissions, bumpers and such.
The unit was about 4 ft square and 6 ft tall, would accept whole transmissions that that had been drained of oil, and automobile bumpers thru its 36" feed chute. the continuous flow of molten aluminum was poured into 1/2 ton molds.
The burner unit which is the main focus here can be scaled up or down for your particular needs. This size unit when burning uses about 7 gals used oil an hour, at 20,000 btu per lb, that's equivalent to 1.12 million btu an hr. much more than most garages need.
A 1.5" x 12" unit was placed in a barrel stove in a garage, it produced as if the barrel stove was running wide open, and burned thru in 5 mins because there was no fire brick. So be careful and have fire extinguishers handy, if you decide to build a unit like this.
 
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Step 1: Continous flow Smelter

Picture of Continous flow Smelter
This pic shows the 2 main tubes and how the holes are drilled and assembled with fuel inlet and end caps. Muffler tubing, low carbon steel tubing is fine. Size will depend heat output since size determines how fast the oil can be broken down to lighter fuels.

Step 2: Air input

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The air is provided by a blower, I have used kirby vacuums, canister vacuums in 5, 10, and 20 gal size, and commercial vane blowers salvaged from scrap yards as the blower. The size will depend on the heat output you intend to produce. the Standard exhaust tubing unit will be totally useful using the 5-10 gal vacs. Always provide a divirsion valve for the air flow for smooth startups and when restricting to a reduced heat output.
PS1182 years ago
You say "was". Is this unit no longer available to take pictures of?

If so, are you planning on rebuilding it? I'd sure love to see a step-by-step if you do!
daveand5 (author)  PS1181 year ago
it was used in the 70's to smelt 2 tons a day, (good prices then) and has been relegated to the scrap yard years ago. Small units were built since then to clean up a few scrap yards, but they were made 'disposable' since the jobs were only a few tons.
daveand5 (author) 2 years ago
this is a step by step of the burner, the smelter/furnace itself can vary according to the use and size of burner being built. It was in use in the 70's by myself as different sizes from a 2 1/2" diameter to 8" diameter burner. They can be built even smaller or larger, depending on materials available and end use.
  Since I'm retired and disabled I'll no longer be building another. But will assist anyone in anyway I can.
  Some reference material you might be interested in and can google:
       Destructive decomposition
       crude and refined oil composition, i.e. what grades and types of oil make up the oils you might be using
     Carbon chains, i.e. methane, butane, propane, hexane, heptane, octane, pentane, dodecane, etc..
  available  Heat of carbon chains - 20,000btu/lb

Have fun and be careful..
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